Tag Archives: max bruch

Max Bruch – Symphony No.3 in E-major, Op.51 (1887) , great compositions/performances


Max Bruch – Symphony No.3 in E-major, Op.51 (1887)

Max Bruch: Violin Concerto no. 1 in G minor, op. 26 – Akiko Suwanai (諏訪内 晶子), great compositions/performances ( 偉大な組成物/公演)


Max Bruch: Violin Concerto no. 1 in G minor, op. 26 – Akiko Suwanai (諏訪内 晶子)

Movements:

  1. Vorspiel: Allegro moderato

  2. Adagio

  3. Finale: Allegro energico

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Max Bruch – Cancona für Violoncello und Orchester op. 55



Max Bruch (1838-1920) – Cancona für Violoncello und Orchester B-Dur op. 55

Julius Berger – Violoncello
Nationales Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Polen
Antoni Wit – Dirigent

Enhanced by Zemanta

Unforgettable Compositions: Claude Debussy : Claude Debussy: Children’s Corner Suite L 113 with André Caplet 1911


Claude Debussy : Children’s Corner Suite – orch. André Caplet 1911
Orchestre National de l’O.R.T.F., Jean Martinon, 1974
oboe: Jules Goetgheluk

1. Doctor Gradus ad Parnassum
2. Jimbo’s Lullaby
3. Serenade for the Doll
4. The Snow is Dancing
5. The Little Shepherd
6. Golliwogg’s Cakewalk

Achille-Claude Debussy (aʃil klod dəbysi) (22 August 1862- 25 March 1918)

Children’s Corner (L.113) is a six-movement suite for solo piano by Claude Debussy. It was published by Durand in 1908, and was given its world première in Paris by Harold Bauer on December 18 of that year. In 1911, an orchestration of the work by Debussy’s friend André Caplet received its première and was subsequently published.

more info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children…
http://youtu.be/OTuZMQt6w5c

Max Bruch

Max Bruch

Max Christian Friedrich Bruch (6 January 1838 – 2 October 1920), also known as Max Karl August Bruch,[1] was a German Romanticcomposer and conductor who wrote over 200 works, including three violin concertos, the first of which has become a staple of the violin repertory.

Life

Bruch was born in CologneRhine Province, where he received his early musical training under the composer and pianist Ferdinand Hiller, to whom Robert Schumann dedicated his piano concerto in A minor. Bohemian composer and piano virtuoso Ignaz Moscheles recognized his aptitude.

At the age of nine he wrote his first composition, a song for his mother’s birthday. From then on music was his passion, his studies enthusiastically supported by his parents. Many small early creative works included motets, psalm settings, piano pieces, violin sonatas, a string quartet and even orchestral works like the prelude to a planned opera “Joan of Arc”. Few of these early works have survived, however.

The first music theory lesson was in 1849 in Bonn by Professor Heinrich Carl Breidenstein, a friend of his father. At this time he stayed at estate in Bergisch Gladbach, where he wrote much of his music. The farm belonged to the lawyer and notary Neissen, who lived in it with his unmarried sister. Later the estate was bought by the Zanders family who owned a large paper mill. The young Bruch was taught by his father in French and English conversation. In later years, Mary Zanders became a friend and patron.

Bruch had a long career as a teacher, conductor and composer, moving among musical posts in Germany:Mannheim (1862–1864), Koblenz (1865–1867), Sondershausen, (1867–1870), Berlin (1870–1872), and Bonn, where he spent 1873–78 working privately. At the height of his career he spent three seasons as conductor of the Liverpool Philharmonic Society (1880–83). There he met his wife, Clara Tuczek. He taught composition at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik from 1890 until his retirement in 1910. Bruch died in his house in Berlin-Friedenau in 1920.

Max Bruch – Violin Concerto No.1 G minor Op.26 (Menuhin, 1961)


 

  1. VorspielAllegro moderato
  2. Adagio
  3. Finale: Allegro energico

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 Max Bruch‘s Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor, Op. 26, is one of the most popular violin concertos in the repertory. It continues to be performed and recorded by many violinists and is arguably Bruch’s most famous composition.[1]
History

The concerto was first completed in 1866 and the first performance was given on 24 April 1866 by Otto von Königslow with Bruch himself conducting. The concerto was then considerably revised with help from celebrated violinist Joseph Joachim and completed in its present form in 1867. The premiere of the revised concerto was given by Joachim in Bremen on 5 January 1868 with Karl Martin Rheinthaler conducting.[2]       More…