Tag Archives: Michael Halász

Franz Schubert – Symphony No.2 in B-flat major, D.125 (1815): make music part of your life series



***from  KuhlauDilfeng2  KuhlauDilfeng2

Franz SchubertSymphony No.2 in B-flat major, D.125 (1815)

***Picture: Carlo Bossoli – Abendliches Vergnügen vor den Toren Konstantinopels

***Franz Schubert:  Symphony No.2 in B-flat major, D.125 (1815)

Mov.I: Largo – Allegro vivace 00:00
Mov.II: Andante 14:07
Mov.III: Menuetto: Allegro vivace 22:20
Mov.IV: Presto vivace 25:32

***Orchestra: Failoni Orchestra
***Conductor: Michael Halász

In the opening movement, the initial theme of the Allegro vivace is based on the corresponding first theme of Ludwig van Beethoven’s overture to The Creatures of Prometheus.

The second movement is a theme with five variations in E flat major. Although there is some variation in the melody, the primary focus of the variations are on instrumentation and tone color. The first variation features violins and winds. The second variation passes the theme between the low strings and the woodwinds. The third variation is again violins and winds. The fourth variation is in C minor and features some acceleration with the use triplet-sixteenth notes. The fifth variation maintains the triplet-sixteenths, but they move into the background with the melody returning close to its original form as a kind of recapitulation. A coda concludes the movement.

The minuet is in C minor and mainly scored for the tutti and fortissimo. The contrasting Trio in E flat major is more thinly scored winds, violins and pizzicato bass. The melody of the trio is actually a variation of the theme used in the second movement forming a melodic and harmonic (E-flat/C minor) link is made between the inner two movements.

The finale is a galop in fast 2/4 time.

***From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

List of compositions by Franz Schubert by genre

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUOR LIFE SERIES: Symphony No.3 in D-major, D.200 (1815)


[youtube.com/watch?v=FLlKgu1sx4s]

Franz Schubert – Symphony No.3 in D-major, D.200 (1815)

Picture: Carlo Bossoli – Paris Bourse

Mov.I: Adagio maestoso – Allegro con brio 00:00
Mov.II: Allegretto 09:35
Mov.III: Menuetto: Vivace 13:54
Mov.IV: Presto vivace 18:04

Orchestra: Failoni Orchestra

Conductor: Michael Halász

The Allegro con brio, which follows a broad introduction in a form which reminds us of the French Overture in two parts, the first slow and dramatic, the second more lyrical, is remarkable for its charm and the interplay of solo clarinet with syncopated strings, which developed pp from within the bounds of the style of chamber music to the larger sphere of the symphonic form. This is an extremely dramatic movement in sonata form. It owes much, as Michael Trapp points out in the liner notes of Günter Wand’s recording, to the influence of Rossini, whose music was quite popular at the time, particularly evident in the overture-like structure.

A delightful Allegretto in ternary form follows, full of grace and humor.

Then comes a high-spirited Minuet, which, with its accented up-beats, suggests a scherzo and a popular flavor due to this low and popular gesture, and is contrasted by a graceful Ländler-like trio.

The concluding Presto in tarantella rhythm is remarkable for its bold harmonic progressions and for its wealth of dynamic contrast. This movement is in sonata form with a looser conception.

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Great Compositions/Performances: Franz Schubert – Symphony No.1 in D-major, D.82 (1813)



Picture: Carlo Bossoli – A Bustling Market on the Piazza Navona in Rome

Franz Schubert 

Work: Symphony No.1 in D-major, D.82 (1813)

Mov.I: Adagio – Allegro vivace 00:00
Mov.II: Andante 11:47
Mov.III: Menuetto: Allegretto 19:17
Mov.IV: Allegro vivace 23:30

Orchestra: Failoni Orchestra

Conductor: Michael Halász

The symphony is scored for 1 flute, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in D, 2 trumpets in D, timpani and strings. 

The orchestration, which is balanced between strings and winds, lends itself to small chamber orchestras, as well as larger ensembles. The trumpets are scored particularly high, as in many of Schubert’s early works. Trumpet players will find, in general, the tessitura sitting between a concert D to Concert A for most of the 1st and 4th movements. In the 4th movement, Schubert pushes them up to a high D, in a repeated fashion. 

Some careful planning is needed to balance the multiple doublings between horns and trumpets.

 

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