Tag Archives: Moon

this day in the yesteryear: New York Sun Publishes “The Great Moon Hoax” (1835)


New York Sun Publishes “The Great Moon Hoax” (1835)

“The Great Moon Hoax” was a series of six New York Sun articles discussing the supposed discovery of life on the Moon. The discovery—allegedly made using a massive telescope—was falsely attributed to famed astronomer Sir John Herschel. In the articles, the author claims that unicorns, bipedal beavers, bat-like humanoids, and other fantastic animals inhabit a forest- and ocean-covered Moon. The series was likely intended to boost the paper’s sales and ridicule what contemporary theories? More… Discuss

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Bird on a wire-Perla Batalla_ Special_Features “I’m Your Man”


Leonard Cohen‘s Bird on The Wire:

The most beautiful interpretation of “Like The Bird On The Wire”, ever. Perla flies like a dove above all, off a wire up in the skies, and dive on the winds of the accordion, so divinely played. Perla Batalla is the priestess of freedom and joy of life everlasting in this magnificent scene: Sweet like nectar, and the salt of the Earth. If Leonard is the man, Perla is the woman, the lover, enchanter, charmer, the voice.

Like a bird on the wire
Like a drunk in a midnight choir
I have tried in my way to be free

Like a worm on a hook
Like a knight from some old fashioned book
I have saved all my ribbons for thee

If I, if I have been unkind
I hope that you can just let it go by
If I, if I have been untrue
I hope you know it was never to you

Oh, like a baby, stillborn
Like a beast with his horn
I have torn everyone who reached out for me

But I swear by this song
And by all that I have done wrong
I will make it all up to thee

I saw a beggar leaning on his wooden crutch
He said to me, “You must not ask for so much”
And a pretty woman leaning in her darkened door
She cried to me, “Hey, why not ask for more?”

Oh, like a bird on the wire
Like a drunk in a midnight choir
I have tried in my way to be free

Songwriters
COHEN, LEONARD

Published by
Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

One Giant Keep for Mankind


One Giant Keep for Mankind

When Neil Armstrong returned from his famous moon walk in 1969, he brought back some souvenirs of the trip—and apparently kept them in a closet in his home until his death in 2012. That’s where his wife discovered the camera that recorded the landing and two waist tethers, objects that Armstrong called “just a bunch of trash” in the Apollo 11 mission transcripts. This “trash,” which was supposed to stay in space, is now on display at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. More… Discuss

magical realism: LIKE WATER FOR CHOCOLATE, BY (AFTER) Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel



Like Water For Chocolate

Published on Mar 5, 2012/84,343 viws

This adaptation of the novel by Laura Esquivel was sanctioned by the writer herself; she was going to come over for the premiere in Edinburgh 2003 but then had to back out due to work commitments. Starring Kate Ward, who went on to train at ‘The Central School of Speech and Drama’ this show was our first ‘Sold Out Show’ at the Edinburgh Fringe; in fact we arrived to find out that every single seat had been sold. Happy days!

also read HERE

Like Water for Chocolate

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
For the film based on the novel, see Like Water for Chocolate (film). For the album by Common, see Like Water for Chocolate (album).
Like Water for Chocolate
Like Water for Chocolate (Book Cover).png

U.S book cover
Author Laura Esquivel
Country Mexico
Language Spanish
Genre Romance, Magical realism
Publisher Doubleday, 1992 (Mexico)
Perfection Learning, 1995 (U.S)
Pages 256 (Spanish)
ISBN Spanish: 978-0385721233
English: 978-0780739079

Like Water for Chocolate (Spanish: Como agua para chocolate) is a popular novel published in 1989 by first-time Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel.[1]

The novel follows the story of a young girl named Tita who longs her entire life to marry her lover, Pedro, but can never have him because of her mother’s upholding of the family tradition of the youngest daughter not marrying but taking care of her mother until the day she dies. Tita is only able to express herself when she cooks.

Esquivel employs magical realism to combine the supernatural with the ordinary.[2]

Plot

The book is divided into 12 sections named after the months of the year, starting with January. Each section begins with a Mexican recipe. The chapters outline the preparation of the dish and ties it to an event in the protagonist’s life.[3]

Tita de la Garza, the novel’s main protagonist, is 15 at the start of the story. She lives with her mother Mama Elena, and her older sisters Gertrudis and Rosaura, on a ranch near the Mexico – US border.

Pedro is a neighbor and another main protagonist with whom Tita falls in love at first sight. He asks Mama Elena for Tita’s hand in marriage, but Mama Elena forbids it, citing the De la Garza family tradition that the youngest daughter (in this case Tita) must remain unmarried and take care of her mother until her mother’s death. She suggests that Pedro marries Tita’s sister, Rosaura, instead of Tita. In order to stay close to Tita, Pedro decides to follow Mama Elena’s advice.

Tita has a love of the kitchen and a deep connection with food, a skill enhanced by the fact that Nacha, the family cook, was her primary caretaker as Tita grew up. Her love for cooking also comes from the fact that she was born in the kitchen.

Pedro and Rosaura have a son, Roberto. Rosaura is unable to nurse Roberto, so Tita brings Roberto to her breast to stop the baby from crying. Tita begins to produce breast milk and is able to nurse the baby. This draws her and Pedro closer than ever. They begin meeting secretly, snatching their few times together by sneaking around the ranch and behind the backs of Mama Elena and Rosaura.

Tita’s strong emotions become infused into her cooking, and she unintentionally begins to affect the people around her through the food she prepares. After one particularly rich meal of quail in rose petal sauce flavored with Tita’s erotic thoughts of Pedro, Gertrudis becomes inflamed with lust and leaves the ranch in order to make ravenous love with a revolutionary soldier on the back of a horse, later ending up in a brothel and subsequently disowned by her mother.

Rosaura and Pedro are forced to leave for San Antonio, Texas, at the urging of Mama Elena, who suspects a relationship between Tita and Pedro. Rosaura loses her son Roberto and later becomes infertile from complications during the birth of her daughter Esperanza.

Upon learning the news of her nephew’s death, whom she cared for herself, Tita blames her mother. Mama Elena responds by smacking Tita across the face with a wooden spoon. Tita, destroyed by the death of her beloved nephew and unwilling to cope with her mother’s controlling ways, secludes herself in the dovecote until the sympathetic Dr. John Brown soothes and comforts her. Mama Elena states there is no place for “lunatics” like Tita on the farm, and wants her to be institutionalized. However, the doctor decides to take care of Tita at his home instead. Tita develops a close relationship with Dr. Brown, even planning to marry him at one point, but her underlying feelings for Pedro do not waver.

While John is away, Tita loses her virginity to Pedro. A month later, Tita is worried she may be pregnant with Pedro’s child. Her mother’s ghost taunts her, telling her that she and her child are cursed. Gertrudis visits the ranch for a special holiday and makes Pedro overhear about Tita’s pregnancy, causing Tita and Pedro to argue about running away together. This causes Pedro to get drunk and sing below Tita’s window while she is arguing with Mama Elena’s ghost. Just as she confirms she isn’t pregnant and frees herself of her mother’s grasp once and for all, Mama Elena’s ghost gets revenge on Tita by setting Pedro on fire, leaving him bedridden for a while and behaving like “a child throwing a tantrum”.[4] Meanwhile, Tita is preparing for John’s return, and is hesitant to tell him that she cannot marry him because she is no longer a virgin. Rosaura comes to the kitchen while Tita is cooking and argues with her over Tita’s involvement with Rosaura’s daughter Esperenza’s life and the tradition of the youngest daughter remaining at home to care for the mother until she dies, a tradition which Tita despises. She vows not to let it ruin her niece’s life as it did hers. John and his deaf great-aunt come over and Tita tells him that she cannot marry him. John seems to accept it, “reaching for Tita’s hand…with a smile on his face”.[5]

Many years later, Tita is preparing for Esperanza’s and John’s son Alex’s wedding to one another, now that Rosaura has died from digestive problems. During the wedding, Pedro proposes to Tita saying that he does not want to “die without making [Tita] [his] wife”.[6] Tita accepts and Pedro dies having sex with her in the kitchen storage room right after the wedding. Tita is overcome with sorrow and cold, and begins to eat matches.[7] The candles are sparked by the heat of his memory, creating a spectacular fire that engulfs them both, eventually consuming the entire ranch.

The narrator of the story is the daughter of Esperanza, nicknamed “Tita”, after her great-aunt. She describes how after the fire, the only thing that survived under the smoldering rubble of the ranch was Tita’s cookbook, which contained all the recipes described in the preceding chapters.

Characters

  • Josefita (Tita) de la Garza – main character; a talented cook and Pedro’s lover
  • Pedro Muzquiz – Tita’s lover, marries Rosaura to be closer to Tita.
  • Elena de la Garza (Mama Elena) – Tita’s mother who Tita thinks is cruel and controlling.
  • Gertrudis De La Garza – Tita’s older sister, Mama Elena’s illegitimate daughter. She runs away with Juan.
  • Rosaura De La Garza – Tita’s oldest sister who marries Pedro; had a son(Roberto)who died. She later had a daughter (Esperenza)
  • Dr. John Brown – the family doctor who falls in love with Tita and has a son from a previous marriage.
  • Nacha – the family cook. She was like a mother to Tita.
  • Chencha – ranch maid for Mama Elena and her family; Married to Jesus
  • Roberto Muzquiz – son of Pedro and Rosaura. He dies young.
  • Esperanza Muzquiz – daughter of Pedro and Rosaura, she marries Alex Brown. She is also the mother of the narrator.
  • Alex Brown – son of John Brown, marries Esperanza.
  • Nicolas – the manager of the ranch.
  • Juan Alejandrez – the captain in the military who took Gertrudis and eventually marries her.
  • Jesus Martinez – Chencha’s first love and husband.

Self growth

At the beginning of the novel, Tita was a generally submissive young lady. As the novel progresses, Tita learns to disobey the injustice of her mother, and gradually becomes more and more adept at expressing her inner fire through various means. At first, cooking was her only outlet, but through self-discovery she learned to verbalize and actualize her feelings, and stand up to her despotic mother.

Cruelty and violence

Mama Elena often resorts to cruelty and violence as she forces Tita to obey her. Many of the responsibilities she imposes on Tita, especially those relating to Pedro and Rosaura’s wedding, are blatant acts of cruelty, given Tita’s pain over losing Pedro. Mama Elena meets Tita’s slightest protest with angry tirades and beatings. If she even suspects that Tita has not fulfilled her duties, as when she thought that Tita intentionally ruined the wedding cake, she beats her. When Tita dares to stand up to her mother and to blame her for Roberto’s death, Mama Elena smacks her across the face with a wooden spoon and breaks her nose. This everyday cruelty does not seem so unusual, however, in a land where a widow must protect herself and her family from bandits and revolutionaries. However, many readers feel that her setting Pedro on fire and almost killing him is much more severe than her previous actions.

Tradition

The romantic love that is so exalted throughout the novel is forbidden by Tita’s mother in order to blindly enforce the tradition that the youngest daughter be her mother’s chaste guardian. However, the traditional etiquette enforced by Mama Elena is defied progressively throughout the novel. This parallels the setting of the Mexican Revolution growing in intensity. The novel further parallels the Mexican Revolution because during the Mexican Revolution the power of the country was in the hands of a select few and the people had no power to express their opinions. Likewise, in Like Water for Chocolate, Mama Elena represents the select few who had the power in their hands, while Tita represents the people because she had no power to express her opinions but had to obey her mother’s rules.

Food

Food is also one of the major themes in the story which is seen throughout the story. It is used very creatively to represent the characters feelings and situations.

Outer Space Treaty Signed (1967)


Outer Space Treaty Signed (1967)

The Outer Space Treaty represents the basic legal framework of international space law. It bans the stationing of weapons of mass destruction in outer space, exclusively limits the use of the Moon and other celestial bodies to peaceful purposes, holds countries responsible for any damage caused by the objects they launch, and forbids any government from claiming a celestial body, such as the Moon or a planet. The Moon Treaty was approved 12 years later but was considered a failure. Why? More… Discuss

Is it OK to leave objects on the Moon?


 

Is it OK to leave objects on the Moon?
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-magazine-monitor-30130941

 

Prostia_omeneasca_Povestea Drobului de Sare, de Ion Creanga


Prostia_omeneasca_Povestea Drobului de Sare_ Ion Creanga (click to access here)

Prostia_omeneasca_Povestea Drobului de Sare_ Ion Creanga (click to access here)

word: apogee


apogee 

Definition: (noun) The farthest or highest point; the apex.
Synonyms: summit, height, peak, climax, pinnacle, zenith, acme
Usage: It took many years for the industry to reach its apogee, but only a few more for it to become defunct. Discuss.

The Wine and the Cup -Rumi


The Wine and the Cup -Rumi

The wine of divine grace is limitless:
All limits come only from the faults of the cup.
Moonlight floods the whole sky from horizon to horizon;
How much it can fill your room depends on its windows.
Grant a great dignity, my friend, to the cup of your life;
Love has designed it to hold His eternal wine.

Quotations 101: Henry Miller (tropic of capricorn, tropic of cancer)


“To walk in money through the night crowd, protected by money, lulled by money, dulled by money, the crowd itself a money, the breath money, no least single object anywhere that is not money, money, money everywhere and still not enough, and then no money or a little money or less money or more money, but money, always money, and if you have money or you don’t have money it is the money that counts and money makes money, but what makes money make money?”

“No man is great enough or wise enough for any of us to surrender our destiny to. The only way in which anyone can lead us is to restore to us the belief in our own guidance.”

“Take a good look at me. Now tell me, do you think I’m the sort of fellow who gives a fuck what happens once he’s dead? “

Read more about Henry Miller, here

Song to the Moon – Antonín Dvořák: make music part of your life series


Song to the Moon – Antonín Dvořák

See lyrics translated into English below.

Soprano Renee Fleming sings this aria. Dvorak’s composition relies upon expansive arpeggiated chords to capture the fairy tale ambiance of Rusalka. The amicable old Spirit of the Lake, Jezibab, is enjoying the singing of the Wood Nymphs, when his daughter, Rusalka, sadly approaches him. She admits that she has fallen in love with a handsome prince. Yearning to know the bliss of union with him, she wishes to become human. Deeply saddened, the Spirit of the Lake consents to her request, and leaves. All alone, Rusalka sings this magnificent aria and shares the secrets of her longing to the moon.

Featuring the paintings and artwork of William Bouguereau, Paul Cezanne, Claude Monet, J.W. Waterhouse, Armand Guillaumin, and Spadecaller.

Lyrics (translation)

Silver moon upon the deep dark sky,
Through the vast night pierce your rays.
This sleeping world you wander by,
Smiling on man’s homes and ways.
Oh moon ere past you glide, tell me,
Tell me, oh where does my loved one bide?
Oh moon ere past you glide, tell me
Tell me, oh where does my loved one bide?
Tell him, oh tell him, my silver moon,
Mine are the arms that shall hold him,
That between waking and sleeping he may
Think of the love that enfolds him,
May between waking and sleeping
Think of the love that enfolds him.
Light his path far away, light his path,
Tell him, oh tell him who does for him stay!
Human soul, should it dream of me, Let my memory wakened be.
Moon, moon, oh do not wane, do not wane,
Moon, oh moon, do not wane….

Encumbered not, poetic thought by George-B (The smudge and other poems


Encumbered not, poetic thought by George-B  (The smudge and other poems)

Unnoticed, silence breathed its way in:

can you watch now the growing grass,
the snowflakes parachutes landing and,
dust settling on top of dusty old, furniture tops?

almost instantaneously
night had moved over everything:

can you see now the shadows,
and the listless moon in owe,
eyeing the blue, as if…its dust,
were not to remain undisturbed
eons ahead,
except for a few boot prints…
cold of course, and odorless, and sterile…
encumbered not…

Photo: Earth and moon seen from space shuttle

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: Luna 5 Crashes on the Moon (1965)


Luna 5 Crashes on the Moon (1965)

Luna 5 was an unmanned Soviet space probe launched for lunar investigation. On May 10, the spacecraft began spinning around its axis due to a problem in a gyroscope in the guidance system unit. A subsequent attempt to fire the main engine failed because of a ground control error, and Luna 5 impacted the lunar surface. Though it failed to soft-land—Luna 9 would do so a year later—Luna 5 was the second Soviet lunar probe to land on the moon. What was the first? More… Discuss

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Song to the Moon – Antonín Dvořák



See lyrics translated into English below.

Soprano Renee Fleming sings this aria. Dvorak’s composition relies upon expansive arpeggiated chords to capture the fairy tale ambiance of Rusalka. The amicable old Spirit of the Lake, Jezibab, is enjoying the singing of the Wood Nymphs, when his daughter, Rusalka, sadly approaches him. She admits that she has fallen in love with a handsome prince. Yearning to know the bliss of union with him, she wishes to become human. Deeply saddened, the Spirit of the Lake consents to her request, and leaves. All alone, Rusalka sings this magnificent aria and shares the secrets of her longing to the moon.

Featuring the paintings and artwork of William Bouguereau, Paul Cezanne, Claude Monet, J.W. Waterhouse, Armand Guillaumin, and Spadecaller.

Lyrics (translation)

Silver moon upon the deep dark sky,
Through the vast night pierce your rays.
This sleeping world you wander by,
Smiling on man’s homes and ways.
Oh moon ere past you glide, tell me,
Tell me, oh where does my loved one bide?
Oh moon ere past you glide, tell me
Tell me, oh where does my loved one bide?
Tell him, oh tell him, my silver moon,
Mine are the arms that shall hold him,
That between waking and sleeping he may
Think of the love that enfolds him,
May between waking and sleeping
Think of the love that enfolds him.
Light his path far away, light his path,
Tell him, oh tell him who does for him stay!
Human soul, should it dream of me, Let my memory wakened be.
Moon, moon, oh do not wane, do not wane,
Moon, oh moon, do not wane….

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: FIRST MAN-MADE OBJECT REACHES THE MOON (1959)


First Man-Made Object Reaches the Moon (1959)

In the early years of space exploration, the US and USSR launched numerous probes in their race to explore outer space and the Moon in particular. The first probes were intended either to pass very close to the Moon—performing a flyby—or crash directly into it—a maneuver known as a hard landing. The Soviets were the first to succeed in the latter objective. Luna 2 impacted the lunar surface on September 14, 1959. What did Premier Nikita Khrushchev present to the US president the next day? More… Discuss

 

THE MOON RABBIT


The Moon Rabbit

While the Man in the Moon is a popular European myth, many other cultures tell the tale of the Moon Rabbit, whose contours they trace on the orb’s surface. In East Asian folklore, the Moon Rabbit mixes the elixir of immortality. In Aztec legends, the god Quetzalcoatl elevated a rabbit to the Moon as a show of gratitude after the rabbit offered himself up as food. Native Americans tell of a rabbit riding the Moon. Who famously agreed in 1969 to look out for the Chinesebunny girl” on the Moon? More… Discuss

 

The Moon by Day: I’ll be watching you!


The Moon @ Newport Beach

The Moon by day:   Newport Beach

Fair Weather, By George


Fair Weather, (By George)

 

My dad was the first meteorologist who could do more than just predict the weather. He enjoyed fishing, hobby that he shared with me mostly on summer vacations.

This story is about fair weather, the way he was able to intervene in the complicated business of making an unforgettable sunny day.

 “Dad, do you think it’s going to rain tomorrow, like it did yesterday?” I asked him, concerned about the eventuality of not being able to fulfill our well planned outing. “No, he said”, as if totally sure of the truthfulness of his statement.

“How can you be so sure?”, I asked, since I did not have any knowledge of the science of weather prediction.  “Because I took care of it”, he answered without any hesitation. “You know that hole in the attic’s wall?” he went on saying, “The one facing east?” “Yeah”, I said? “Well, you see, about an hour ago, when you were still asleep, I went up there, in the attic, with one of those  long poles grandma was using to grow the beans  on, and a handful of hay. I wrapped the hay around the tip of the pole, and reach out to the hole in the sky thru which the clouds enter. I waited then for a few minutes, while all the clouds left the sky thru the hole to the West, and quickly I plugged that one too with some hay. So tomorrow, you see, will be sunny, no clouds in the sky what so ever. Will pack our rain coats just as a precaution, but will not have an opportunity to wear them, I promise you.”

I was five years old.  I heard many stories throughout the years about ways to predict the weather, from the circles around the Sun, and the Moon, and the height at which swallows fly  or the way the Sun wink back at us with his last red glowing ray, before it goes to sleep beyond the horizon, the stillness of air, and many more. But this practical way to create a special father-son fishing expedition will always stay with me, treasured and cherished as wisdom of age, wisdom of ages.

Today In History: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Established (1958)


National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Established (1958)

NASA is an agency of the US government charged with aeronautics research and the nation’s civilian space program. During its history, it has been responsible for manned trips to the Moon, orbiting observatories, and unmanned programs that explored other planets and interplanetary space. Today, its goals include improving human understanding of the universe and establishing a permanent human presence in space. NASA was created by an act of Congress passed largely in response to what 1957 event? More… Discuss

This Day In History: Neil Armstrong Becomes the First Man to Walk on the Moon (1969)


Neil Armstrong Becomes the First Man to Walk on the Moon (1969)

As commander of Apollo 11, Armstrong was the first person to set foot on the Moon. With hundreds of millions watching a broadcast of his history-making moonwalk, he uttered the now famous line, “That’s one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind.” Buzz Aldrin followed, and the two astronauts proceeded to set up scientific equipment, conduct experiments, and collect samples from the lunar surface. What other spacecraft landed on the moon while Apollo 11 was still there? More… Discuss