Tag Archives: movement

Henryk Górecki – Symphony Nº3 (Symphony of Sorrowful Songs). Second Movement, make music part of your life series


Henryk Górecki – Symphony Nº3 (Symphony of Sorrowful Songs). Second Movement.

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Best Classical Music Series: Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 21, K.467 / Yeol Eum Son,


Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 21, K.467 / Yeol Eum Son

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov – Capriccio Espagnol, Op. 34


Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov – Capriccio Espagnol, Op. 34

Happy birthday Bach: Mozart Quartet No 19 K 465 Dissonanze Dissonances Hagen Quartet



Mozart Quartet No 19 K 465 Dissonanze Dissonances Hagen Quartet

The String Quartet No. 19 in C Major, KV. 465 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, nicknamed “Dissonance” on account of its unusual slow introduction, is perhaps the most famous of his quartets. It is the last in the set of six quartets composed between 1782-1785 that he dedicated to Joseph Haydn.
According to the catalog of works Mozart began early the preceding year, the quartet was completed on January 14, 1785. As is normal with Mozart’s later quartets, it is in four movements:
1. Adagio-Allegro
2. Andante cantabile – in F major
3. Menuetto. Allegro. (C major, trio in C minor)
4. Allegro molto
The first movement opens with ominous quiet Cs in the cello, joined successively by the viola (on A♭ moving to a G), the second violin (on E♭) and the first violin (on A), thus creating the “dissonance” itself and narrowly avoiding a greater one. This lack of harmony and fixed key continues throughout the slow introduction before resolving into the bright C major of the Allegro section of the first movement, which is in sonata form. Mozart goes on to use chromatic and whole tone scales to outline fourths. Arch shaped lines emphasizing fourths in the first violin (C – F – C) and the violoncello (G – C – C’ – G’) are combined with lines emphasizing fifths in the second violin and viola. Over the barline between the second and third measures of the example a fourth-suspension can be seen in the second violin’s tied C. In another of his string quartets, KV 464, such fourth-suspensions are also very prominent.
The second movement is in sonatina form, i.e. lacking the development section. Alfred Einstein writes of the coda of this movement that “the first violin openly expresses what seemed hidden beneath the conversational play of the subordinate theme.” The third movement is a minuet and trio, with the exuberant mood of the minuet darkening into the C minor of the trio. The last movement is also in sonata form.
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Schubert Symphony No 8 B minor Unfinished Unvollendete Claudio Abbado ,great compositions/performances


Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy Piano Trio No 1 D Minor Op. 49: make music part of your life series


Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy Piano Trio No 1 D Minor Op. 49

Mozart: Piano concerto n. No. 21 in C major, K.467 Pollini-Muti: great compositions/performances


Mozart: Piano concerto n. No. 21 in C major, K.467 Pollini-Muti

Beethoven | Piano Sonata No. 12 in A-flat major, Op. 26 | Daniel Barenboim: great compositions/performances


Beethoven | Piano Sonata No. 12 in A-flat major, Op. 26 | Daniel Barenboim

Español: Sonata para Piano nº12 en La bemol Mayor, Op. 26

* 1st Movement (Andante con Variazioni)
* 2nd Movement (Scherzo, Allegro Molto)
* 3rd Movement (Marcia funebre sulla morte d’un Eroe)
* 4th Movement (Allegro)

Work: Piano Sonata No. 12 in A-flat major, Op. 26
Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven
Soloist: Daniel Barenhoim

Liszt – Piano Concerto No. 1 in Eb, S.124 (Richter): great compositions/performances


Franz Liszt: Piano Concerto #1 in Eb S.124(Richter)

Great Compositions/Performances: Rimsky Korsakov Capriccio Espagnol Op 34 Berliner Phil Dir Zubin Mehta


[youtube.com/watch?v=Lh6mDL-VwYw]

Rimsky Korsakov Capriccio Espagnol Op 34 Berliner Phil Dir Zubin Mehta

 

Capriccio espagnol, Op. 34, is the common Western title for an orchestral work based on Spanish folk melodies and written by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov in 1887. Rimsky-Korsakov originally intended to write the work for a solo violin with orchestra, but later decided that a purely orchestral work would do better justice to the lively melodies. The Russian title is Каприччио на испанские темы (literally, Capriccio on Spanish Themes). The Capriccio consists of five movements and is scored for 2 flutes, piccolo, 2 oboes (one doubling English horn), 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, percussion, harp and strings.[

Structure

The work has five movements, divided into two parts comprising the first three and the latter two movements respectively..

  1. The first movement, Alborada, is a festive and exciting dance, typically from traditional asturian music to celebrate the rising of the sun. It features the clarinet with two solos, and later features a solo violin with a solo similar to the clarinet’s.
  2. The second movement, Variazioni, begins with a melody in the horn section. Variations of this melody are then repeated by other instruments and sections of the orchestra.
  3. The third movement, Alborada, presents the same asturian dance as the first movement. The two movements are nearly identical, in fact, except that this movement has a different instrumentation and key.
  4. The fourth movement, Scena e canto gitano (“Scene and gypsy song”) opens with five cadenzas — first by the horns and trumpets, then solo violin, flute, clarinet, and harp — played over rolls on various percussion instruments. It is then followed by a dance in triple time leading attacca into the final movement.
  5. The fifth and final movement, Fandango asturiano, is also an energetic dance from the Asturias region of northern Spain. The piece ends with an even more rousing statement of the Alborada theme.

A complete performance of the Capriccio takes around 16 minutes

Use in film

  • Capriccio Espagnol, Op.34 is played during the opening credits and as the Spanish Carnaval background music during Josef von Sternberg‘s film The Devil Is a Woman (1935), credited on screen as ‘Music based on Rimsky-Korsakoff’s “Spanish Caprice” and Old Spanish Melodies’.
  • Excerpts were heard in the fictional 1947 biopic of Rimsky-Korsakov, Song of Scheherazade.
  • A recording by “Philharmonia Slavonica” featured in the film Brokeback Mountain (2006). The “Philharmonia Slavonica” is pseudonymous group that appears on a number of recordings of the bargain-record producer Alfred Scholz. The performances attributed to them are often by the Austrian Radio (ORF) Orchestra.
  • A recording by the Moscow Radio Symphony in the film Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown (1988)

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 22, K. 305


[youtube.com/watch?v=XEkIwkg_HoY]
Violin Sonata No. 22 in A major, K. 305 (293d) is a work composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in Mannheim 1778. There are two movements:
0:00 1. Allegro di molto
4:53 2. Tema. Andante grazioso – Variations I-V – Variation VI. Allegro
The first movement is in sonata form. This movement has one of the bounciest happiest melodies to be found in his violin sonatas. The second movement is in a theme and variations form. This movement is more somber than the opening movement, being at a slower tempo and having a more subdued melody.

 

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GREAT COMPOSERS/COMPOSITIONS: Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 23 in A, K. 488


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Photo credit: photoAtlas)

The Piano Concerto No. 23 in A major (K. 488) is a musical composition for piano and orchestra written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. It was finished, according to Mozart’s own catalogue, on March 2, 1786, around the time of the premiere of his opera, The Marriage of Figaro. It was one of three subscription concerts given that spring and was probably played by Mozart himself at one of these. The concerto is scored for piano solo and an orchestra consisting of one flute, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns and strings. In Mozart’s later works the wind instruments are equal to the stringed instruments, and this is also the case in this concerto. It has three movements:
1. Allegro in A major and common time.
2. Adagio in F-sharp minor and 6/8 time (in later editions, the tempo is listed as Andante).
3. Allegro assai in A and alla breve (in later editions, the tempo is listed as Presto). In Rondo form.
The first movement is mostly sunny and positive with the occasional melancholic touches typical of Mozart pieces in A major and is in sonata form. The piece begins with a double exposition, the first played by the orchestra, and the second when the piano joins in. The first exposition is static from a tonal point of view and is quite concise, the third theme is not yet revealed. The second exposition includes the soloist and is modulatory. It is also includes the third previously unheard third theme. The second exposition is ornamented as opposed to the first exposition which is not. The second theme has harmonic tension. This is expressed by dissonances that are played on the beat, and then solved by an interval of a second going downwards. This is also expressed in the use of chromatics in the melody and bass lines which is a cause for harmonic tension, as the listeners anticipate the arrival of the tonic.
The second, slow movement, in ternary form, is melancholic and somewhat operatic in tone. The piano begins alone with a theme characterized by unusually wide leaps. This is the only movement by Mozart in F sharp minor. The dynamics are soft throughout most of the piece. The middle of the movement contains a brighter section in A major announced by flute and clarinet that Mozart would later use to introduce the trio “Ah! taci ingiusto core!” in his opera Don Giovanni. The third movement is a vigorous and cheerful rondo, shaded by moves into other keys as is the opening movement (to C major from E minor and back during the secondary theme in this case, for instance) and with a central section whose opening in F sharp minor is interrupted by a clarinet tune in D major, an intrusion that reminds us, notes Girdlestone, that instrumental music at the time was informed by opera buffa and its sudden changes of point of view as well as of scene. 

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Mozart – Quintet for Piano and Winds in E flat, K. 452



The Quintet in E flat major for Piano and Winds, K. 452, was completed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on March 30, 1784 and premiered two days later at the Imperial and Royal National Court Theater in Vienna. Shortly after the premiere, Mozart wrote to his father that “I myself consider it to be the best thing I have written in my life.” It is scored for piano, oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon. There are three movements:
1. Largo – Allegro moderato
2. Larghetto
3. Allegretto
This structure closely resembles that of a typical sonata. The first movement is a sprightly sonata form Allegro, with themes being passed from instrument to instrument, usually with the piano introducing a theme and accompanying while the oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon play variations on it. The Larghetto movement is typical of the 2nd movement of other Mozart pieces: soft and gentle, yet still engaging. The Allegretto movement is a “sonata-rondo” of the kind Mozart used as the finale of many of the piano concertos he was writing at this period, and contains a written-out cadenza-like section toward the end.
This piece was the inspiration for the Quintet in E flat for Piano and Winds, Op. 16, by Ludwig van Beethoven, who composed this tribute in 1796. Both compositions use the same scoring. 
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Mozart – Symphony No. 40 in G minor, K. 550



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote his Symphony No. 40 in G minor, KV. 550, in 1788. It is sometimes referred to as the “Great G minor symphony,” to distinguish it from the “Little G minor symphony,” No. 25. The two are the only minor key symphonies Mozart wrote. The 40th Symphony was completed on 25 July 1788. The composition occupied an exceptionally productive period of just a few weeks in 1788, during which time he also completed the 39th and 41st symphonies (26 June and 10 August, respectively). The symphony is scored (in its revised version) for flute, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, and strings. Notably missing are trumpets and timpani.
The work is in four movements, in the usual arrangement (fast movement, slow movement, minuet, fast movement) for a classical-style symphony:
1. Molto allegro, 2/2
2. Andante, 6/8
3. Menuetto. Allegretto — Trio, 3/4
4. Finale. Allegro assai, 2/2.
Every movement but the third is in sonata form; the minuet and trio are in the usual ternary form. This work has elicited varying interpretations from critics. Robert Schumann regarded it as possessing “Grecian lightness and grace”. Donald Francis Tovey saw in it the character of opera buffa. Almost certainly, however, the most common perception today is that the symphony is tragic in tone and intensely emotional; for example, Charles Rosen (in The Classical Style) has called the symphony “a work of passion, violence, and grief.”
Although interpretations differ, the symphony is unquestionably one of Mozart’s most greatly admired works, and it is frequently performed and recorded. Ludwig van Beethoven knew the symphony well, copying out 29 measures from the score in one of his sketchbooks. It is thought that the opening theme of the last movement may have inspired Beethoven in composing the third movement of his Fifth Symphony
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at:http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/