Tag Archives: Marie


October 29, 1875 in History Born:
Marie, queen consort of Ferdinand I of Romania, 1914-27

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Princess Marie of Edinburgh, more commonly known as Marie of Romania (Marie Alexandra Victoria; 29 October 1875 – 18 July 1938),[note 1] was the last Queen consort of Romania as the wife of King Ferdinand I.

Born into the British royal family, she was titled Princess Marie of Edinburgh at birth. Her parents were Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh and Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna of Russia. Marie’s early years were spent in Kent, Malta and Coburg. After refusing a proposal from her cousin, the future King George V, she was chosen as the future wife of Crown Prince Ferdinand of Romania, the heir apparent of King Carol I, in 1892. Marie was Crown Princess between 1893 and 1914, and became immediately popular with the Romanian people.

Marie visiting a military hospital, 1917

 

Marie had controlled her weak-willed husband even before his ascension in 1914, prompting a Canadian newspaper to state that “few royal consorts have wielded greater influence than did Queen Marie during the reign of her husband”.[2]

After the outbreak of World War I, Marie urged Ferdinand to ally himself with the Triple Entente and declare war on Germany, which he eventually did in 1916. During the early stages of fighting, Bucharest was occupied by the Central Powers and Marie, Ferdinand and their five children took refuge in Moldavia. There, she and her three daughters acted as nurses in military hospitals, caring for soldiers who were wounded or afflicted by cholera. On 1 December 1918, the province of Transylvania, following Bessarabia and Bukovina, united with the Old Kingdom. Marie, now Queen consort of Greater Romania, attended the Paris Peace Conference of 1919, where she campaigned for international recognition of the enlarged Romania. In 1922, she and Ferdinand were crowned in a specially-built cathedral in the ancient city of Alba Iulia, in an elaborate ceremony which mirrored their status as queen and king of a united state.

1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

<<< 1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

As queen, she was very popular, both in Romania and abroad. In 1926, Marie and two of her children undertook a diplomatic tour of the United States. They were received enthusiastically by the people and visited several cities before returning to Romania. There, Marie found that Ferdinand was gravely ill and he died a few months later. Now queen dowager, Marie refused to be part of the regency council which reigned over the country under the minority of her grandson, King Michael. In 1930, Marie’s eldest son Carol, who had waived his rights to succession, deposed his son and usurped the throne, becoming King Carol II. He removed Marie from the political scene and strived to crush her popularity. As a result, Marie moved away from Bucharest and spent the rest of her life either in the countryside, or at her home by the Black Sea. In 1937, she became ill with cirrhosis and died the following year.

Following Romania’s transition to a Socialist Republic, the monarchy was excoriated by communist officials. Several biographies of the royal family described Marie either as a drunkard or as a promiscuous woman, referring to her many alleged affairs and to orgies she had supposedly organised before and during the war. In the years preceding the Romanian Revolution of 1989, Marie’s popularity recovered and she was offered as a model of patriotism to the population. Marie is primarily remembered for her work as a nurse, but is also known for her extensive writing, including her critically acclaimed autobiography.

Queen Mary of Romania 2.jpg

Marie wearing her regalia. Photograph by George Grantham Bain.
Queen consort of Romania
Reign 10 October 1914 – 20 July 1927
Coronation 15 October 1922
Spouse Ferdinand I, King of Romania
Issue
Full name
Marie Alexandra Victoria
House House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (by birth)
House of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (by marriage)
Father Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh
Mother Maria Alexandrovna of Russia
Born 29 October 1875
Eastwell Park, Kent, England
Died 18 July 1938 (aged 62)
Pelișor Castle, Sinaia, Romania
Burial 24 July 1938[1]
Curtea de Argeș Cathedral
Signature

Read more >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>HERE

Advertisements

Georges Brassens: La Prière (The Prayer)


[youtube.com/watch?v=Uy2KiwjqE2Q]

La Prière

Par le petit garçon qui meurt près de sa mère
Tandis que des enfants s’amusent au parterre
Et par l’oiseau blessé qui ne sait pas comment
Son aile tout à coup s’ensanglante et descend
Par la soif et la faim et le délire ardent
Je vous salue, Marie.

Par les gosses battus, par l’ivrogne qui rentre
Par l’âne qui reçoit des coups de pied au ventre
Et par l’humiliation de l’innocent châtié
Par la vierge vendue qu’on a déshabillée
Par le fils dont la mère a été insultée
Je vous salue, Marie.

Par la vieille qui, trébuchant sous trop de poids
S’écrie: ” Mon Dieu ! ” par le malheureux dont les bras
Ne purent s’appuyer sur une amour humaine
Comme la Croix du Fils sur Simon de Cyrène
Par le cheval tombé sous le chariot qu’il traîne
Je vous salue, Marie.

Par les quatre horizons qui crucifient le monde
Par tous ceux dont la chair se déchire ou succombe
Par ceux qui sont sans pieds, par ceux qui sont sans mains
Par le malade que l’on opère et qui geint
Et par le juste mis au rang des assassins
Je vous salue, Marie.

Par la mère apprenant que son fils est guéri
Par l’oiseau rappelant l’oiseau tombé du nid
Par l’herbe qui a soif et recueille l’ondée
Par le baiser perdu par l’amour redonné
Et par le mendiant retrouvant sa monnaie
Je vous salue, Marie.

The Prayer

For the little boy who lays dying close to his mother
While children play on the flower bed
And for the wounded bird that doesn’t know how
His wing became suddenly bloody and falls from the sky
For the thirst and the hunger and the feverous delirium
Hail, Mary

For the beaten children, for the drunk who returns home
For the ass who gets kicked in the stomach
And for the humiliation of the innocents who are punished
For the sold virgin that is undressed
For the son whose mother has been insulted
Hail, Mary

For the old woman who stumbles under too much weight
Exclaiming “My God!”, for the unfortunate ones whose arms
Couldn’t rely on a human love
Like Simon of Cyrene bearing the Cross of the Son
For the fallen horse under the chariot that it drags
Hail, Mary

For the four horizons that crucify the world
For all those whose flesh is torn or dies
For all those who are without feet, who are without hands
For the sick that are operated on and moan
And for the just put among the ranks of killers
Hail, Mary

For the mother learning that her son is healed
For the bird calling the fallen bird back to the nest
For the thirsty grass that gathers rain
For the lost kiss returned by love
And for the beggar who finds his money again
Hail, Mary

Great Compositions/Performances: La Prière (avec ça signification Chretienne)- Georges Brassens (1965)



À l’émission “Douce France“, le 4 janvier 1965.
Un poème de Francis Jammes:  Great Compositions/Performances:
La Prière – Georges Brassens (1965)

LA PRIÈRE
Mélodie
Brassens a utilisé deux fois la même mélodie, d’abord sur le poème d’AragonIl n’y a pas d’amour heureux, puis sur celui de Francis Jammes, La prière.
Il s’en est expliqué dans une interview où il raconte qu’au XIXème siècle circulaient des mélodies de base (un peu comme pour le blues en jazz) sur lesquels les chanteurs pouvaient faire coller les paroles qu’ils avaient composées. Ces mélodies passe-partout s’appelaient des “timbres”. 
Les timbres ont été utilisés jusque dans les années 50 en France, notamment par les chansonniers du Grenier de Montmartre (sur Paris Inter) qui écrivaient ou même improvisaient des couplets d’actualité sur des airs standards, dont le public reprenait les refrains. 
Mais voyant que ce qu’il avait cherché à ressusciter était mal compris, (“Qui c’est ce flemmard qui nous sert deux chansons sur le même air?”) Brassens ne renouvela pas l’expérience.
[contact auteur : Henri T.] – [compléter cette analyse]
Complément
Maxime Le Forestier a fait remarquer l’ironie de cette situation: les deux seuls textes que Brassens a dotés d’une même musique sont l’un du très communiste Aragon et l’autre du très catholique Francis Jammes.
[contact auteur : Didier Bergeret]
Calvaire
A l’origine, le poème de Francis Jammes Les mystères douloureux(1905), comportait 5 couplets :
1- Agonie
2- Flagellation
3- Couronnement d’épines (supprimé par G.B.)
4- Portement de croix
5- Crucifiement
Dans le 3) (Couronnement d’épines), F. Jammes réfléchissait sur son sort de poète et cherchait vers le Christ son inspiration. 
“Par le poète dont saigne le front qui est ceint des ronces des désirs que jamais il n’atteint : Je vous salue, Marie
Il faut savoir que Jammes était résolument chrétien, particulièrement en 1905, où il s’était de nouveau adonné à la pratique religieuse. Il est intéressant de remarquer que GB, loin d’être un fervent catholique, a néanmoins choisi de chanter une prière particulièrement pieuse.
Le couplet “Invention de Notre Seigneur au Temple”, est écrit quant à lui par GB en personne. Ce titre est probablement choisi pour indiquer que ce couplet est une contribution de GB au poème. Contribution assez ironique toutefois, puisque GB se compare à “Notre Seigneur” (sous-entendu le Christ). De la même façon que Jammes comparait son travail de souffrance dans le 3e couplet à celui du Christ. Ainsi, GB se moquerait-il de F.J. dans cet ultime couplet, répondant sous des accents christiques aux implorations de F.J. ?
[contact auteur : Damien V.] – [compléter cette analyse]
Complément
Dans son recueil L’église habitée de feuilles (1906), que je n’ai pas sous la main, Francis Jammes illustre les Avé Maria (faut vérifier si tous les 150) et les 15 mystères (= moments de la vie de Jésus) de la prière du Rosaire. Ces mystères sont:
Les Mystères joyeux :
Annonciation – Visitation – Nativité – Purification – Jésus retrouvé au Temple.
Les Mystères douloureux :
Agonie – Flagellation – Couronnement d’épines – Portement de croix – Mort du Christ en croix.
Les Mystères glorieux :
Résurrection – Ascension – Pentecôte – Assomption – Couronnement de la Vierge.
En 2002, Jean-Paul II y a ajouté les Mystères lumineux :
Baptême du Seigneur – Noces de Cana – Annonce du Royaume – Transfiguration – Institution de l’Eucharistie.
[contact auteur : Ralf Tauchmann]
01Par le petit garçon qui meurt près de sa mère
02Tandis que des enfants s’amusent au parterre ;
03Et par l’oiseau blessé qui ne sait pas comment
04Son aile tout à coup s’ensanglante et descend
05Par la soif et la faim et le délire ardent:
06Je vous salue, Marie
 
07Par les gosses battus par l’ivrogne qui rentre,
08Par l’âne qui reçoit des coups de pied au ventre
09Et par l’humiliation de l’innocent châtié,
10Par la vierge vendue qu’on a déshabillée,
11Par le fils dont la mère a été insultée:
12Je vous salue, Marie
 
13Par la vieille qui, trébuchant sous trop de poids,
14S’écrie : “mon Dieu ! “, par le malheureux dont les bras
15Ne purent s’appuyer sur une amour humaine
16Comme la Croix du Fils sur Simon de Cyrène
Référence à la Passion
Référence à l’Evangile selon Saint Matthieu chapitre 27, verset 32 et l’Evangile selon Saint Marc 15, 21. 
Pendant le Chemin de Croix, les soldats réquisitionnent un homme revenu des champs, Simon de Cyrène, pour porter la Croix du Christ, qui est à bout de forces. Le Fils est une référence à l’expression “Le Fils de l’homme”, par laquelle Jésus se définit lui-même. Le Christ est également le Fils de Dieu.
On connaît le caractère anticlérical de certaines chansons de Brassens, voire franchement sacrilège sur la fin de sa vie, mais cette prière de Jammes est touchante par sa sincérité et par les images qu’elle évoque.
[contact auteur : Alexandre T.] – [compléter cette analyse]
17Par le cheval tombé sous le chariot qu’il traîne:
Le service de publication est momentanément désactivé, sans doute à cause d’une trop longue liste d’analyses en attente de modération.
Merci de votre compréhension.
18Je vous salue, Marie
 
19Par les quatre horizons qui crucifient le monde,
20Par tous ceux dont la chair se déchire ou succombe,
21Par ceux qui sont sans pieds, par ceux qui sont sans mains,
22Par le malade que l’on opère et qui geint
23Et par le juste mis au rang des assassins:
24Je vous salue, Marie
 
25Par la mère apprenant que son fils est guéri,
Dernier couplet
Ce couplet est la note personnelle de GB. Voilà qu’en un air de musique, GB arrive à détourner l’idée originale du texte de F.J.
F. Jammes, qui cherchait dans la souffrance du monde et celle du Christ une réponse à ses propres tourments, se voit répondre par GB dans ce dernier couplet.
GB prend ici le contrepied de la démarche de FJ : ce dernier pointait la misère du monde, telle qu’a été la souffrance de Jésus. GB quant à lui met en avant le bonheur retrouvé. En signant lui aussi le couplet par un ave maria, GB signifie ainsi que la souffrance n’est qu’une invention divine pour glorifier le message de Dieu. Dieu ne prend que pour mieux redonner, et inversement, il ne donne que pour mieux reprendre. L’étendue de son pouvoir n’est donc que virtuelle, est bonne à duper que les imbéciles.
[contact auteur : Damien V.] – [compléter cette analyse]
Complément
Cette dernière strophe est tirée des Mystères Joyeux de F. Jammes qui, avec les Mystères douleureux et les Mystères glorieux, illustrent les mystères du Rosaire.
[contact auteur : Ralf Tauchmann]
26Par l’oiseau rappelant l’oiseau tombé du nid,
27Par l’herbe qui a soif et recueille l’ondée,
28Par le baiser perdu par l’amour redonné,
29Et par le mendiant retrouvant sa monnaie :
30Je vous salue, Marie

 

Enhanced by Zemanta