Tag Archives: Mozart

Mozart – Piano Sonata No. 1 in C, K. 279: make music part of your life series


Mozart – Piano Sonata No. 1 in C, K. 279

Mozart – The Marriage of Figaro Overture (K.492) – Wiener Symphoniker – Fabio Luisi : make music part of your life series


Mozart – The Marriage of Figaro Overture (K.492) – Wiener Symphoniker – Fabio Luisi (HD)

Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 27 in G, K. 379: make music part of your life series


Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 27 in G, K. 379

Mozart Quartet No 16 K 428 Hagen Quartet: great compositions/performances


Mozart Quartet No 16 K 428 Hagen Quartet

Mozart: “Ruhe sanft, mein holdes Leben” from Zaide K344: make music part of your life series


Mozart: “Ruhe sanft, mein holdes Leben” from Zaide K344

Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 35 in A major, K. 526: make music part of your life series



From:

MozartViolin Sonata No. 35 in A major, K. 526

I. Molto allegro [0:00]
II. Andante [9:30]
III. Presto [19:50]

Sigiswald Kuijken, violin
Luc Devos, fortepiano

performed on period instruments

Painting of Mozart by Barbara Krafft

Andante For Flute in C Major Mozart, James Galway At Lincoln Center 1980: great compositions/performances


Andante For Flute in C Major Mozart

Mozart: Trio for Clarinet, Viola and Piano, K.498 – Portal, Pasquier, Pennetier: great compositions/performances



From   glemoine14  glemoine14

Mozart: Trio for Clarinet, Viola and Piano, K.498 – Portal, Pasquier, Pennetier

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791):Trio for Clarinet, Viola and Piano in E-flat major, “Kegelstatt”, K. 498 (1786)
Trio pour clarinette, alto et piano en Mi bémol majeur
I      Andante;
II    Menuetto;
III  Rondo: Allegretto

Portal: clarinet / clarinette
Pasquier: viola / alto
Pennetier: piano

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Divertimento in F major KV 138: make music part of your life series


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Divertimento in F major KV 138

Number: KV 138 Composer: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Date: March 1772 Place: Salzburg, Austria Extra: Also called as ‘The Salzburg Symphony No. 3’:
I. Allegro
II. Andante
III. Presto

 

Mozart – Requiem By Herbert von Karajan (Full HD) (Full Concert): great compositions/performances


Mozart – Requiem By Herbert von Karajan (Full HD) (Full Concert)

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Herbert von Karajan Full HD 1080p Full Concert Soundtrack Complete Requiem greatest concert memorable The Requiem Mass in D minor (K. 626) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was composed in Vienna in 1791 and left unfinished at the composer’s death on December 5. A completion by Franz Xaver Süssmayr was delivered to Count Franz von Walsegg, who had anonymously commissioned the piece for a requiem Mass to commemorate the February 14 anniversary of his wife’s death.
It is one of the most enigmatic pieces of music ever composed, mostly because of the myths and controversies surrounding it, especially around how much of the piece was completed by Mozart before his death. The autograph manuscript shows the finished and orchestrated introit in Mozart’s hand, as well as detailed drafts of the Kyrie and the sequence Dies Irae as far as the first nine bars of “Lacrimosa”, and the offertory. It cannot be shown to what extent Süssmayr may have depended on now lost “scraps of paper” for the remainder; he later claimed the Sanctus and Agnus Dei as his own. Walsegg probably intended to pass the Requiem off as his own composition, as he is known to have done with other works. This plan was frustrated by a public benefit performance for Mozart’s widow Constanze. A modern contribution to the mythology is Peter Shaffer‘s 1979 play Amadeus, in which the mysterious messenger with the commission is the masked Antonio Salieri who intends to claim authorship for himself.
The Requiem is scored for 2 basset horns in F, 2 bassoons, 2 trumpets in D, 3 trombones (alto, tenor & bass), timpani (2 drums), violins, viola and basso continuo (cello, double bass, and organ). The vocal forces include soprano, contralto, tenor, and bass soloists and a SATB mixed choir.

Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 27 in B flat, K. 595 (make music part of your life series)


Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 27 in B flat, K. 595

The Piano Concerto No. 27 in B flat major, K. 595, is a concertante work by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, for piano and orchestra. It is the last piano concerto he wrote. The manuscript is dated 5 January 1791. However, Alan Tyson’s analysis of the paper on which Mozart composed the work indicated that Mozart used this paper between December 1787 and February 1789, which implies composition well before 1791. Simon Keefe has written that the composition of the work dates from 1788. By contrast, Wolfgang Rehm has stated that Mozart composed this concerto in late 1790 and early 1791. Cliff Eisen has discussed the controversy over the time of composition in his review of the published facsimile of the score. The work followed by some years the series of highly successful concertos Mozart wrote for his own concerts, and by the time of its premiere Mozart was no longer so prominent a performer on the public stage. The concerto may have been first performed at a concert on 4 March 1791 in Jahn’s Hall by Mozart and by a clarinetist Joseph Bähr. If so, this was Mozart’s last appearance in a public concert, as he took ill in September 1791 and died on 5 December 1791. Another possibility is that it was premiered by Mozart’s pupil Barbara Ployer on the occasion of a public concert at the Auersperg palace in January 1791. The work is scored for flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, solo piano and strings, which makes it thinner than Mozart’s other late concertos, all of which except for No. 23 have trumpet and timpani.
It has the following three movements:

1. Allegro
2. Larghetto in E-flat major
3. Allegro
Although all three movements are in a major key, minor keys are suggested, as is evident from the second theme of the first movement (in the dominant minor), as well as the presence of a remote minor key in the early development of that movement and of the tonic minor in the middle of the Larghetto.
Another interesting characteristic of the work is its rather strong thematic integration of the movements, which would become ever more important in the nineteenth century. The principal theme of the Larghetto, for instance, is revived as the second theme of the final movement (in the 65th measure). The principal theme for finale was also used in Mozart’s song “Sehnsucht nach dem Frühling” (also called “Komm, lieber Mai”) , K. 596, which immediately follows this concerto in the Köchel catalogue.
Mozart wrote down his cadenzas for the first and third movements.
Simon Keefe has discussed the concerto in detail, with emphasis on the distinctive character and experiments in style of the concerto compared to Mozart’s other concerti in this genre.
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at: http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/
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NOTE: I do not know who the performers of this are, nor the place and date of recording!!! Any suggestions are welcome.
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ENJOY!!!! 😀

Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1 (make music part of your life series)


[youtube.com/watch?v=Rt9j8sypi00]

Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1, in G major, op. 40 

Igor Ozim, violin
Vienna Opera Orchestra
Moshe Atzmon

Beethoven’s reputation as a pianist often obscures the fact that he was a very capable violinist. Although not an accomplished master, he possessed a profound love for and understanding of the instrument, evident in his ten violin sonatas, the violin concerto, and numerous quintets, quartets, and other chamber works. The two Romances for violin stand out because they are single-movement works in concerto settings. The Romance in G major was published in 1803 by Hoffmeister & Kühnel in Leipzig; the date of its first performance is not known. Despite the lower opus number, it was composed at least five years after the Romance in F, Op. 50, which was published in 1805. He retained the early Classical orchestra he employed for his earlier Piano Concerto in B flat, Op. 19: one flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, and strings. Often described as a “preparation” for the Violin Concerto, Op. 61, of 1806, the Romance in G stands as a fine work in its own right, clearly demonstrating Beethoven’s mastery of the high-Classical style of Mozart and Haydn. Furthermore, Beethoven creates subtle connections between disparate sections of a work.

Cast in a two-episode rondo format (ABACA coda), the Romance in G is not imbued with sonata-form characteristics, as are many of Beethoven’s later rondo movements. The rondo theme (A) is in two parts, each performed first by the soloist then repeated by the orchestra. Descending sixteenth notes in the solo part mark the beginning of B, in which the orchestra is relegated to a purely accompanimental role, creating unity by including figures from the rondo. Section B spends a significant amount of time on the dominant (D major); however, this does not represent a modulation but a preparation for the return of the rondo in G major. Again, the soloist performs both segments of the A section alone, this time including a running eighth note accompaniment under each of the literally repeated themes. Beethoven set the second episode, C, in E minor. The minor mode, dotted rhythms, and staccato passages give the section a “gypsy” music tinge. The foray into a new key area ends with the return of the G major rondo theme, again played by the soloist, but with accompaniment by the orchestra. Beethoven forgoes the repetition of each of the two parts of the rondo and ends the work with a brief coda featuring a lengthy trill in the solo violin. The three fortissimo chords that close the piece seem oddly, possibly comically, out of place in this generally quiet work, but they do resemble the orchestral string parts at the end of each rondo section. [allmusic.com]

make music part of your life series: Mozart – Symphony No. 35 in D, K. 385, “Haffner”


[youtube.com/watch?v=p3rI-nFMFZE]

Mozart – Symphony No. 35 in D, K. 385,  “Haffner”

Symphony No. 35 in D major, K. 385, was composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in 1782 and is also called the Haffner Symphony. It was commissioned by the Haffners, a prominent Salzburg family, for the occasion of Sigmund Haffner’s ennoblement. The Haffner Symphony should not be confused with the eight-movement Haffner Serenade, another piece Mozart wrote on commission from the same family in 1776. The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in D and G, 2 trumpets in D, timpani, and strings. Mozart’s choice of key for the Haffner Symphony is an aspect that catches one’s attention. According to Cuyler, “the key of D major, which was so felicitous for the winds, served Mozart more often than any other key, even C, for his symphonies,” including the Paris (No. 31) and Prague (No. 38) symphonies. The key is also indicative of the work’s serenade origins as all of Mozart’s orchestral serenades are scored in D major. Hence, it is not surprising that the Haffner Symphony was written in the key of D major. The symphony is in four movements:
1. Allegro con spirito, 4/4
2. Andante, 2/4
3. Menuetto, 3/4
4. Presto, 2/2.
The Haffner Symphony usually runs somewhere around 20 minutes in length. A recording by George Szell with the Cleveland Orchestra (Sony SBK 46333) runs 19.11; one by Iona Brown with the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields (Haenssler CD 94.003) is 21.09; and one by Sir Neville Marriner also with the same ensemble (Philips 420 486-2) runs 21.34.
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at: http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/

make music part of your life series: Mozart – Missa Brevis in C, K. 259 [complete] (Organ Solo Mass)


[youtube.com/watch?v=Sxl-puuO7QA]

Mozart – Missa Brevis in C, K. 259 [complete] (Organ Solo Mass)

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791).
Composed December 1775/1776 in Salzburg.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Missa Brevis No. 8 in C major, K. 259, is a mass composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, probably in 1776.[1] It is scored for SATB soloists, SATB choir, violin I and II, 2 oboes, 2 clarini (high trumpets), 3 trombones colla parte, timpani and basso continuo.

Although classed as a missa brevis (brief mass), the inclusion of trumpets in the scoring makes it a missa brevis et solemnis.[1][2] The mass derives its nickname Orgelmesse or Orgelsolomesse (Organ Solo Mass) from the obbligato organ solo entry of the Benedictus.[1][3] This is one of three masses Mozart composed in November and December 1776, all set in C major, including the Credo Mass (K. 257) and the Piccolominimesse (K. 258).[4]

The work consists of six movements. Performances require approximately 10–15 minutes.

  1. “Kyrie” Andante, C major, common time
  2. “Gloria” Allegro, C major, 3/4
  3. “Credo” Allegro, C major, common time
  4. Sanctus” Adagio maestoso, C major, 3/4
    “Pleni sunt coeli et terra…” Allegro, C major, cut common time
  5. “Benedictus” Allegro vivace, G major, 3/4
    “Hosanna in excelsis…” Allegro, C major, 3/4
  6. Agnus Dei” Adagio, C major, common time
    Dona nobis pacem…” Allegro, C major, 3/4

FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at: http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki

great compositions/performances: Mozart Concerto D Minor K466 Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa


[youtube.com/watch?v=FBVITUka_30]

Mozart Concerto D Minor K466 Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa

Filmed live May 20, 2012, Freiburg im Breisgau ,Germany
Cadenzas by Mozart’s favorite student – and billiards pal, Jan Nepomuk Hummel 🙂

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Neuer Markt in Vienna with Capuchin Church and Haus zur Mehlgrube on the right, painting by Bernardo Bellotto, 1760

The Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor, K. 466, was written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in 1785. The first performance took place at the Mehlgrube Casino in Vienna on February 11, 1785, with the composer as the soloist.[1]

Movements

The concerto is scored for solo piano, flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings. As is typical with concertos, it is in three movements:

  1. Allegro
  2. Romanze
  3. Allegro assai

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make music part of your life series: Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 27 in G, K. 379


[youtube.com/watch?v=qWsJgmPBEyU]

Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 27

in G, K. 379

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791).
Composed April 1781, in Vienna.
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at: http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/
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HISTORIC MUSICAL MOMENTS: Clara Haskil: Schumann – ‘Abegg’ Variations, Op. 1


[youtube.com/watch?v=UqOvdlthl8E]

Clara Haskil: Schumann – ‘Abegg’ Variations, Op. 1

Clara Haskil (7 January 1895 – 7 December 1960) was a Romanian classical pianist, renowned as an interpreter of the classical and early romantic repertoire. Haskil was particularly noted for her performances and recordings of Mozart. Many considered her the foremost interpreter of Mozart in her time. She was also noted as a superb interpreter of Beethoven, Schumann, and Scarlatti. Haskil was born into a Sephardic Jewish family in Bucharest, Romania and studied in Vienna under Richard Robert (whose memorable pupils also included Rudolf Serkin and George Szell) and briefly with Ferruccio Busoni. She later moved to Paris, where she started studying with Gabriel Fauré’s pupil Joseph Morpain, whom she always credited as one of her greatest influences. The same year she entered the Paris Conservatoire, officially to study with Alfred Cortot although most of her instruction came from Lazare Lévy and Mme Giraud-Letarse, and graduated at age 15 with a Premier Prix. She also graduated with a Premier Prix in violin. Upon graduating, Haskil began to tour Europe, though her career was cut short by one of the numerous physical ailments she suffered throughout her life. In 1913 she was fitted with a plaster cast in an attempt to halt the progression of scoliosis. Frequent illnesses, combined with extreme stage fright that appeared in 1920, kept her from critical or financial success. Most of her life was spent in abject poverty. It was not until after World War II, during a series of concerts in the Netherlands in 1949, that she began to win acclaim. Well regarded as a chamber musician, Haskil collaborated with such famed musicians as George Enescu, Eugène Ysaÿe, Pablo Casals, Joseph Szigeti, Géza Anda, Isaac Stern and Arthur Grumiaux, with whom she played her last concert. While renowned primarily as a violinist, Grumiaux was also a fine pianist, and he and Haskil would sometimes swap instruments. She played as a soloist under the baton of such conductors as Ansermet, Barbirolli, Baumgartner, Beecham, Boult, Celibidache, Cluytens, Fricsay, Giulini, Inghelbrecht, Jochum, Karajan, Kempe, Klemperer, Kubelík, Markevitch, Monteux, Münch, Paray, Rosbaud, Sawallisch, Solti, Stokowski, Szell, among many others. One of her most prominent performances as a soloist with an orchestra is recording of Mozart’s Piano Concertos Nos. 20 and 24 in November 1960 with Orchestre des Concerts Lamoureux conducted by Igor Markevitch (issued on CD by Philips Classics under No. 464 718-2); this recording features an unusually slow, pensive performance of K466’s part III and a very subtle, highly lyrical and yet, in some way, vigorous playing of K491’s part II. Haskil died from injuries received through a fall at the staircase of a Brussels train station. She was to play a concert with Arthur Grumiaux the following day. An esteemed friend of Haskil, Charles Chaplin, described her talent by saying “In my lifetime I have met three geniuses; Professor Einstein, Winston Churchill, and Clara Haskil. I am not a trained musician but I can only say that her touch was exquisite, her expression wonderful, and her technique extraordinary.” (Swiss Radio interview, 19 April 1961.) The Clara Haskil International Piano Competition is held biannually in her memory. The brochure reads: “The Clara Haskil Competition was founded in 1963 to honour and perpetuate the memory of the incomparable Swiss pianist, of Romanian origin, who was born in Bucharest in 1895. It takes place every two years in Vevey, Switzerland, where Clara Haskil resided from 1942 until her death in Brussels in 1960. A street in Vevey bears her name. The Competition welcomes young pianists from all over the world, who pursue the musical ideal that is inspired by Clara Haskil and which will always remain exemplary.”… http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clara_Ha…

A link to this wonderful artists personal Website: http://www.deccaclassics.com/cat/sing…

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Mozart – Violin Concerto No. 4 in D, K. 218


[youtube.com/watch?v=La08LYpRiWY]

Mozart – Violin Concerto No. 4 in D, K. 218

Violin Concerto No. 4 in D major K. 218 was composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in 1775 in Salzburg. The autograph of the score is preserved in Biblioteka Jagiellońska, Kraków. The concerto has the usual fast-slow-fast structure and lasts around 23 minutes. The movements are:
1. Allegro
2. Andante cantabile
and 3. Rondeau (Andante grazioso – Allegro ma non troppo).
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at: http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/
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NOTE: I do not know who the performers of this are, nor the place and date of recording!!! Any suggestions are welcome.

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Danzi – Variations on a Theme from Mozart’s “Don Giovanni”


[youtube.com/watch?v=Von6wwFQHvo]

Danzi – Variations on a Theme from Mozart‘s “Don Giovanni

Variations on ‘La ci darem la mano’ from Mozart’s opera Don Giovanni, for Cello & Orchestra, by Franz Danzi (1763-1826). Raphael Wallfisch is the soloist, with the Northern Chamber Orchestra conducted by Nicholas Ward.

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Chopin – Variations on “Là ci darem la mano” from Mozart’s Don Giovanni


[youtube.com/watch?v=8dbGJJrshoU]

ChopinVariations on “Là ci darem la mano” from Mozart‘s Don Giovanni

Frédéric Chopin’s Variations on “Là ci darem la mano” for piano and orchestra, Op. 2, was written in 1827, when he was aged only 17. “Là ci darem la mano” is a duet sung by Don Giovanni and Zerlina, from Mozart’s opera Don Giovanni. It was one of the earliest manifestations of Chopin’s incipient genius. It inspired Robert Schumann‘s famous exclamation, Hats off, gentlemen! A genius!

The work was premiered on 11 August 1829 at the Vienna Kärntnertortheater, with Chopin as the soloist. It received very positive audience and critical acclaim.

The work is in B-flat major throughout, except for the Adagio of Variation 5, which is in the minor key.

– Introduction: Largo – Poco piu mosso 0:00
– Thema: Allegretto 5:20
– Variation 1: Brillante 6:53
– Variation 2: Veloce, ma accuratamente 7:52
– Variation 3: Sempre sostenuto 8:54
– Variation 4: Con bravura 10:20
– Variation 5: Alla Polacca 11:24

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Mozart: Symphony No.29 – André Previn Wiener Philharmoniker(2000Live)


[youtube.com/watch?v=sXMRimMFV7M]

Mozart: Symphony No.29André Previn Wiener Philharmoniker (2000Live)

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
Symphony No.29 in A major, K.201
André Previn
Wiener Philharmoniker
Festspielhaus, Salzburg, 28 1/2000

The Symphony No. 29 in A major, K. 201/186a, was completed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on 6 April 1774.[1] It is, along with Symphony No. 25, one of his better known early symphonies. Stanley Sadie characterizes it as “a landmark … personal in tone, indeed perhaps more individual in its combination of an intimate, chamber music style with a still fiery and impulsive manner.”[2]

Structure

The symphony is scored for 2 oboes, 2 horns and strings, as was typical of early-period Mozart symphonies.

There are four movements:

  1. Allegro moderato, 2/2
  2. Andante, 2/4
  3. Menuetto: Allegretto – Trio, 3/4
  4. Allegro con spirito, 6/8

The first movement is in sonata form, with a graceful principal theme characterized by an octave drop and ambitious horn passages. The second movement is scored for muted strings with limited use of the winds, and is also in sonata form. The third movement, a minuet, is characterized by nervous dotted rhythms and staccato phrases; the trio provides a more graceful contrast. The energetic last movement, another sonata-form movement in 6/8 time, connects back to the first movement with its octave drop in the main theme.

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Great Compositions/Performances: W. A. Mozart – Symphony No. 41 “Jupiter” in C major, K. 551 (1788)


[youtube.com/watch?v=zK5295yEQMQ]

W. A. MozartSymphony No. 41 “Jupiter” in C major, K. 551 (1788):
1. Allegro vivace, 4/4
2. Andante cantabile, 3/4 in F major
3. Menuetto: Allegretto – Trio, 3/4
4. Molto allegro, 2/2

The Chamber Orchestra of Europe
Conductor – Nicolaus Harnoncourt
Grosser Musikvereinsaal Wien

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Mozart: Overture – ‘Lucio Silla’


[youtube.com/watch?v=1sukIWVPRa8]

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (German: [ˈvɔlfɡaŋ amaˈdeus ˈmoːtsaʁt], English see fn.), name Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart (27 January 1756 — 5 December 1791), was a prolific and influential composer of the Classical era. Mozart showed prodigious ability from his earliest childhood. Already competent on keyboard and violin, he composed from the age of five and performed before European royalty. At 17, he was engaged as a court musician in Salzburg, but grew restless and travelled in search of a better position, always composing abundantly. While visiting Vienna in 1781, he was dismissed from his Salzburg position. He chose to stay in the capital, where he achieved fame but little financial security. During his final years in Vienna, he composed many of his best-known symphonies, concertos, and operas, and portions of the Requiem, which was largely unfinished at the time of his death. The circumstances of his early death have been much mythologized. He was survived by his wife Constanze and two sons. Mozart learned voraciously from others, and developed a brilliance and maturity of style that encompassed the light and graceful along with the dark and passionate. He composed over 600 works, many acknowledged as pinnacles of symphonic, concertante, chamber, operatic, and choral music. He is among the most enduringly popular of classical composers, and his influence on subsequent Western art music is profound; Beethoven composed his own early works in the shadow of Mozart, and Joseph Haydn wrote that “posterity will not see such a talent again in 100 years…http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolfgang…

Lucio Silla (pronounced /ˈluːtʃoʊ ˈsɪlɒ/, Italian pronunciation: [ˈluːtʃo ˈsiːlla]), K. 135, is an Italian opera in three acts composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The libretto was written by Giovanni de Gamerra. It was first performed on 26 December 1772 at the Teatro Regio Ducal in Milan and was regarded as “a moderate success”. Handel’s opera Silla (1713) covered the same subject…http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucio_Silla


A link to this wonderful artists Website:http://www.classicalarchives.com/moza…

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Fabulous Musical Moments: Mozart Concerto No. 20 in D Minor K466 Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa


[youtube.com/watch?v=FBVITUka_30]

Mozart Concerto D Minor K466 Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa

Filmed live May 20, 2012, Freiburg im Breisgau ,Germany
Cadenzas by Mozart’s favorite student – and billiards pal, Jan Nepomuk Hummel 🙂 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Mozart – Symphony No 40 in G minor, K 550 – Harnoncourt


[youtube.com/watch?v=AP8trFKjpKw]
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Symphony No 40 in G minor, K 550

1. Molto allegro
2. Andante
3. Menuetto. Allegretto – Trio
4. Finale. Allegro assai

The Chamber Orchestra of Europe
Nikolaus Harnoncourt, conductor

Live recording, 1984

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 20 in C, K.303


[youtube.com/watch?v=9Yt97xhurk8]

Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 20 in C, K.303

I. Adagio – Molto allegro [0:00]
II. Tempo di Menuetto [5:04]

Sigiswald Kuijken, violin
Luc Devos, fortepiano

performed on period instruments

Painting of Mozart family by Johann Nepomuk della Croce

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Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 7 in F for Three Pianos, K. 242 (Lodron)


[youtube.com/watch?v=cgO-bs3vGxc]

Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 7 in F for Three Pianos, K. 242 (Lodron)

In 1776, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composed three piano concertos, one of which was the Concerto in F for Three Pianos and Orchestra, No. 7, K. 242. He originally finished K. 242 for three pianos in February 1776. However, when he eventually recomposed it for himself and another pianist in 1780 in Salzburg, he rearranged it for two pianos, and that is how the piece is often performed today. The concerto is often nicknamed “Lodron” because it was commissioned by Countess Antonia Lodron to be played with her two daughters Aloysia and Giuseppa.
It has three movements:
1. Allegro
2. Adagio
3. Rondo: Tempo di Minuetto
Girdlestone, in his Mozart and his Piano Concertos, describes the concerto and compares one of the themes of its slow movement to similar themes that turn up in later concertos – especially No. 25 (K. 503) – in more developed forms.
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Make Music Part of Your Life: Mozart Violin Sonata K.301 Hilary Hahn & Natalie Zhu



W. A. Mozart Sonata for violin and piano in G major, K.301/293a (No.18)

Violin Sonata No. 18 in G Major (K 301) was composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in March 1778 in Mannheim, Germany and was first published in the same year as part of Mozart’s Opus 1 collection, which was dedicated to Maria Elisabeth, Electress of the Palatinate and are consequently known as the Palatine Sonatas.

The work consists of two movements:

– [Allegro con spirito]
– [Allegro]

Hilary Hahn (violin/violon)
Natalie Zhu (piano)
Official website : http://www.hilaryhahn.com/index.html 
Deutsche Grammophon :http://www.deutschegrammophon.com/art…

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Mozart – Missa Brevis in C, K. 259 (Organ Solo Mass)



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
Composed December 1775/1776 in Salzburg.
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Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 27 in G, K. 379



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791).
Composed April 1781, in Vienna.
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Artist
Arthur Grumiaux

 

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Make music Part of Your Life Series: Mozart:Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, K. 467 (Elvira Madigan) Pollini/Muti



Mozart:Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, K. 467

Orchestra Filarmonica della Scala
Maurizio Pollini, piano
Riccardo Muti, conductor
(2004)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Piano Concerto No. 21 in C majorK. 467, was completed on March 9, 1785 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, four weeks after the completion of the previous D minor concerto, K. 466.[1][2]

The concerto has three movements:

 

  1. Allegro maestoso; in common time. The tempo marking is in Mozart’s catalog of his own works, but not in the autograph manuscript.[3]
  2. Andante in F major. In both the autograph score and in his personal catalog, Mozart notated the meter as Alla breve[4]
  3. Allegro vivace assai

Recordings:  This work has been recorded numerous times by many famous pianists including Géza AndaPiotr Anderszewski,Vladimir AshkenazyDaniel BarenboimMalcolm BilsonAlfred BrendelRobert CasadesusIvan DrenikovAnnie FischerWalter GiesekingFriedrich GuldaStephen HoughKeith JarrettWilhelm KempffWalter KlienAlicia de LarrochaGiorgi LatsabidzeRosina LhevinneDinu LipattiRadu LupuMurray PerahiaMaria João Pires,Maurizio PolliniArthur RubinsteinFazil SayAndrás SchiffArtur SchnabelRudolf SerkinHoward Shelley,Mitsuko Uchida, and Christian Zacharias.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Mozart / Divertimento in B-flat major, K. 137



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

Divertimento in B-flat major for string quartet, K. 137/125b (1772)
00:00 – Andante
07:52 – Allegro di molto
11:17 – Allegro assai
(Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields Chamber Ensemble (1986))

“Three early Mozart pieces, K. 137, 137 and 138, are labeled divertimentos on the manuscripts and are so listed in Grove. However, few Mozart scholars accept that tag as an accurate description of the works, and most doubt that the title came from Mozart. For one thing, a divertimento should have two minuets, and these three have none. At first glance they seem to be straightforward string quartets–yet many experts contend that they don’t sound at all like string quartets. 

So what are they? Mozart scholar Alfred Einstein fancies them as small symphonies for strings, to which the composer was prepared to add extra parts for winds; they are sometimes known as the ‘Salzburg symphonies.’ Musicologist Hans Keller has given them the curious designation of ‘orchestral quartets.’ Others insist that they are indeed string quartets even if they lack the serious temper of that rarefied form. Yet (to complete the confusion) they are universally referred to as divertimentos–the one thing everyone agrees they are not.

Whatever they’re called, they are fine examples of Mozart’s early essays in chamber music…Mozart composed them in 1772, when he was 16, not long before leaving Salzburg on his third (and, as it turned out, his last) trip to Italy. He was going to Milan to produce the opera ‘Lucio Silla‘ on a commission from Count Firmian, governor-general of that city. He probably expected, from previous experience, to need music to entertain the count’s court while he was at work on the opera. So it seems likely that these three works were composed to meet that need. Mozart may have planned to present them with a small orchestra, as Einstein surmises, but here they are played by the four instruments of a string quartet.

The Divertimento in B flat, K. 137…differs from [K. 136 & K. 138] by starting with a slow movement. This affecting ‘Andante’ is led by the first violin and is punctuated by dramatic responses from the accompanying strings. A spirited ‘Allegro di molto’ movement follows, leading to a delicate finale marked ‘Allegro assai’. This section, while not actually a minuet, has a courtly air that suggests a roomful of dancers bowing and curtsying under brilliant chandeliers.” – Harvey B. Loomis

Painting: Still Life (Morning Glories, Toad, & Insects), Otto Marseus van Schrieck

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Mozart Symphony No 40 G minor K 550 Karl Bohm Wiener Philarmoniker



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Symphony No 40 G minor K 550Karl Bhom conducts Wiener Philarmoniker:

 

 

 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

 

Molto allegro 0:40
Andante 9:42
Menuetto, allegretto 17:25
Finale, allegro assai 22:05

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote his Symphony No. 40 in G minor, KV. 550, in 1788. It is sometimes referred to as the “Great G minor symphony,” to distinguish it from the “Little G minor symphony,” No. 25. The two are the only extant minor key symphonies Mozart wrote.[1]

 

 

 

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Leonid Kogan – Mozart – Adagio in E major, K 261


Leonid Kogan – Mozart – Adagio in E major, K 261

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart:
Adagio in E major for violin and orchestra, K 261
Leonid Kogan, violin
Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra
Pavel Kogan, conductor
(Live recording, May 1981)

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  • Artist
    Leonid Kogan, Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra, Pavel Kogan

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Mozart – Serenade in G major, K. 525 ‘Eine kleine Nachtmusik’ -Conductor: Jordi Savall Le Concert des Nations Ensemble


[youtube.com/watch?v=-lNrbusiAvY]

Mozart Serenade ‘Eine kleine Nachtmusik’ in G major, K.525 / Jordi Savall

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756 † 1791)
Written: 1787; Vienna, Austria
Work: Serenade No.13 for strings in G major “Eine kleine Nachtmusik”, K.525

01. Allegro
02. Romance (Andante)
03. Menuetto (Allegretto) – Trio
04. Rondo (Allegro)

Performer:
Violin: Manfredo Kraemer
Violin II: Pablo Valetti
Viola: Angelo Bartoletti
Cello: Bruno Cocset
Double-bass: Xavier Puertas

Conductor: Jordi Savall
Le Concert des Nations Ensemble

Artwork: Fete in a Wood by Nicolas Lancret

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Eine kleine Nachtmusik (Serenade No. 13 for strings in G major), K. 525, is a 1787 composition for a chamber ensemble by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The German title means “a little serenade,” though it is often rendered more literally but less accurately as “a little night music.”[1] The work is written for an ensemble of two violinsviola, and cello with optional double bass, but is often performed by string orchestras.[2]

 

Allegro

 

Eine kleine nachtmusik.svg

Composition, publication, and reception

The serenade was completed in Vienna on 10 August 1787,[2] around the time Mozart was working on the second act of his opera Don Giovanni.[3] It is not known why it was composed.[4] Hildesheimer (1991, 215), noting that most of Mozart’s serenades were written on commission, suggests that this serenade, too, was a commission, whose origin and first performance were not recorded.

The traditionally used name of the work comes from the entry Mozart made for it in his personal catalog, which begins, “Eine kleine Nacht-Musik.”[5] As Zaslaw and Cowdery point out, Mozart almost certainly was not giving the piece a special title, but only entering in his records that he had completed a little serenade.[6]

The work was not published until about 1827, long after Mozart’s death, by Johann André in Offenbach am Main.[2] It had been sold to this publisher in 1799 by Mozart’s widow Constanze, part of a large bundle of her husband’s compositions.

Today the serenade is widely performed and recorded; indeed both Jacobson (2003, 38) and Hildesheimer (1992, 215) opine that the serenade is the most popular of all Mozart’s works. Of the music, Hildesheimer writes, “even if we hear it on every street corner, its high quality is undisputed, an occasional piece from a light but happy pen.”[7]

BIRTHDAY OF MOZART


Birthday of Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born in Salzburg, Austria, on this day in 1756. His achievements in composing operas, chamber music, symphonies, and piano concerti have earned him a reputation as one of the greatest musical geniuses of all time. Mozart’s birthday is observed by musical societies all over the world, who often give concerts of his music on this day. The city of his birth also honors him at the end of January with Mozart WeekMore… Discuss

 

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GREAT COMPOSERS/COMPOSITIONS: Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 23 in A, K. 488


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Photo credit: photoAtlas)

The Piano Concerto No. 23 in A major (K. 488) is a musical composition for piano and orchestra written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. It was finished, according to Mozart’s own catalogue, on March 2, 1786, around the time of the premiere of his opera, The Marriage of Figaro. It was one of three subscription concerts given that spring and was probably played by Mozart himself at one of these. The concerto is scored for piano solo and an orchestra consisting of one flute, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns and strings. In Mozart’s later works the wind instruments are equal to the stringed instruments, and this is also the case in this concerto. It has three movements:
1. Allegro in A major and common time.
2. Adagio in F-sharp minor and 6/8 time (in later editions, the tempo is listed as Andante).
3. Allegro assai in A and alla breve (in later editions, the tempo is listed as Presto). In Rondo form.
The first movement is mostly sunny and positive with the occasional melancholic touches typical of Mozart pieces in A major and is in sonata form. The piece begins with a double exposition, the first played by the orchestra, and the second when the piano joins in. The first exposition is static from a tonal point of view and is quite concise, the third theme is not yet revealed. The second exposition includes the soloist and is modulatory. It is also includes the third previously unheard third theme. The second exposition is ornamented as opposed to the first exposition which is not. The second theme has harmonic tension. This is expressed by dissonances that are played on the beat, and then solved by an interval of a second going downwards. This is also expressed in the use of chromatics in the melody and bass lines which is a cause for harmonic tension, as the listeners anticipate the arrival of the tonic.
The second, slow movement, in ternary form, is melancholic and somewhat operatic in tone. The piano begins alone with a theme characterized by unusually wide leaps. This is the only movement by Mozart in F sharp minor. The dynamics are soft throughout most of the piece. The middle of the movement contains a brighter section in A major announced by flute and clarinet that Mozart would later use to introduce the trio “Ah! taci ingiusto core!” in his opera Don Giovanni. The third movement is a vigorous and cheerful rondo, shaded by moves into other keys as is the opening movement (to C major from E minor and back during the secondary theme in this case, for instance) and with a central section whose opening in F sharp minor is interrupted by a clarinet tune in D major, an intrusion that reminds us, notes Girdlestone, that instrumental music at the time was informed by opera buffa and its sudden changes of point of view as well as of scene. 

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Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Mozart – Symphony No. 35 in D, K. 385 “Haffner”



Symphony No. 35 in D major, K. 385, was composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in 1782 and is also called the Haffner Symphony.

Symphony was written in the key of D major. The symphony is in four movements:
1. Allegro con spirito, 4/4
2. Andante, 2/4
3. Menuetto, 3/4
4. Presto, 2/2.

It was commissioned by the Haffners, a prominent Salzburg family, for the occasion of Sigmund Haffner’s ennoblement. The Haffner Symphony should not be confused with the eight-movement Haffner Serenade, another piece Mozart wrote on commission from the same family in 1776. The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in D and G, 2 trumpets in D, timpani, and strings. Mozart’s choice of key for the Haffner Symphony is an aspect that catches one’s attention. According to Cuyler, “the key of D major, which was so felicitous for the winds, served Mozart more often than any other key, even C, for his symphonies,” including the Paris (No. 31) and Prague (No. 38) symphonies. The key is also indicative of the work’s serenade origins as all of Mozart’s orchestral serenades are scored in D major. 
The Haffner Symphony usually runs somewhere around 20 minutes in length. A recording by George Szell with the Cleveland Orchestra (Sony SBK 46333) runs 19.11; one by Iona Brown with the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields (Haenssler CD 94.003) is 21.09; and one by Sir Neville Marriner also with the same ensemble (Philips 420 486-2) runs 21.34. 
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Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 35 in A, K.526



Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 35 in A, K.526:

I. Molto allegro [0:00]
II. Andante [9:30]
III. Presto [19:50]

Sigiswald Kuijken, violin
Luc Devos, fortepiano

– performed on period instruments

– Painting of Mozart by Barbara Krafft

Mozart – Quintet for Piano and Winds in E flat, K. 452



The Quintet in E flat major for Piano and Winds, K. 452, was completed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on March 30, 1784 and premiered two days later at the Imperial and Royal National Court Theater in Vienna. Shortly after the premiere, Mozart wrote to his father that “I myself consider it to be the best thing I have written in my life.” It is scored for piano, oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon. There are three movements:
1. Largo – Allegro moderato
2. Larghetto
3. Allegretto
This structure closely resembles that of a typical sonata. The first movement is a sprightly sonata form Allegro, with themes being passed from instrument to instrument, usually with the piano introducing a theme and accompanying while the oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon play variations on it. The Larghetto movement is typical of the 2nd movement of other Mozart pieces: soft and gentle, yet still engaging. The Allegretto movement is a “sonata-rondo” of the kind Mozart used as the finale of many of the piano concertos he was writing at this period, and contains a written-out cadenza-like section toward the end.
This piece was the inspiration for the Quintet in E flat for Piano and Winds, Op. 16, by Ludwig van Beethoven, who composed this tribute in 1796. Both compositions use the same scoring. 
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Mozart – 3 German Dances, K. 605



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart‘s Three German Dances (Teutsche), K. 605, are a set of three dance pieces composed by Mozart in 1791. Most of Mozart’s German Dances were written whilst he held the position of Kammermusicus (Imperial Chamber Composer) in Vienna. Mozart had been appointed to this position on the 1st December 1787 by Emperor Joseph II. The position was offered following the death of the former Kammermusicus, Christoph Willibald Gluck on 15 November 1787. In the position Mozart earned 800 Florins a year. One of the main obligations of his position was to write music for the court dances and balls that were held in the Redoutensaal (Public Ballrooms) of the Imperial Palace in Vienna. Mozart was an enthusiastic dancer, and produced many dance works, including ten sets of German dances. The first set was written in February 1787, before Mozart’s appointment to Kammermusicus. The other sets, excluding K. 611, were written between December 1787 and 1791, during which Mozart also wrote well known pieces such as Symphonies 40 and 41, and his opera Così fan tutte. These were mostly written in sets of six, with one set of four and one of twelve. Mozart composed this set of three Teutsche (German Dances) in the early months of 1791. The three dances of K. 605 are usually listed with the six dances of K. 600 and the four of K. 602 as Dreizehn deutsche Tänze (Thirteen German Dances). The pieces first appear on 12 February 1791 on Mozart’s List of all my Works, and are the penultimate set of German Dances that Mozart would compose before his death on 5 December 1791. The dances are scored for piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani, violins I and II, violoncellos, and double basses. The third dance uniquely adds two posthorns and five sleigh bells tuned to C, E, F, G, and A (in ascending order). As the name “Three German Dances” suggests, this set of dances includes three individual dances. Each dance changes in instrumentation; only the violins play in all three dances. Each dance varies in character because of this, and each includes various features:
-Dance 1: The first dance begins with a series of repeating phrases that have a rich texture and are emphasised by the violins. Small, light fanfares can be heard throughout the piece being played by the trumpets. At the end of the dance the main theme from the beginning of the dance is repeated in a characterful ending.
-Dance 2: The main tune is once again played by the violins at the beginning, and this main tune is repeated, as is the next phrase. However, this repeat is played at a lower dynamic. The main tune then passes on to a characterful woodwind section. This is followed by an almost waltz-like phrase which has a clear, steady beat that could have easily been danced to.
-Dance 3 Schlittenfahrt: This dance may have been written independently of the others, as it is very different in style. Schlittenfahrt means “Sleigh Ride“; the use of sleigh bells in the piece clearly emphasises this. Before the sleigh bells enter, there is a series of repeating phrases that pass between the trumpets, woodwind and violins. The topography of the dynamics of the tuned sleigh bells make the piece seem like a sleigh ride, as the dynamics rise and fall like a sleigh would over snow. This is followed by a beautiful but simple trumpet solo that gives a very peaceful and clear atmosphere to the piece, like a winter’s day. The original repeating phrases then return, but end with a majestic fanfare from the trumpets that passes to the other instruments, then returns to the sleigh bells and trumpet solo again. The piece ends with a diminuendo of the trumpet solo.
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NOTE: I do not know who the performers of this are, nor the place and date of recording!!! Any suggestions are welcome.

 

Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 9 in E flat, K. 271(Jeunehomme)



The Piano Concerto No. 9 “Jeunehomme” in E flat major, K. 271, by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was written in Salzburg in 1777, when Mozart was 21 years old.
The work has long been known as the “Jeunehomme” Concerto. It was said that Mozart wrote the piece for a French pianist “Jeunehomme” when she visited Salzburg. But scholars couldn’t identify the woman for whom he actually wrote it. Recently, the musicologist Michael Lorenz has argued that the woman was actually Victoire Jenamy (1749-1812), a daughter of Jean-Georges Noverre, a famous dancer who was one of Mozart’s best friends. The work is scored for solo piano, two oboes, two horns, and strings.
It consists of three movements:
1. Allegro, in E-flat major and common (C) time 10:30
2. Andantino, in C minor and 3/4 time 12:00
3. Rondo (Presto), in E flat major and cut time 10:00
The first movement opens, unusually for the time, with interventions by the soloist, anticipating Beethoven’s Fourth and Fifth Concertos. As Girdlestone (1964) notes, its departures from convention do not end with this early solo entrance, but continue in the style of dialogue between piano and orchestra in the rest of the movement. Mozart wrote two cadenzas for this movement.
The second movement is written in the relative minor key. In only five of Mozart’s piano concertos is the second movement in a minor key (K. 41, K. 271, K. 456, K. 482, and K. 488. K. 41 is an arrangement). Mozart wrote two cadenzas for this movement.
The third movement which opens with the solo piano is in a rondo form on a large scale. It is interrupted, surprisingly, by a slow minuet section (a procedure Mozart would repeat with his 22nd concerto, 1785, also in the key of E-flat). The work ends in the original tempo. The work is highly regarded by critics. Charles Rosen has called it “perhaps the first unequivocal masterpiece [of the] classical style.” Alfred Brendel has called it “one of the greatest wonders of the world.” Alfred Einstein dubbed it “Mozart’s Eroica.” 
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Johanes Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Symphony No.20 in D major, (K 133)


Álbum: Mozart, Complete Works Vol. 1: Symphonies Complete
Interprete del álbum: Jaap Ter Linden & Mozart Akademie Amsterdam
Compositor: Johanes Chrysostomus Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

 

Fabulous Musical Compositions/Fabulous Performances: Variations on ‘La ci darem la mano’ Mozart’s Don Giovanni Op 2 in Bb – Chopin



Variations on ‘La ci darem la mano’ Mozart‘s Don Giovanni Op 2 in Bb 
Piano: Idil Biret
The Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia
The Frederic Chopin Complete Works
Follow Our Twitter:@FrederykChopin

Introduction 0:00
Theme 5:19 – Allegretto
Variation I 6:52 – Brillante
Variaton II 7:52 – Veloce, ma accuratamente
Variation III 8:52 – Sempre sostenuto
Variation IV 10:19 – Con bravura
Variation V 11:25 – Adagio- alla polacca

 

Mozart – Overture The Abduction from the Seraglio (K.384) – Wiener Symphoniker – Fabio Luisi



Mozart – The Abduction From The Seraglio Overture
Die Entführung aus dem Serail
Wiener Symphoniker Japan Tour 2006
Conductor : Fabio Luisi

 

Mozart – Piano Sonata No. 16 in C, K. 545 (Facile)



The Piano Sonata No. 16 in C major, K. 545, by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was described by Mozart himself in his own thematic catalogue as “for beginners,” and it is sometimes known by the nickname Sonata facile or Sonata semplice. Mozart added the work to his catalogue on June 26, 1788, the same date as his Symphony No. 39. The exact circumstances of the work’s composition are not known, however. Although the piece is well-known today, it was not published in Mozart’s lifetime and first appeared in print in 1805. A typical performance takes about 14 minutes. The work has three movements:
1. Allegro
2. Andante
3. Rondo
The first movement is written in sonata form and is in the key of C major. The familiar opening theme is accompanied by an Alberti bass, played in the left hand.
A bridge passage composed of scales follows, arriving at a cadence in G major, the key in which the second theme is then played. A codetta follows to conclude the exposition, then the exposition is repeated. The development starts in G minor and modulates through several keys. The recapitulation begins, unusually, in the subdominant key of F major. According to Charles Rosen, the practice of beginning a recapitulation in the subdominant was “rare at the time [the sonata] was written,” though the practice was later taken up by Franz Schubert. The second movement is in the key of G major, the dominant key of C major. The music modulates in the middle of this movement to the parallel minor (G minor) and its relative major (B-flat major). The movement then modulates to the tonic, and, after the main theme and development is heard again, ends.
The third movement is in rondo form and is in the tonic key, C major. The first theme is lively and sets the mood of the piece. The second theme is in G major and contains an Alberti bass in the left hand. The first theme appears again and is followed by a third theme. The third theme is in a minor key and modulates through many different keys before modulating into C major. The first theme appears again followed by a coda and finally ends in C major.
The finale was transcribed to F major and collected with a solo piano arrangement of the second movement of the violin sonata in F major to form the Piano Sonata in F major, K. 547a.
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and http://imslp.org/wiki/

 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Concerto for Flute, Harp, and Orchestra in C major, K. 299



Mozart – Flute and Harp Concerto in C, K. 299
The Concerto for Flute, Harp, and Orchestra in C major, K. 299 is a piece by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart for flute, harp, and orchestra. It is one of only two true double concertos that he wrote, as well as the only piece of music that Mozart wrote that contains the harp. The piece is one of the most popular such concerti in the repertoire, as well as often being found on recordings dedicated otherwise to either one of its featured instruments. The concerto was written in April 1778 by Mozart during his sojourn to Paris for the Court of Guînes. It was commissioned (although never paid for) from Mozart, by the flautist Duke of Guînes, Adrien-Louis de Bonnières, and his harpist daughter who was taking composition lessons from the composer. The soloists in the piece will sometimes play with the orchestra, and at other times perform as a duo while the orchestra is resting. The flute and harp alternate having the melody and accompanying lines. In some passages, they also create counterpoint with just each other. Mozart concertos are standard in how they move harmonically, as well as that they adhere to the three-movement form of fast–slow–fast:
I. Allegro
The orchestra states both themes. The first is immediately present, and the second is introduced by the horn. Both themes fall under the conventional sonata form. The soli then re-work the already present themes.
I. Andantino
The short phrases in this movement are introduced by the strings, and become lyrically extended. This further develops into variations on the theme. The cadenza in this movement leads to a coda, where the orchestra and soli focus on the lyrical theme.
III. Rondeau — Allegro
The harmonic form is: A–B–C–D–C–B–{cadenza}–A(coda). Some music theorists feel that this is actually more of an arch than a typical rondo form, because music from the A section is still audible in the C and D sections.
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/

Frantisek Ignac Tuma (1704-1774) Sinfonia in b flat major



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
František Ignác Antonín Tůma (Kostelec nad OrlicíBohemia,
October 2, 1704 – Vienna, January 30, 1774) was an important Czech composer of the Baroque era. Born in Kostelec nad Orlici, Bohemia, he lived the greater part of his life inVienna, first as director of music for Count Franz Ferdinand Kinsky, later filling a similar office for the widow of Emperor Karl VI. He was an important late-baroque composer, organist, gambist and theorbist.

Tůma’s music belongs stylistically to the late Baroque. His sacred works, which were known to Haydn and Mozart, were noted by his contemporaries for their solidity of texture and their sensitive treatment of the text as well as for their chromaticism. His instrumental music includes trio and quartet sonatas, sinfonias and partitas, mostly for strings and continuo; some of them were clearly intended for orchestral use.

Among his sacred works we find some 65 masses, 29 psalms and 5 settings of the Stabat Mat

 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Flute Quartet #4 in A K 298



The Flute Quartet No. 4 in A major, K. 298, by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is Mozart’s final composition for flute quartet. Unlike the previous three quartets, written for the flutist Ferdinand De Jean, the Quartet in A is believed to have been written for recreational purposes, as opposed to on commission. The low Köchel number is misleading. The work is thought to have been written sometime in 1786 or 1787, only a few years before the composer’s death.
It is in three movements:
1. Andante, Theme and variations
2. Menuetto, D major, 3/4
3. Rondeau: [Allegretto grazioso], 2/4
The third movement is notable for its almost humorously detailed tempo indication: “Rondieaoux: Allegretto grazioso, ma non troppo presto, pero non troppo adagio. Così-così—non molto garbo ed espressione” (or, translated, “A joke rondo: Allegretto grazioso, but not too fast, nor too slow. So-so—with great elegance and expression”).
A typical performance lasts about 11 minutes.
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/

 

Mozart – Symphony No. 40 in G minor, K. 550



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote his Symphony No. 40 in G minor, KV. 550, in 1788. It is sometimes referred to as the “Great G minor symphony,” to distinguish it from the “Little G minor symphony,” No. 25. The two are the only minor key symphonies Mozart wrote. The 40th Symphony was completed on 25 July 1788. The composition occupied an exceptionally productive period of just a few weeks in 1788, during which time he also completed the 39th and 41st symphonies (26 June and 10 August, respectively). The symphony is scored (in its revised version) for flute, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, and strings. Notably missing are trumpets and timpani.
The work is in four movements, in the usual arrangement (fast movement, slow movement, minuet, fast movement) for a classical-style symphony:
1. Molto allegro, 2/2
2. Andante, 6/8
3. Menuetto. Allegretto — Trio, 3/4
4. Finale. Allegro assai, 2/2.
Every movement but the third is in sonata form; the minuet and trio are in the usual ternary form. This work has elicited varying interpretations from critics. Robert Schumann regarded it as possessing “Grecian lightness and grace”. Donald Francis Tovey saw in it the character of opera buffa. Almost certainly, however, the most common perception today is that the symphony is tragic in tone and intensely emotional; for example, Charles Rosen (in The Classical Style) has called the symphony “a work of passion, violence, and grief.”
Although interpretations differ, the symphony is unquestionably one of Mozart’s most greatly admired works, and it is frequently performed and recorded. Ludwig van Beethoven knew the symphony well, copying out 29 measures from the score in one of his sketchbooks. It is thought that the opening theme of the last movement may have inspired Beethoven in composing the third movement of his Fifth Symphony
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at:http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/