Tag Archives: Multiple myeloma

Ibuprofen as Skin Cancer Prevention?


Ibuprofen as Skin Cancer Prevention?

The use of over-the-counter painkillers may lower one’s risk of squamous cell skin cancer—typically caused by sun exposure—by 15 percent, according to a new study. Researchers suspect that Ibuprofen and naproxen—the active ingredients found in the popular drugs Advil, Motrin, and Aleve—disrupt the proteins in the body that contribute to cancerous tumors. The scientists caution that more research is necessary, since painkillers carry their own risks. More… Discuss

from http://www.ehealthme.com/ds/ibuprofen/multiple+myeloma:

Summary: Multiple myeloma is found among people who take Ibuprofen, especially for people who are male, 60+ old, have been taking the drug for < 1 month, also take medication Zometa, and have Multiple myeloma.

We study 57,989 people who have side effects while taking Ibuprofen from FDA and social media. Among them, 171 have Multiple myeloma. Find out below who they are, when they have Multiple myeloma and more.

You are not alone: join a mobile support group for people who take Ibuprofen and have Multiple myeloma >>>

New Multiple Myeloma Drug Set to Begin Clinical Trials|Specialty Pharmacy TIme


Specialty Pharmacy News

Treatment inhibits key process that enables cancer cells to multiply.

Researchers in London plan to begin clinical trials on a significant new treatment for multiple myeloma by the end of next year.

In laboratory testing, the drug, known as DTP3, killed myeloma cells within human cells and mice without causing any toxic side effects. In a paper published on October 13, 2014 in Cancer Cells, researchers outlined how the drug inhibits a key process that allows cancer cells to multiply.

“Lab studies suggest that DTP3 could have therapeutic benefit for patients with multiple myeloma and potentially several other types of cancer, but we will need to confirm this in our clinical trials, the first of which will start next year,” said lead researcher Professor Guido Franzoso in a press release.

DTP3 was developed through an evaluation of the mechanisms that enable cancer cells to continue multiplying beyond their normal lifespan. Specifically, the researchers studied a protein called nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB), which plays a key role in inflammation, in addition to immune and stress response systems.

“We had known for many years that NF-kB is very important for cancer cells, but because it is also needed by healthy cells, we did not know how to block it specifically,” Franzoso said. “The discovery that blocking the GADD45β/MKK7 segment of the NF-κB pathway with our DTP3 peptide therapeutic selectively kills myeloma cells could offer a completely new approach to treating patients with certain cancers, such as multiple myeloma.” – See more at: http://www.specialtypharmacytimes.com/news/New-Multiple-Myeloma-Drug-Set-to-Begin-Clinical-Trials#sthash.XGAUTmks.Gyz2Cy02.dpuf

via New Multiple Myeloma Drug Set to Begin Clinical Trials.

this pressed-for your informantion: Pitt researcher finds pathway that leads to multiple myeloma growth – Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


Pitt researcher finds pathway that leads to multiple myeloma growth – Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

When stressed cells go into survival mode and try repairing themselves, bad things can happen. One impact is a biological pathway that can support cancer and promote its progression.

This is a story about one such pathway in multiple myeloma, the most devastating tumor-bone disease.

The associate professor of dental medicine, with a doctoral degree in oral health sciences at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, is an endodontist, or root-canal specialist. Her research is what excited the NIH.

“We’ve identified a novel pathway and the role of that pathway in modulating the bone-marrow environment on a microenvironment level in support of multiple myeloma,” Ms. Ouyang said…

 

this pressed-from Science Friday: Giving Viruses a License to Kill…Cancer


Giving Viruses a License to Kill…Cancer.

Giving Viruses a License to Kill…Cancer The lab of Dr. Mark Federspiel at the Mayo Clinic, where the measles virus is being grown in bioreactors for the next clinical trial coming up in September. Photo by Mayo Clinic

this pressed: Multiple Myeloma: International Myeloma Foundation : • health professionals : imwg conference series : The IMWG Conference Series “Making Sense of Treatment” June 11, 2014


 

Multiple Myeloma: International Myeloma Foundation : • health professionals : imwg conference series : The IMWG Conference Series “Making Sense of Treatment” June 11, 2014.

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news: Measles Virus Used to Wipe Out Cancer (multiple myeloma)


Measles Virus Used to Wipe Out Cancer

Researchers are cautiously optimistic about an experimental cancer treatment that uses a modified measles virus to target and kill cancerous cells. Two out of six multiple myeloma patients who were treated with extremely high doses of the engineered viruses responded to the treatment, with one appearing to enter into complete remission. These two patients were found to have few or no circulating measles antibodies, important because this affords the virus a chance to attack the cancer cells before the patient’s immune system begins fighting off the virus. More… Discuss

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Pomalidomide for Multiple Myeloma – National Cancer Institute


Pomalidomide for Multiple Myeloma – National Cancer Institute.

 

Otto Kahler

Otto Kahler (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

Multiple myeloma
Classification and external resources
Plasmacytoma ultramini1.jpg

Micrograph of a plasmacytoma, the histologiccorrelate of multiple myeloma. H&E stain
ICD10 C90.0
ICD9 203.0
ICD-O: M9732/3
OMIM 254500
DiseasesDB 8628
MedlinePlus 000583
eMedicine med/1521
MeSH D009101

 

Pomalidomide
Pomalidomide2DACS.svg
Systematic (IUPAC) name
4-Amino-2-(2,6-dioxopiperidin-3-yl)isoindole-1,3-dione
Clinical data
Trade names Imnovid, Pomalyst
Licence data EMA:LinkUS FDA:link
Pregnancy cat. (US)
Legal status POM (UK) -only (US)
Routes Oral
Pharmacokinetic data
Protein binding 12–44%
Metabolism Hepatic (mostly CYP1A2 andCYP3A4 mediated; some minor contributions by CYP2C19 andCYP2D6)
Half-life 7.5 hours
Excretion Urine (73%), faeces (15%)
Identifiers
CAS number 19171-19-8 Yes
ATC code L04AX06
PubChem CID 134780
ChemSpider 118785 
UNII D2UX06XLB5 
ChEMBL CHEMBL43452 
Chemical data
Formula C13H11N3O4 
Mol. mass 273.24 g/mol

 

 

 

 

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