Tag Archives: Manhattan

this day in the yesteryear: Peter Minuit Buys Manhattan (1626)


Peter Minuit Buys Manhattan (1626)

Peter Minuit was the director-general of the Dutch colony of New Netherland who is credited with the purchase of the island of Manhattan in 1626. According to legend, he persuaded the natives—perhaps a Metoac band of Lenape known as the Canarsee, who were actually native to what is now Brooklyn—to “sell” the island for a handful of trade goods worth approximately 60 guilders. In 1846, that price was converted by a New York historian to what US dollar amount? More… Discuss

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

February 4

786   Harun al-Rashid succeeds his older brother the Abbasid Caliph al-Hadi as Caliph of Baghdad.
1194   Richard I, King of England, is freed from captivity in Germany.
1508   The Proclamation of Trent is made.
1787   Shay’s Rebellion, an uprising of debt-ridden Massachusetts farmers against the new U.S. government, fails.
1795   France abolishes slavery in her territories and confers slaves to citizens.
1889   Harry Longabaugh is released from Sundance Prison in Wyoming, thereby acquiring the famous nickname, “the Sundance Kid.”
1899   After an exchange of gunfire, fighting breaks out between American troops and Filipinos near Manila, sparking the Philippine-American War
1906   The New York Police Department begins finger print identification.
1909   California law segregates Caucasian and Japanese schoolchildren.
1915   Germany decrees British waters as part of the war zone; all ships to be sunk without warning.
1923   French troops take the territories of Offenburg, Appenweier and Buhl in the Ruhr as a part of the agreement ending World War I.
1932   Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt inaugurates the Winter Olympics at Lake Placid, N.Y.
1941   The United Service Organization (U.S.O.) is formed to cater to armed forces and defense industries.
1944   The Japanese attack the Indian Seventh Army in Burma.
1945   The Big Three, American, British and Soviet leaders, meet in Yalta to discuss the war aims.
1966   Senate Foreign Relations Committee begins televised hearings on the Vietnam War.
1980   Syria withdraws its peacekeeping force in Beirut.
1986   The U.S. Post Office issues a commemorative stamp featuring Sojourner Truth.
Born on February 4
1881   Fernand Leger, French painter.
1900   Jacques Prevert, French poet, screenwriter (The Visitors of the Evening, The Children of Paradise).
1902   Charles Lindbergh, the first man to fly solo across the Atlantic.
1906   Dietrich Bonhoeffer, German Protestant theologian.
1906   Clyde Tombaugh, astronomer, discovered Pluto.
1913   Rosa Lee Parks, civil rights activist.
1921   Betty Friedan, writer, feminist, founded the National Organization of Women in 1966.
1925   Russell Hoban, artist and writer (Bedtime for Frances, The Mouse and His Child).
1932   Robert Coover, novelist & short story writer.
1947   Dan Quayle, vice president under President George H.W. Bush.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.fNGS84mj.dpuf

Borodin ~ Symphony No. 3 in A minor, great compositions/performances


Borodin ~ Symphony No. 3 in A minor ~ Complete

 

Today’s Picture: January 1, 1892, after two years of construction, the U.S. Immigration Service opened Ellis Island in New York Harbor



On January 1, 1892, after two years of construction, the U.S. Immigration Service opened Ellis Island in New York Harbor, a new facility for ‘processing’ immigrants. Formerly used as a munitions dump and landfill, Ellis Island was designed, its architects claimed, to handle more than 8,000 newcomers a day. Orderly lines funneled bewildered immigrants past doctors and officials who examined them for signs of disease. The physically and mentally ill were refused admittance, forcing thousands of families to make the difficult decision to return home with a relative refused entry or push on without them. A final brusque interview by an immigration official determined whether the newcomers had already been promised jobs. About 80 percent of those who entered Ellis Island received landing cards permitting them to board ferries for New York City. In the 1890s, 75 percent of all immigrants entered the United States through Ellis Island. – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.yUdRynY2.dpuf

News: Pet Piercings, Tattoos Banned in New York


Pet Piercings, Tattoos Banned in New York

The state of New York has passed a law targeting the controversial practices of pet tattooing and piercing that will leave offenders with up to $250 in fines and up to 15 days imprisonment. Although the bill was introduced in 2011—after an online entrepreneur began selling “gothic kittens” with piercings down their spines—it gained traction this year when a Brooklyn man publicized tattooing his pit bull while it was anaesthetized for spleen surgery. The law applies to all types of pets and goes into effect in 2015. More… Discuss

this pressed for clarity: A black hole for our best and brightest | The Washington Post


NEW YORK — The thing Deborah Jackson remembers from her first interviews at Goldman Sachs is the slogan. It was stamped on the glass doors of the offices in the investment bank’s headquarters just off Wall Street, the lure of the place in two words, eight syllables: “Uncommon capability.”

Jackson joined Goldman in 1980, fresh from business school and steeped in the workings of government and finance. She found crackerjack colleagues and more business than she could handle. She worked in municipal finance, lending money to local governments, hospitals and nonprofits around the country. She flew first class to scout potential deals — “The issue was, can you really be productive if you’re in a tiny seat in the back?” — and when the time came to seal one, she’d welcome clients and their attorneys to Manhattan’s best restaurants.

The clients would bring their spouses and go to shows.

A black hole for our best and brightest

Wall Street is expanding, and the economy is worse off for it.

via A black hole for our best and brightest | The Washington Post.

ASSOCIATED PRESS: Police Chokehold Death


ASSOCIATED PRESS: Police Chokehold Death

Demonstrators march across the Brooklyn Bridge during a protest against a grand jury‘s decision not to indict the police officer involved in the death of Eric Garner, Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014, in New York. A grand jury cleared a white New York City police officer Wednesday in the videotaped chokehold death of Garner, an unarmed black man, who had been stopped on suspicion of selling loose, untaxed cigarettes. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

 

More HERE and HERE

This pressed: L’affaire #Ferguson, miroir de la société américaine ? #DébatF24 — Débat FRANCE 24 (@DebatF24)


make music part of your life series: George Gershwin – Cuban Overture


[youtube.com/watch?v=RBd1bmYB4t4]

George GershwinCuban Overture

Uploaded on Aug 9, 2010

Born the son of Russian-Jewish immigrants into the vibrant life of Manhattan, George Gershwin created much of the twentieth century’s musical highlights, with an endless stream of hit shows. His fascination with classical music, and his fusion of many varied musical forms like jazz, blues and ragtime, brought us the likes of Porgy and Bess and Rhapsody in Blue.

Cuban Overture (running time : 11:16)
Courtesy goes to Richard Hayman and his Symphony Orchestra.

Gershwin’s Cuban Overture, described aptly as a “Rhumba” , was written in 1932. It is a lively evocation of the spirit of Cuba, bringing together the two sides of composer’s abilities, a synthesis of art, jazz and Latin America.

Philip Seymour Hoffman Dead Overdose Apparent Cause


HoffmanPhilip Seymour Hoffman Dead Overdose Apparent Cause.

 

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MANHATTAN’S FIVE POINTS


Manhattan’s Five Points

Five Points was a notorious New York City slum centered on a five-cornered intersection in what is now Foley Square. The neighborhood, home to the infamous “gangs of New York,” was created in the early 1800s after Collect Pond was filled, creating a swamp and prompting its more affluent inhabitants to move amid declining conditions. Heavily populated by free African Americans and Irish immigrants, Five Points was an early example of racial integration in the US. What form of dance emerged there? More… Discuss

Today’s Birthday: Paul Julius Freiherr von Reuter (1816)


Paul Julius Freiherr von Reuter (1816)

Reuter, founder of the Reuters news agency, was a pioneer of telegraphy and news reporting. In 1849, he started a post service to bridge the gap in a telegraph line between Germany and Belgium. He soon moved to England and opened a telegraph office serving banks, brokerages, and businesses. He steadily extended his commercial news service, acquiring his first subscribing newspaper client in 1858. Undersea cables enabled him to expand the service. What animal was used to deliver messages in 1849? More… Discuss

Chelsea Hotel #2 (Song for JANIS JOPLIN) by Leonard Cohen (Subtitulado Español)



Chelsea Hotel, (by Leonard Cohen)

I remember you well in the Chelsea Hotel,
you were talking so brave and so sweet,
giving me head on the unmade bed,
while the limousines wait in the street.
Those were the reasons and that was New York,
we were running for the money and the flesh.
And that was called love for the workers in song
probably still is for those of them left.

Ah but you got away, didn’t you babe,
you just turned your back on the crowd,
you got away, I never once heard you say,
I need you, I don’t need you,
I need you, I don’t need you
and all of that jiving around.

I remember you well in the Chelsea Hotel
you were famous, your heart was a legend.
You told me again you preferred handsome men
but for me you would make an exception.
And clenching your fist for the ones like us
who are oppressed by the figures of beauty,
you fixed yourself, you said, “Well never mind,
we are ugly but we have the music.”

And then you got away, didn’t you babe…

I don’t mean to suggest that I loved you the best,
I can’t keep track of each fallen robin.
I remember you well in the Chelsea Hotel,
that’s all, I don’t even think of you that often.