Tag Archives: Musée du Louvre

Please take a little time and answer the survey: Thank you!


 PLease take a little time and answer the survey: Thank you !

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The Champs-Élysées


The Champs-Élysées

This avenue in Paris, France, leads from the Place de la Concorde to the Arc de Triomphe. It is divided in two by the Rond-Point des Champs-Élysées. The lower part, toward the Place de la Concorde, is surrounded by gardens, museums, theaters, and restaurants. The upper part, toward the Arc de Triomphe, was traditionally a luxury commercial district. Twelve avenues radiate to form a star at the avenue’s upper end, with the Arc de Triomphe at its center. To what does the avenue’s name refer? More… Discuss

Joe Dassin Champs Elysées Lyrics

 
Les Champs-Élysées Video:

Paroles de Les Champs-Élysées Je m’baladais sur l’avenue
Le coeur ouvert à l’inconnu
J’avais envie de dire bonjour
À n’importe qui
N’importe qui ce fut toi
Je t’ai dit n’importe quoi
Il suffisait de te parler
Pour t’apprivoiser

Aux Champs-Élysées
Aux Champs-Élysées
Au soleil, sous la pluie
À midi ou à minuit
Il y a tout ce que vous voulez
Aux Champs-Élysées

Tu m’as dit “J’ai rendez-vous
Dans un sous-sol avec des fous
Qui vivent la guitare à la main
Du soir au matin”
Alors je t’ai accompagnée
On a chanté, on a dansé
Et l’on n’a même pas pensé
À s’embrasser

Aux Champs-Élysées
Aux Champs-Élysées
Au soleil, sous la pluie
À midi ou à minuit
Il y a tout ce que vous voulez
Aux Champs-Élysées

Hier soir deux inconnus
Et ce matin sur l’avenue
Deux amoureux tout étourdis
Par la longue nuit
Et de l’Étoile à la Concorde
Un orchestre à mille cordes
Tous les oiseaux du point du jour
Chantent l’amour

Aux Champs-Élysées
Aux Champs-Élysées
Au soleil, sous la pluie
À midi ou à minuit
Il y a tout ce que vous voulez
Aux Champs-Élysées

[ Ces sont Les Champs-Élysées Paroles sur http://www.parolesmania.com/ ]

A la découverte de l’encyclopédie Larousse (access here)


A la découverte de l'encyclopédie Larousse

A la découverte de l’encyclopédie Larousse (access here)

The Mona Lisa


The Mona Lisa

One of the most famous paintings in history, Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa can be seen at the Louvre museum in Paris, where it is on permanent display. The work’s name was not chosen by the artist; rather, it was derived from a posthumously published biography of da Vinci, which identifies the subject as Lisa, wife of a wealthy Florentine businessman. Still, her identity remains the subject of debate, and theories regarding the owner of the enigmatic smile abound. What are some of them? More… Discuss

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THE CHÂTEAU


The Château

Though the French word château is translated into English as “castle,” there are certain nuances that differentiate it from its English counterpart. For example, stately residences both fortified and unfortified may be châteaus, but only if they are in the countryside. Thus, the Louvre was once a château but lost the designation once urban sprawl made it a part of Paris, whereas opulent—yet rural—Versailles Palace is considered a château. What term is used for equivalent urban structures? More… Discuss

 

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This Day in History: Mona Lisa Stolen by a Louvre Employee (1911)


Mona Lisa Stolen by a Louvre Employee (1911)

In 1911, Leonardo da Vinci‘s Mona Lisa disappeared from the Louvre. For the next two years, the painting was believed to be lost forever, until it was discovered that former Louvre employee Vincenzo Peruggia had stolen it by hiding in a closet and walking out with it hidden under his coat after the museum had closed. Peruggia was caught after he returned to his native Italy and tried to sell the painting to a gallery owner. What vandalism attempts has the painting survived over the years? More… Discuss