Tag Archives: Major depressive disorder

in the news: Laughing Gas Could Be Antidepressant Alternative


Laughing Gas Could Be Antidepressant Alternative

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have found that “laughing gas”—nitrous oxide, the mild sedative often used in dental procedures—can alleviate symptoms of clinical depression in patients who see few results with traditional antidepressant s. More than half of study participants who received nitrous oxide treatment felt a noticeable improvement in their symptoms after a day, and some reported complete remission. However, researchers say further studies are needed to replicate the results. More… Discuss

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Take a Break from Taking a Load Off ( in order to keep our old memories alive we need to create new ones)


Take a Break from Taking a Load Off

It has been well documented that physical activity is vital to maintaining one’s health. While moderate to vigorous exercise provides the greatest benefit, even simply shifting from a sitting to a standing position could greatly benefit older adults. Researchers found that highly sedentary older adults who repeatedly break-up their sedentary behavior throughout the day have higher physical function than those who do not. They therefore recommend that for every hour spent in sedentary behavior, older adults interrupt it nine times. More… Discuss

Sibling Bullying Takes Mental Toll


Sibling Bullying Takes Mental Toll

Siblings will inevitably fight, but when one regularly says nasty or hurtful things to or about the other, gets physical with him or her, or consistently ignores him or her, it crosses the line into bullying and can do lasting harm. Eighteen-year-olds who were bullied by a sibling several times a week in childhood were about twice as likely as their peers to have depression, to have anxiety, and to engage in self-harm. It is important, therefore, for parents to understand that bullying can occur in the home just as it can in school and to intervene when they see their children treating each other in a bullying manner. More… Discuss

NEWS: CLUB DRUG LIFTS DEPRESSION


Club Drug Lifts Depression

The horse tranquilizer ketamine, which has become popular on the club scene, shows significant promise in the treatment of depression. In recent small trials, low doses of the drug were able to lift depression symptoms in a number of patients, and effects persisted in some for days and in others for months. While ketamine will not be replacing Prozac and similar traditional antidepressants anytime soon—it poses a risk of serious side-effects and must be intravenously administered—it opens up a new area of research in the pharmacological treatment of depression. More… Discuss

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NEWS: FIRST BIOMARKER FOR DEPRESSION IDENTIFIED


First Biomarker for Depression Identified

Researchers have identified the first biomarker for clinical depression, and it could be helpful in identifying teenage boys at risk of developing the mental illness. Teen boys with depressive mood symptoms, such as feelings of misery, loneliness, or of not being loved, who also had high levels of the stress hormone cortisol were 14 times more likely to develop depression than those with low cortisol levels and no depressive symptoms. During the course of one three-year study, about half of the boys identified as high-risk using this screening tool went on to be diagnosed with clinical depression. More… Discuss

 

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DEPRESSION LARGELY UNTREATED IN HEAD AND NECK CANCER SURVIVORS


Depression Largely Untreated in Head and Neck Cancer Survivors

Cancer’s emotional toll does not always end when the disease is eradicated. Survivors of head and neck cancer in particular are at elevated risk for depression. This is not surprising, considering that treatments for these cancers often have physical side effects that lead to trouble swallowing and speaking and increase social isolation. Still, few actually seek treatment for their depression, and their risk of suicide is four times that of the general population. More… Discuss

 

DEPRESSION MAY BE UNDERDIAGNOSED IN MEN


Depression May Be Underdiagnosed in Men

Women are about twice as likely as men to be diagnosed with depression, but this is not necessarily indicative of actual depression rates. Some studies have suggested that men and women exhibit different symptoms when depressed, with men more likely to show signs of anger, self-destruction, self-distractions, and irritability than sadness. When researchers take into account these alternative depression symptoms, in addition to the traditionally recognized ones, they find that approximately the same percentage of men and women—31% and 33% respectively—meet the criteria for the diagnosis. More… Discuss