Tag Archives: Milky Way

today’s Image: Jules Verne (Image ArtToday)



Jules Verne

French author Jules Verne, born on February 8, 1828, is considered the father of science fiction. Many of his 19th-century works forecast amazing scientific feats–feats that were actually carried out in the 20th century–with uncanny accuracy. Verne’s 1865 book From the Earth to the Moon told the story of a space ship that is launched from Florida to the moon and that returns to Earth by landing in the ocean. An illustration from the original version of the book is shown above. Something of a scientist and traveler himself, Verne’s 1870 work about a submarine, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, and Around the World in Eighty Days also foretold technological advances that seemed fantastic at the time. Jules Verne died in 1905.

Image ArtToday

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.lnUNkvGi.dpuf

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Happy Birthday Mozart: Eine kleine Nachtmusik KV 525 Karl Bohm, Wiener Philharmoniker , great compositions/performances


Mozart, Eine kleine Nachtmusik KV 525 Karl Bohm, Wiener Philharmoniker

 

Antonio Stradella – Sonata a-moll, theme with 24 variazions. (Messier globular clusters): make music part of your life series


Antonio Stradella – Sonata a-moll, theme with 24 variazions. (Messier globular clusters)

ARTICLE: MESSIER OBJECTS


Messier Objects

In 1784, French astronomer Charles Messier compiled a list of non-stellar celestial objects. He had no understanding of what these items—now known to be galaxies, nebulae, and star clusters—actually were; he just wanted to further the search for comets by listing the indistinct objects that might be mistaken for them. Designations from his catalog are still used to refer to some nebulae and star clusters—for instance, M1 is the Crab Nebula and M45 is the Pleiades. What is a “Messier Marathon“? More… Discuss

 

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