Tag Archives: Marriage of Figaro

Mozart – The Marriage of Figaro Overture (K.492) – Wiener Symphoniker – Fabio Luisi : make music part of your life series


Mozart – The Marriage of Figaro Overture (K.492) – Wiener Symphoniker – Fabio Luisi (HD)

Great Compositions/Performances: Mozart Symphony No 40 G minor K 550 Karl Bohm Wiener Philarmoniker



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Symphony No 40 G minor K 550Karl Bhom conducts Wiener Philarmoniker:

 

 

 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

 

Molto allegro 0:40
Andante 9:42
Menuetto, allegretto 17:25
Finale, allegro assai 22:05

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote his Symphony No. 40 in G minor, KV. 550, in 1788. It is sometimes referred to as the “Great G minor symphony,” to distinguish it from the “Little G minor symphony,” No. 25. The two are the only extant minor key symphonies Mozart wrote.[1]

 

 

 

 

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GREAT COMPOSERS/COMPOSITIONS: Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 23 in A, K. 488


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Photo credit: photoAtlas)

The Piano Concerto No. 23 in A major (K. 488) is a musical composition for piano and orchestra written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. It was finished, according to Mozart’s own catalogue, on March 2, 1786, around the time of the premiere of his opera, The Marriage of Figaro. It was one of three subscription concerts given that spring and was probably played by Mozart himself at one of these. The concerto is scored for piano solo and an orchestra consisting of one flute, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns and strings. In Mozart’s later works the wind instruments are equal to the stringed instruments, and this is also the case in this concerto. It has three movements:
1. Allegro in A major and common time.
2. Adagio in F-sharp minor and 6/8 time (in later editions, the tempo is listed as Andante).
3. Allegro assai in A and alla breve (in later editions, the tempo is listed as Presto). In Rondo form.
The first movement is mostly sunny and positive with the occasional melancholic touches typical of Mozart pieces in A major and is in sonata form. The piece begins with a double exposition, the first played by the orchestra, and the second when the piano joins in. The first exposition is static from a tonal point of view and is quite concise, the third theme is not yet revealed. The second exposition includes the soloist and is modulatory. It is also includes the third previously unheard third theme. The second exposition is ornamented as opposed to the first exposition which is not. The second theme has harmonic tension. This is expressed by dissonances that are played on the beat, and then solved by an interval of a second going downwards. This is also expressed in the use of chromatics in the melody and bass lines which is a cause for harmonic tension, as the listeners anticipate the arrival of the tonic.
The second, slow movement, in ternary form, is melancholic and somewhat operatic in tone. The piano begins alone with a theme characterized by unusually wide leaps. This is the only movement by Mozart in F sharp minor. The dynamics are soft throughout most of the piece. The middle of the movement contains a brighter section in A major announced by flute and clarinet that Mozart would later use to introduce the trio “Ah! taci ingiusto core!” in his opera Don Giovanni. The third movement is a vigorous and cheerful rondo, shaded by moves into other keys as is the opening movement (to C major from E minor and back during the secondary theme in this case, for instance) and with a central section whose opening in F sharp minor is interrupted by a clarinet tune in D major, an intrusion that reminds us, notes Girdlestone, that instrumental music at the time was informed by opera buffa and its sudden changes of point of view as well as of scene. 

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Kathleen Battle: Mozart – La Nozze di Figaro, ‘Deh vieni, non tardar, o gioja bella!’


Lyrics & English Translation 

Giunse alfin il momento,
Che godro senz’affanno,
In braccio all’idol mio!
Timide cure! uscite dal mio petto!
A turbar non venite il mio diletto!
O come par, che all’amoroso foco
L’amenita del loco,
La terra e il ciel risponda!
Come la notte i furti miei seconda!
Deh vieni, non tardar, o gioja bella!
Vieni ove amore per goder t’appella!
Finche non splende in ciel notturna face,
Finche l’aria e ancor bruna e il mondo tace.
Qui mormora il ruscel, qui scherza l’aura,
Che col dolce susurro il cor ristaura,
Qui ridono i fioretti e l’erba e fresca,
Ai piaceri d’amor qui tutto adesca.
Vieni, ben mio, tra queste piante ascose!
Vieni, vieni!
Ti vo’ la fronte incoronar di rose.
Ti vo’ la fronte incoronar, incoronar di rose!

 

The moment finally arrives,
When I’ll enjoy [experience joy] without haste,
In the arms of my beloved!
Fearful anxieties get out of my heart!
Do not come to disturb my delight!
Oh, how it seems that to amorous fires
The comfort of the place.
Earth and heaven respond.
[Oh, it seems that earth, heaven and this place
answerer my heart’s amorous fire.]
As the night responds to my ruses!
Oh, come, don’t be late, my beautiful joy!
Come where love calls you to enjoyment!
Until night’s torches no longer shine in the sky!
As long as the air is still dark
And the world quiet.
Here the river murmurs and the light plays
That restores the heart with sweet ripples.
Here, little flowers laugh and the grass is fresh.
Here, everything entices one to love’s pleasures.
Come, my dear, among these hidden plants.
Come, come!
I want to crown you with roses.

 

 

Kathleen Battle

(born August 13, 1948), is an American soprano known for her agile and light voice and her silvery, pure tone. Battle initially became known for her work within the concert repertoire through performances with major orchestras during the early and mid 1970s. She made her opera debut in 1975. Battle expanded her repertoire into light lyric soprano and lyric coloratura soprano roles during the 1980s and early 1990s. Although she no longer appears in operas, Battle remains active in concert and recital performances…