Tag Archives: Montana

Libby Montana, Dust To Dust, A Documentary About Zonolite


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libby,_Montana

When Loyers are disloyal: But then When is a loyer loyal ? In one situation only and if you cannot figure that out for yourself…I’ m not gonna spoon feed anybody.

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this day in the yesteryear: The “Trial of the Century” Begins (1935)


The “Trial of the Century” Begins (1935)

Bruno Hauptmann, a German immigrant to the US, was convicted and sentenced to death for the kidnapping and murder of Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Jr., the young son of famed pilot Charles Lindbergh. Hauptmann had been found with part of the ransom money, but the case against him has since come under scrutiny. It has been alleged that some of the evidence used to convict him was planted and that false testimony was given at the trial. What was discovered in 1985 that shed new light on the case? More… Discuss

Purcell – Ode to St. Cecilia (Z.328): I-II: make music part of your life series


Purcell – Ode to St. Cecilia (Z.328): I-II


ARTICLE: ASBESTOS (SPECIAL CLIP FROM “DUST TO DUST” ON TREMOLITE ASBESTOS AND MESOTHELIOMA VICTIMS IN LIBBY, MONTANA)


Asbestos

Nowadays, the idea of being exposed to asbestos strikes fear in the hearts of most. But just a couple of generations ago, people embraced asbestos-containing materials for their fire-and corrosion-resistant properties. Asbestos—a product obtained from a family of fibrous hydrated silicates—was used in fireproofing, electrical insulation, and various other building materials as well as safety apparel, brake pads, and countless other products. When was it discovered to be a serious health hazardMore… Discuss

In this short scene from our feature documentary, LIBBY, MONTANA, three former WR Grace employees talk about what it was like to work for the company in Libby. Les Skramstad worked in the mill only two years, but died of mesothelioma in 2007. Bob Wilkins was the local union rep for mine workers. He died of asbestos related disease in 2002. Dru Carr and I shot the interviews with Les and Bob in 2000. Earl Lovick was the plant manager for many years. His commentary here is from a videotaped deposition recorded during a civil case against WR Grace in the 1990s. Lovick died in 1996. For more information about the film, trailers, audio downloads, external links, reviews, blogs and more please visit the two official web pages for the movie: http://www.highplainsfilms.org/fp_lib…http://www.pbs.org/pov/pov2007/libbym…

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THE DOG ATE MY…


The Dog Ate My…

The “dog ate it” excuse may not cut it in the classroom, but the US Treasury is apparently more receptive to this explanation than the typical schoolteacher, and for that at least one person can be grateful. A Montana man who mailed in the remnants of what he claimed were five $100 bills eaten by his one-eyed dog received a $500 check to replace the currency. The pet owner was nothing if not committed, following his dog around for days after the incident, collecting its droppings and eventually picking out and washing the digested bill fragments. Unpleasant as they were, his efforts ultimately paid off. More… Discuss

 

Democracy Now: Asbestos in Libby Montana, and elsewhere


Democracy Now_asbestos_Libby-Montana

Democracy Now_asbestos_Libby-Montana (click on the picture to watch the video and read the story)

Montana: Regulators Knew Contaminated Bark Was Being Sold in Asbestos-Tainted Town

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In Montana, the Associated Press has revealed federal regulators knew potentially contaminated bark and wood chips were being sold from a Superfund site in the asbestos-tainted town of Libby, Montana, for three years before they stopped the practice. The contaminated wood chips were placed in yards, city parks, outside schools and at the local cemetery. Asbestos from a W.R. Grace mine in Libby has killed an estimated 400 people and sickened at least 1,750 people.

Today’s Bithday: Calamity Jane (1852)


Calamity Jane (1852)

Born Martha Jane Canary, Calamity Jane was a legendary American frontierswoman. She grew up in Montana and worked in mining camps, where she acquired riding and shooting skills. In 1876, she appeared in Deadwood, South Dakota, the site of new gold strikes, boasting of her marksmanship and her exploits as a pony-express rider and as a scout with Custer’s forces. It was there that she likely met Wild Bill Hickok, who would become her companion. How did Jane claim to have acquired her nickname? More… Discuss