Tag Archives: Modest Mussorgsky

Rimsky-Korsakov – Russian Easter Festival Overture, Op. 36 Conductor: Zubin Mehta Orchestra: Israel Philharmonic Orchestra


Rimsky-Korsakov – Russian Easter Festival Overture, Op. 36

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Historic musical bits, Mozart Violin Concerto N°4 in D major, K218. David Oistrakh, violin, great compositons/performances


Mozart Violin Concerto N°4 in D major, K 218. David Oistrakh, violin )

Borodin In the Steppes of Central Asia – Svetlanov , great compositions/performances


Borodin In the Steppes of Central Asia – Svetlanov

Alexander Borodin – String Quartet No. 2: make music part of your life series


Alexander Borodin – String Quartet No. 2

MUSSORGSKY (arr. Stokowski) Night on Bald Mountain: great compositions/performances


MUSSORGSKY (arr. Stokowski) Night on Bald Mountain

Here is Leopold Stokowski‘s (1882-1977) transcription of Modest Mussorgsky‘s “Night on Bald Mountain”. This is the version most famously featured as the ending sequence of the Disney film “Fantasia” (1948), and that most famously caused quite an uproar among movie-goers due to the demonic imagery used in the aforementioned clip.

Stokowski was a prodigy along the lines of Maazel, entering into the Royal Academy of Music to study composition and conducting at the age of merely 13. During his long span as one of the most prominent and important conductors (not to mention one of the greatest) he was actually a very controversial figure. What many people probably don’t know is that Stokowski was a great champion of contemporary music, giving the U.S. and/or world premieres of works by Elgar, Vaughn Williams, Prokofiev, Schoenberg, Hovhaness, Copland, Barber, Berg, Feldman and other contemporary composers. He is also very important to the history of modern concert practice as well, popularizing the batonless technique of conducting, as well as inventing and popularizing the “pops concert” and the modern chairing of a symphony orchestra. He was able to produce what was then referred to as “the Stokowski Sound”, although what is now called “the Philly Sound” (one of the many, illustrious orchestras he was resident conductor for), and was the greatest influence on many conductors proceeding him, particularly Leonard Bernstein. His transcriptions and editing of works were considered uncoif at the time, a practice that had long since become outdated as printed music became more available, but they are now one of the things he is best-known for, particularly this and his orchestration of Bach’s Toccata en Fugue in D Minor BWV 565.

Performed here in 1966 by the London Symphony Orchestra.

Modest Mussorgsky: Dawn on the Moskva-River: Make music part of your life series


Mussorgsky Dawn on the Moskva-River

Mussorgsky “Pictures at an Exhibition” arr: Stokowski: great compositions/performances


Mussorgsky “Pictures at an Exhibition” arr: Stokowski

Modest Mussorgsky “Pictures at an Exhibition” Celibidache London Symphony Orchestra, conductor: Sergiu Celibidache: great compositions/performances


Modest Mussorgsky “Pictures at an Exhibition” Celibidache London Symphony Orchestra,  conductor: Sergiu Celibidache

Modest Mussorgsky – Saint John’s Night on the Bare Mountain (Original score) / Abbado – LSO: great compositions/performances



FROM:   Panagiotis Papadakos  Panagiotis Papadakos

Modest Mussorgsky – Saint John’s Night on the Bare Mountain (Original score) / Abbado – LSO

The original Mussorgsky score (1867) and not the Rimsky Korsakov one (1886).

From wikipedia:
Night on Bald Mountain is a composition by Modest Mussorgsky that exists in, at least, two versions—a seldom performed 1867 version or a later (1886) and very popular “fantasy for orchestra” arranged by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, A Night on the Bare Mountain (Ночь на лысой горе, Noch’ na lysoy gorye), based on the vocal score of the “Dream Vision of the Peasant Lad” (1880) from The Fair at Sorochyntsi with some revisions, most notably the omission of the choir.[citation needed] There is also a version orchestrated by twentieth-century conductor Leopold Stokowski; this is the version used in the now-classic 1940 Walt Disney animated film Fantasia.

Inspired by Russian literary works and legend, Mussorgsky made a witches’ sabbath the theme of the original tone poem, completed on 23 June 1867 (St. John’s Eve). St. John’s Night on the Bare Mountain and Rimsky-Korsakov’s “musical picture” Sadko (also composed in 1867) share the distinction of being the first tone poems by Russian composers.

As with so much of Mussorgsky’s music, the work had a tortuous compositional history and was arranged after his death in 1881 by his friend and fellow member of The Mighty Handful Rimsky-Korsakov. It was never performed in any form during Mussorgsky’s lifetime.[2] The Rimsky-Korsakov edition premiered in 1886, and has become a concert favorite.

Setting:
Russian legend tells of a witches’ sabbath taking place on St. John’s Night (June 23–24) on the Lysa Hora (Bald Mountain), near Kiev.

Program:
The following program is taken from the score: Сбор ведьм, их толки и сплетни (Assembly of the witches, their chatter and gossip) Поезд Сатаны (Cortège of Satan) Чёрная служба, Messe noire (Black service, Black mass) Шабаш (Sabbath)

More details and a variation to this program may be found in a letter written by the composer to Vladimir Nikolsky: “So far as my memory doesn’t deceive me, the witches used to gather on this mountain, gossip, play tricks and await their chief — Satan. On his arrival they, i.e. the witches, formed a circle round the throne on which he sat, in the form of a kid, and sang his praise. When Satan was worked up into a sufficient passion by the witches’ praises, he gave the command for the sabbath, in which he chose for himself the witches who caught his fancy. –So this is what I’ve done.
At the head of my score I’ve put its content:
1. Assembly of the witches, their talk and gossip;
2. Satan’s journey;
3. Obscene praises of Satan; and
4. Sabbath… The form and character of the composition are both Russian and original”.

great compositions/performances: Mussorgsky: Pictures at an exhibition ( Full ) – BPO / Karajan*


[youtube.com/watch?v=kkC3chi_ysw]

Mussorgsky: Pictures at an exhibition ( Full ) – BPO / Karajan*

Herbert Von Karajan for PIFAL

Herbert Von Karajan for PIFAL (Photo credit: Arturo Espinosa)

With the original survived pictures of Hartmann and others

Modest Mussorgsky – Saint John’s Night on the Bare Mountain (Original score) / Abbado – LSO



The original Mussorgsky score (1867) and not the Rimsky Korsakov one (1886).

From wikipedia:
Night on Bald Mountain is a composition by Modest Mussorgsky that exists in, at least, two versions—a seldom performed 1867 version or a later (1886) and very popular “fantasy for orchestra” arranged by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, A Night on the Bare Mountain (Ночь на лысой горе, Noch’ na lysoy gorye), based on the vocal score of the “Dream Vision of the Peasant Lad” (1880) from The Fair at Sorochyntsi with some revisions, most notably the omission of the choir.[citation needed] There is also a version orchestrated by twentieth-century conductor Leopold Stokowski; this is the version used in the now-classic 1940 Walt Disney animated film Fantasia.

Inspired by Russian literary works and legend, Mussorgsky made a witches’ sabbath the theme of the original tone poem, completed on 23 June 1867 (St. John’s Eve). St. John’s Night on the Bare Mountain and Rimsky-Korsakov’s “musical picture” Sadko (also composed in 1867) share the distinction of being the first tone poems by Russian composers.

As with so much of Mussorgsky’s music, the work had a tortuous compositional history and was arranged after his death in 1881 by his friend and fellow member of The Mighty Handful Rimsky-Korsakov. It was never performed in any form during Mussorgsky’s lifetime.[2] The Rimsky-Korsakov edition premiered in 1886, and has become a concert favorite.

Setting:
Russian legend tells of a witches’ sabbath taking place on St. John’s Night (June 23–24) on the Lysa Hora (Bald Mountain), near Kiev.

Program:
The following program is taken from the score: Сбор ведьм, их толки и сплетни (Assembly of the witches, their chatter and gossip) Поезд Сатаны (Cortège of Satan) Чёрная служба, Messe noire (Black service, Black mass) Шабаш (Sabbath)

More details and a variation to this program may be found in a letter written by the composer to Vladimir Nikolsky: “So far as my memory doesn’t deceive me, the witches used to gather on this mountain, gossip, play tricks and await their chief — Satan. On his arrival they, i.e. the witches, formed a circle round the throne on which he sat, in the form of a kid, and sang his praise. When Satan was worked up into a sufficient passion by the witches’ praises, he gave the command for the sabbath, in which he chose for himself the witches who caught his fancy. –So this is what I’ve done. At the head of my score I’ve put its content: 1. Assembly of the witches, their talk and gossip; 2. Satan’s journey; 3. Obscene praises of Satan; and 4. Sabbath… The form and character of the composition are both Russian and original”.

 

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Great Composers/Compositions: Edvard Grieg. Symphonic Dances No.1



Youth Symphony Orchestra Mussorgsky College of St. Petersburg
Conductor Lev Dunaev
Молодёжный симфонический оркестр музыкального колледжа им.М.П.Мусоргского (Санкт-Петербург)
Дирижёр Лев Дунаев
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Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Rimsky-Korsakov – Russian Easter Festival Overture, Op. 36



Also known as The Great Russian Easter Overture, is a concert overture written by the Russian composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov between August 1887 and April 1888, and dedicated to the memories of Modest Mussorgsky and Alexander Borodin, two members of the legendary “Mighty Handful“.

It is subtitled “Overture on Liturgical Themes”. It is the last of the composer’s series of three exceptionally brilliant orchestral works, preceded by Capriccio Espagnol and Scheherazade. The work received its premiere in St. Petersburg in late December 1888.

Conductor: Zubin Mehta 
Orchestra: Israel Philharmonic Orchestra

Picture: Il’ja Efimovič Repin, Easter Procession in the region of Kursk (1880-1883)

 

Modest Mussorgsky / Maurice Ravel – Pictures at an Exhibition



Pictures at an Exhibition (Russian: Картинки с выставки — Воспоминание о Викторе Гартмане, Kartinki s vystavki — Vospominaniye o Viktore Gartmane, “Pictures from an Exhibition — A Remembrance of Viktor Hartmann“) is a suite composed for piano by Russian composer Modest Mussorgsky in 1874.

The suite is Mussorgsky’s most famous piano composition, and has become a showpiece for virtuoso pianists. It has become further known through various orchestrations and arrangements produced by other musicians and composers, with Ravel‘s arrangement being the most recorded and performed.

It was probably in 1870 that Mussorgsky met artist and architect Viktor Hartmann. Both men were devoted to the cause of an intrinsically Russian art and quickly became friends. 
Hartmann died from an aneurysm in 1873. The sudden loss of the artist, aged only 39, shook Mussorgsky along with others in Russia’s art world. Stasov helped organize an exhibition of over 400 Hartmann works in the Academy of Fine Arts in Saint Petersburg, Russia in February and March 1874. Mussorgsky lent works from his personal collection to the exhibit and viewed the show in person. Fired by the experience, he composed Pictures at an Exhibition in six weeks.

Mussorgsky based his musical material on drawings and watercolours by Hartmann produced mostly during the artist’s travels abroad. Locales include Poland, France and Italy; the final movement depicts an architectural design for the capital city of Ukraine.

Movements:

0:00   I. Promenade 
1:41    II. Gnomus 
4:15    III. Promenade 
5:14    IV. Il vecchio castello 
9:37    V. Promenade 
10:11   VI. Tuileries 
11:14   VII. Bydło 
14:13   VIII. Promenade 
14:57   IX. Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks 
16:16   X. “Samuel” Goldenberg und “Schmuÿle” 
18:17    XI. Limoges, le marché 
19:46   XII. Catacombæ (Sepulcrum romanum) and “Cum mortuis in   lingua mortua” 
23:29   XIII. The Hut on Fowl’s Legs (Baba-Yagá) 
27:06   XIV. The Great Gate of Kiev 

Conductor: Jean-Claude Casadeus
Orchestra: Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
Picture: Portrait of Modest Mussorgsky – Ilya Repin.

 

Mussorgsky: Pictures At An Exhibition-“Baba Yaga”,”Great gate of Kiew”



The Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra under the baton from Eckehard Stier performed Mussorgsky‘s Pictures at an exhibition and the highlights “Baba Yaga and “The great Gate from Kiev” live at Auckland Town Hall in February 2010.

Mussorgski: “Night on Bald Mountain”, conductor Leopold Stokowski With London Symphony Orchestra-1966.


Night On Bald Mountain is a composition by Modest Mussorgsky that exists in, at least, two versions—a seldom performed 1867 version or a later (1886) and very popular “fantasy for orchestra” arranged by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, A Night on the Bare Mountain (Ночь на лысой горе, Noch’ na lysoy gorye), based on the vocal score of the “Dream Vision of the Peasant Lad” (1880) from The Fair at Sorochyntsi with some revisions, most notably the omission of the choir. There is also a version orchestrated by twentieth-century conductor Leopold Stokowski; this is the version used in the now-classic 1940 Walt Disney animated film Fantasia.

Inspired by Russian literary works and legend, Mussorgsky made a witches’ sabbath the theme of the original tone poem, completed on 23 June 1867 (St. John’s Eve). St. John’s Night on the Bare Mountain and Rimsky-Korsakov’s “musical picture” Sadko (also composed in 1867) share the distinction of being the first tone poems by Russian composers.

As with so much of Mussorgsky’s music, the work had a tortuous compositional history and was arranged after his death in 1881 by his friend and fellow member of The Mighty Handful Rimsky-Korsakov. It was never performed in any form during Mussorgsky’s lifetime. The Rimsky-Korsakov edition premiered in 1886, and has become a concert favorite.

Note on the title: The Russian word “лысая” (lïsaya) literally means “bald”, but is used in this case figuratively for a mountain supposedly barren of trees. In English, the titles A Night on the Bare Mountain or Night on Bald Mountain are used.
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Night_on_Bald_Mountain)