Tag Archives: Mexico

today’s birthday: Geronimo (1829)


Geronimo (1829)

When US authorities abolished the Chiricahua Reservation in 1876 and removed the Apaches to an arid region of New Mexico, Geronimo led a group of followers to Mexico. He was soon captured and returned to the new reservation, but escaped again with a group in 1881 and began leading them on raids. The cycle repeated again and again, until late in 1886, when Geronimo and the remainder of his forces surrendered for good. How is it that he ended up riding in Theodore Roosevelt’s inaugural procession? More… Discuss

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The Zimmermann Telegram


The Zimmermann Telegram

This secret note, sent by German foreign secretary Arthur Zimmermann to the German ambassador to the US, said that in the event of war, Mexico should be asked to join as a German ally in return for Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. British intelligence intercepted and deciphered the note and sent it to President Wilson. This helped turn US public opinion against Germany during WWI and strengthened advocates of US entry into the war. What was the British dilemma in disclosing the note to the US? More… Discuss

A lot of Love, poetic thought by George B. (the smudge and other poems Page) inspired and with dedication to ‘Como Agua Para Chocolate’, by the Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel


Lots of Love, poetic thought by George B.
(the smudge and other poems Page)

She first mixed the ingredients,
then added salt and sweat,
and other delicate things to the dough
she mixed and beat, and slammed and slammed
with powerful fists,
before

rolling
flattening
spreading the dough
on whole the top of the  board –
she did that many time…

Now  it all became quiet,
a quiet wait while

inside that silence the yeast was waking up the dough , 
engulfed in the mixture,
almost…ready to burst…

the oven preheated,

“time to open the gates to the baking heat”, she thought…

the moist heat of the oven –
time to release the moisture within –

let it float,
once more all around,  free,  in the boxed heat.

Now, all that was left was…cookies….while,
still very special, 

cookies,

with a sprinkle of Cinnamon
nutmeg
trace of… cloves
and  lots of love.

– George-B.

Inspired, and with dedication to Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel,   and her popular  novel Like Water for Chocolate (Spanish: Como agua para chocolate), the  popular novel published in 1989,  and the amazing magical realism by which  food is  one of the major themes in the story which is seen throughout the story. It is used very creatively to represent the characters feelings and situations.

Copyright © 2015 [George Bost]. All Rights Reserved.

 

this day in the yesteryear: William Semple Files Chewing Gum Patent (1869)


William Semple Files Chewing Gum Patent (1869)

Existing in various forms since prehistoric times, chewing gum is one of the oldest types of candy still widely consumed today. Early chewing gums were made from plant resins. In 1869, dentist William Semple patented a rubber-based chewing gum that he envisioned as a tooth cleaning product. Around that time, confectioners discovered that chicle, a natural latex that was being explored as a possible rubber substitute, was an ideal gum base. What country banned chewing gum in 1992? More… Discuss

The Saguaro


The Saguaro

The saguaro is a large, candelabra-shaped cactus that can grow up to 50 feet (15 m). Native to the deserts of Mexico and the southwestern US, it takes up to 75 years to develop but can live more than 200 years and can weigh up to 10 tons (9,000 kg). This mammoth typically dies by being uprooted by wind or washouts. It produces edible red fruits and white flowers that bloom at night but remain open into the next day. What are “saguaro boots,” and how have they been used by Native Americans? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Fiesta of Our Lady of Guadalupe


Fiesta of Our Lady of Guadalupe

Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe is the patron saint of Mexico, and on December 12, thousands of pilgrims flock to her shrine at the famous Church of Guadalupe outside Mexico City. On the evening of December 11, crowds gather for singing and special ceremonies at midnight, which are carried on national television. This great religious festival commemorates the appearance of the Virgin Mary on Tepeyac Hill, north of present-day Mexico City. The story is reenacted in a puppet show each year, and relics of Our Lady of Guadalupe are sold in the streets. More… Discuss

Saint of the Day for Sunday, November 23rd, 2014: Bl. Miguel Pro


Image of Bl. Miguel Pro

Bl. Miguel Pro

Born on January 13, 1891 in Guadalupe, Mexico, Miguel Agustin Pro Juarez was the eldest son of Miguel Pro and Josefa Juarez. Miguelito, as his doting family called him, was, from an early age, … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

The Monarch Butterfly


 

 

 

 

The Monarch Butterfly

 

 

 

English:

English: (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The monarch, with its distinctive orange and black pattern, is considered one the world’s most beautiful butterflies. In North America, thousands of monarchs gather in autumn and migrate southward, sometimes more than 1,800 miles (2,900 km), and return north in spring. Their ability to return to the same spots over several generations has led scientists to research how circadian rhythm and the position of the sun are involved. What is aposematism, and how do monarch butterflies exemplify it? More…

 

 

 

Discuss

 

 

 

this pressed for recognition: A US Marine wipes tears from his face as he kneels beside a body wrapped in a poncho during a firefight, 1966 — OnThisDay & Facts


this pressed: Austrian forensic experts may shed light on Mexico massacre | Reuters


Television cameramen walk at a garbage dump where remains were found outside the mountain town of Cocula, near Iguala in the southwestern state of Guerrero, November 8, 2014. REUTERS/Henry Romero

Television cameramen walk at a garbage dump where remains were found outside the mountain town of Cocula, near Iguala in the southwestern state of Guerrero, November 8, 2014. Credit: Reuters/Henry Romero

 

(Reuters) – Austrian forensics experts who helped solve the mystery of Russia’s murdered imperial family could soon shed light on the apparent massacre of 43 Mexican students through analysis of the tiniest of DNA fragments from badly burned remains.

The bodies of students abducted by corrupt police in Mexico six weeks ago were apparently burnt to ashes by drug gang members in an attempt to destroy the evidence.

Mexican authorities have said they would send the remains to Innsbruck‘s Medical University for DNA identification.

via Austrian forensic experts may shed light on Mexico massacre | Reuters.

quotation: Liberty: One of imagination’s most precious possessions (The Devil’s Dictionary). Ambrose Bierce


Liberty: One of imagination’s most precious possessions.

Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914) Discuss

this pressed: El Monte residents tell us how they envision their town — KCET-TV SoCal (@KCET)/Wikipedia


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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Day of the Dead (Spanish: Día de Muertos) is a Mexican holiday observed throughout Mexico and around the world in other cultures. The holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died. It is particularly celebrated in Mexico where the day is a bank holiday. The celebration takes place on October 31, November 1 and November 2, in connection with the triduum of Allhallowtide: All Hallows’ Eve, Hallowmas, and All Souls’ Day.[1][2] Traditions connected with the holiday include building private altars called ofrendas, honoring the deceased using sugar skulls, marigolds, and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed, and visiting graves with these as gifts. They also leave possessions of the deceased.

Scholars trace the origins of the modern Mexican holiday to indigenous observances dating back hundreds of years and to an Aztec festival dedicated to the goddess Mictecacihuatl. The holiday has spread throughout the world. In Brazil Dia de Finados is a public holiday that many Brazilians celebrate by visiting cemeteries and churches. In Spain there are festivals and parades and, at the end of the day, people gather at cemeteries and pray for their dead loved ones. Similar observances occur elsewhere in Europe, and similarly themed celebrations appear in many Asian and African cultures.

Day of the Dead
Catrinas 2.jpg

Representations of Catrina, one of the most popular figures of the Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexico
Observed by Mexico, and regions with large Hispanic populations
Type Cultural
Synthetic Christian
Significance Prayer and remembrance of friends and family members who have died
Celebrations Creation of altars to remember the dead, traditional day of the dead’s food
Begins October 31
Ends November 2
Date October 31
Next time 31 October 2014
Duration 3 days
Frequency annual
Related to Hallowmas

this day in the yesteryear: Revolution in Texas (1835)


Revolution in Texas (1835)

In 1821, the US began to colonize Texas. The newly independent Mexican government, pleased with the prospering US colony, offered grants to other American promoters. By 1830, Americans greatly outnumbered the Mexican settlers. To stop the influx of Americans, Mexican troops began to police the border and close seaports. Alarmed Texans petitioned Mexico for separate statehood, to no avail. On October 2, 1835, the revolution broke out when the Mexicans asked the Texans to return what item? More… Discuss

story: Windsor Castle


English: Photograph of Windsor castle showing ...

English: Photograph of Windsor castle showing visitors. Taken Summer 1989 by contributor. All rights waived. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Windsor Castle

Located in the county of Berkshire, west of London, Windsor Castle has been a principal official residence of British monarchs since the 11th century. The Queen herself is quite fond of Windsor and frequently weekends there. Windsor has the distinction of being the oldest and largest occupied castle in the world. The modern castle, which contains about 1,000 rooms and occupies 13 acres (5 hectares), consists of three “wards”—the upper, middle, and lower. What damaged more than 100 rooms in 1992? More… Discuss

“Stairway to Heaven” live (Rodrigo y Gabriela)


today’s holiday: Día de los Charros


Día de los Charros

Today’s Mexican charros are more sportsmen than cowboys or ranchers. On September 14, the day before the Mexico Festival of Independence, many of the charro associations organize parades and rodeos. The jaripeo, or rodeo, generally consists of 10 or more events involving special horse-handling skills and exhibitions of various tricks. Perhaps the most difficult trick is the paso de la muerte (death’s pass), in which the charro pursues a wild horse, switching from his own horse’s saddle to the back of the wild horse at full gallop. More… Discuss

Filigree


Filigree

Filigree is an ornamental work of fine gold or silver wire, often wrought into an openwork design and joined with matching solder under the flame of a blowpipe. It was made in ancient Egypt, China, and India. Saxons, Britons, and especially the Celts in Ireland were skilled at devising intricate and ingenious designs in the Middle Ages. Today, it is employed in Mediterranean areas, as well as in Mexico, India, and Scandinavian countries. What is the origin of the word “filigree“? More… Discuss

The Irish Potato Famine


The Irish Potato Famine

By the early 1840s, nearly half of the Irish population, particularly the rural poor, depended almost entirely on the potato for sustenance. The Irish Potato Famine, which lasted from 1845 to 1849, led to the deaths of more than a million people from starvation or famine-related diseases. A watershed moment in Ireland’s demographic history, it also provoked a massive exodus, and the British government‘s minimal relief efforts worsened Anglo-Irish relations. What caused the potato crop to fail? More… Discuss

Global Audit of Violence against Children Paints Grim Picture


Global Audit of Violence against Children Paints Grim Picture

By the age of 20, one in 10 girls has been raped or sexually assaulted, according to new UN figures, while a third of the world’s 15- to 19-year-old girls who have been in cohabiting relationships have suffered emotional, physical, or sexual violence at the hands of their husbands or partners. Boys are also often the victims of sexual violence, though to a lesser extent than girls. For both genders, cyber-victimization is the most common form of sexual violence. Other forms of violence against children are also pervasive, regardless of age, region, religion, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status. More… Discuss

Central America Unaccompanied Child: Migration United Nations Report


Central America Unaccompanied Child Migration

NO WAY: Overpopulation


FROM WIKIPEDIA:  Overpopulation

Population growth that exceeds the carrying capacity of an area or environment results in overpopulation.[21] Spikes in human population can cause problems such as pollution, water crisis,[22][23] and poverty.[24][25] World population has grown from 1.6 billion in 1900 to an estimated 7 billion today. In Mexico alone, population has grown from 13.6 million in 1900 to 107 million in 2007.[26] Virginia Abernethy notes that immigration is a road that provides a “relief valve” to overpopulation that stops a population from addressing the consequences of its overpopulation and that exports this overpopulation to another location or country.[27]

In 2000, the United Nations estimated that the world’s population was growing at the rate of 1.14% (or about 75 million people) per year. According to data from the CIA’s World Factbook, the world human population currently increases by 145 every minute.[28] The United States Census Bureau issued a revised forecast for world population that increased its projection for the year 2050 to above 9.4 billion people, up from 9.1 billion people. There are a billion more added every 12 years. Almost all growth will take place in the less developed regions.[29]

Using the Cloud to Track Migrant Workers and Pregnant Goats – Bloomberg


Employers of Mexican immigrants in the U.S. can have a tough time following the rules. They need to track each employee’s immigration forms, workers’ compensation, labor disputes, health-care options and more. The complex system is partly why many choose to look the other way when workers apply without legal documentation.

Veg Packer, a Mexico– and California-based farm owner employing more than 1,000 workers, used basic Excel spreadsheets to log the information for years. Managers would grumble about receiving e-mails with out-of-date files and missing attachments.

via Using the Cloud to Track Migrant Workers and Pregnant Goats – Bloomberg.

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: Cinco de Mayo


Cinco de Mayo

Cinco de Mayo, or the Fifth of May, is a national holiday in Mexico commemorating the Battle of Puebla on May 5, 1862, in which Mexican troops under General Ignacio Zaragoza defeated the invading French forces of Napoleon III. The anniversary of this event is celebrated not only in Mexico but in many American communities with large Mexican-American populations—especially in the southwestern states of Texas, Arizona, and southern California. The events include parades, patriotic speeches, bullfights, barbecues, and beauty contests. More… Discuss

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Wikipedia:Today’s featured article/April 21, 2014


Wikipedia:Today’s featured article/April 21, 2014

 
Hurricane Kiko

Hurricane Kiko was one of the strongest tropical cyclones to ever make landfall on the eastern coast of the Baja California Peninsula. The eleventh named storm of the 1989 Pacific hurricane season, Kiko formed out of a large mesoscale convective system on August 25. Slowly tracking northwestward, the storm rapidly intensified into a hurricane early the next day. Strengthening continued until early August 27, when Kiko reached its peak intensity with winds of 120 mph (195 km/h). The storm turned west at this time, and at around 0600 UTC, the storm made landfall near Punta Arena on the southern tip of Baja California. The hurricane rapidly weakened into a tropical storm later that day and further into a tropical depression by August 28, shortly after entering the Pacific Ocean. The depression persisted for another day while tracking southward, before being absorbed by nearby Tropical Storm Lorena. Though Kiko made landfall as a Category 3 hurricane, its impact was relatively minor. Press reports indicated that 20 homes were destroyed and numerous highways were flooded by torrential rains. (Full article…)

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: OCTAVIO PAZ (1914)


Octavio Paz (1914)

Paz was a Mexican poet, critic, and diplomat, and the winner of the 1990 Nobel Prize in Literature. He wrote with a revealing depth of insight, elegance, and erudition that place him among the generation’s best writers. Influenced by Marxism, surrealism, existentialism, Buddhism, and Hinduism, his poetry uses rich imagery to deal with his most prominent theme: the human ability to overcome existential solitude through love and creativity. Paz was born in Mexico City during what political event?More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE TREATY OF GUADALUPE HIDALGO IS SIGNED (1848)


The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo Is Signed (1848)

A border dispute sparked by the US annexation of Texas in 1845 soon led to all-out war between the two countries. Under the terms of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo that ended the war, Mexico confirmed US claims to Texas and ceded lands constituting present-day California, Nevada, and Utah, and parts of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Wyoming in exchange for an indemnity of $15 million and US assumption of American claims against Mexico. How did the US’s victory precipitate its Civil War?More… Discuss

 

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: FEAST OF ST. ANTHONY THE ABBOT


Feast of St. Anthony the Abbot

St. Anthony the Abbot was one of the earliest saints, and, if St. Athanasius‘s biography of him is correct, Anthony lived more than 100 years (251–356). He eventually came to be regarded as a healer of animals as well as of people. His feast day is celebrated in Mexico and other parts of Latin America by bringing household pets and livestock into the churchyard, where the local priest blesses them with holy water. All the animals are carefully groomed and often decorated with ribbons and fresh flowers. In some Latin American cities, the Blessing of the Animals takes place on a different day—often on Holy Saturday, the day before Easter.More…

 

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Today’s Birthday: VENUSTIANO CARRANZA (1859)


Venustiano Carranza (1859)

After Mexican leader Porfirio Díaz was deposed in 1911, a protracted power struggle ensued. Carranza was the third person in as many years to assume executive power after Díaz’s ouster, but revolutionary leaders Pancho Villa and Emiliano Zapata objected and responded with force. Carranza prevailed, but his failure to implement key provisions of the liberal constitution of 1917 led to further unrest, and he was killed in 1920. What does carrancear, coined during Carranza’s tenure, mean? More…Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: E NIGHT OF TLATELOLCO (1968)


The Night of Tlatelolco (1968)

Just 10 days before Mexico City hosted the 1968 Summer Olympics, government forces opened fire on student and civilian protesters gathered in a plaza in the Tlatelolco section of the city. The official government explanation was that students provoked the army’s violence by firing at them from the buildings surrounding the plaza and that only four people had been killed. Investigations were thwarted until Vicente Fox became president in 2000. What is now believed to have happened that day? More… Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: EUROPEAN EXPLORER JUAN RODRÍGUEZ CABRILLO DISCOVERS CALIFORNIA (1542)


European Explorer Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo Discovers California (1542)

In 1520, Cabrillo, an explorer in the service of Spain, landed in Mexico and joined in the conquests of Mexico and Guatemala. Some 20 years later, he accompanied an expedition up the west coast of Mexico, assuming its command after the death of its original commander. He then proceeded to explore much of the coast of what is now the state of California, becoming the first European to do so. How far north did he get before complications from a broken bone, possibly gangrene, took his life? More… Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: MEXICO CITY EARTHQUAKE (1985)


Mexico City Earthquake (1985)

At 7:18 AM, an 8.1-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of the Mexican state of Michoacán, releasing more than 1,000 times the energy of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima. Several hundred miles away in Mexico‘s capital, Mexico City, the devastation was catastrophic. Official estimates place the death toll at 10,000, but several times that number may have actually perished. Tens of thousands of others were hurt and hundreds of thousands were left homeless. Why was Mexico City so hard hit? More…Discuss

 

THE GRITO DEThis Day in the Yesrteryear: DOLORES: BATTLE CRY OF MEXICAN WAR OF INDEPENDENCE (1810)


The Grito de Dolores: Battle Cry of Mexican War of Independence (1810)

The revolutionary movements in the US and France did not go unnoticed in Mexico, which had been subjugated by Spain centuries earlier. When Napoleon invaded Spain in 1808, many Mexicans saw an opportunity to claim their own freedom. In 1810, revolutionary priest Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla launched the Mexican War of Independence with his Grito de Dolores—”Cry of Dolores”—a call to freedom that roused the peasants to action and became their battle cry. How is the event commemorated today? More… Discuss