Tag Archives: Miguel Llobet

Enrique Granados. Valses poeticos by Mircea Gogoncea: make music part of your life series


Enrique Granados. Valses poeticos by Mircea Gogoncea

1.Victoria de los Angeles,´´el mirar de la maja“, Enrique Granados, Gerald Moore (make music part of your life series)


1.Victoria de los Angeles,´´el mirar de la maja“, Enrique Granados, Gerald Moore

Enrique Granados (1867-1916) was fascinated during his whole life by Goya´s paintings of majos and majas of the 18th century. He himself used to paint . Fernando Periquet, his librettist, had also written for the composer twelve poems on this subject. Granados set them in music in 1912 as ´´Tonadillas (solos with guitar) en un estilo antigo“.I love Granados´ (who was Catalan, by the way) overtly national music elements which are always defeated by his romantic melancholy.

Gerald Moore,  piano

Painting: Francisco Goya, 1746-1828, portrait of Francisca Sabasa y García, 1804-1808, National Gallery, Washington

make music part of your life series: Stefano Grondona plays E. Granados: Danza n.5 “Andaluza”


[youtube.com/watch?v=hFTWjEqBQAg]

Stefano Grondona plays E. Granados: Danza n.5 “Andaluza”

The famous Italian guitar player Stefano Grondona plays “Danza Española n.5 ‘Andaluza'”, composed by Enrique Granados (1867-1916), original for piano, here in a transcription for guitar by Miguel Llobet (1878-1938). This is a part of a concert in Barcelona in 2006.

Dimitre Peev – Anon – Spanish Romance


“Romance Anónimo” (Anonymous Romance) is a piece for guitar, also known as “Estudio en Mi de Rubira” (Study in E by Rubira), “Spanish Romance”, “Romance de España”, “Romance of the Guitar”, “Romanza” and “Romance d’Amour” among other names.
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_(song)

Its origins and authorship are currently in question. It is suspected of originally being a solo instrumental guitar work, from the 19th century. It has variously been attributed to Antonio Rubira, David del Castillo[1], Francisco Tárrega, Fernando Sor, Daniel Fortea, Miguel Llobet, Antonio Cano, Vicente Gómez and Narciso Yepes. The Anónimo (anonymous) part of its name has been incorporated over the years due to this uncertainty. The question of authorship has probably been propagated by three main reasons: the lack of claim by its true author, the desire to avoid paying copyright fees, and the desire of publishing companies to claim the lucrative copyright of this world-famous song.[2]

The style of the piece is that of the Parlour music of the late 19th century in Spain or South America, having a closed three-part form: the first in the minor key and the second being in the major key, with the third being a restatement of the first.