Tag Archives: Magnetic resonance imaging

Aphasia


Aphasia

Aphasia is a language disturbance caused by a lesion of the brain that partially or totally impairs the affected individual’s ability to speak, write, or comprehend the meaning of spoken or written words. Often caused by head trauma, tumor, stroke, or infection, aphasia is distinguished from functional disorders—such as stammering or stuttering—and from impaired speech due to physical defects of the speech organs. What is the difference between Broca’s aphasia and Wernicke’s aphasia? More… Discuss

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this day in the yesteryear: Wilhelm Röntgen Discovers X-Rays (1895)


Wilhelm Röntgen Discovers X-Rays (1895)

In 1895, Röntgen, a German physicist, discovered rays that did not exhibit properties such as reflection or refraction. Because of their mysterious nature, he called them X-rays. His discovery, which gave medicine a critical view inside the body and allowed bones to be photographed, remains a valuable diagnostic tool. Röntgen’s breakthrough earned him the first Nobel Prize for Physics in 1901. One of the first X-ray photographs he took was of his wife’s hand. What did she say when she saw it? More… Discuss


Paralysis Reversed with Olfactory Cells

A man paralyzed from the chest down in a knife attack that severed his spine in 2010 has regained the ability to walk, with assistance, thanks to a pioneering new surgery that involved transplanting olfactory cells into his spinal cord. Olfactory ensheathing cells grow throughout life and can regenerate after injury, so researchers hypothesized that they would be ideally suited to help bridge the gap in the patient‘s spinal cord. Now, two years after the surgery, the patient is able to walk with the aid of a frame and has recovered some bladder, bowel, and sexual function. More… Discuss

QUOTATION: Honore de Balzac


No man should marry until he has studied anatomy and dissected at least one woman.

Honore de Balzac (1799-1850) Discuss

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Right Brain vs. Left Brain


Right Brain vs. Left Brain

Do you see the dancer turning clockwise or anti-clockwise?

According to this article, if you see the girl turning clockwise, then you use more of the right side of the brain and vice versa.

Most of us would see the dancer turning anti-clockwise though you can try to focus and change the direction; see if you can do it.

(When I first look at it, I see the dancer turning clockwise, but after a few seconds, it flips to counterclockwise, go figure.)
I started by seeing the girl spinning clockwise (from left to right) and then anti clockwise: THis is a good exercise to keep your brain alert, and balanced: share it with your grandparents too!SpinningGirl

 

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