Tag Archives: New England Journal of Medicine

“Bubble Boys” Lose Bubbles Thanks to Gene Therapy


“Bubble Boys” Lose Bubbles Thanks to Gene Therapy

Historically, patients with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), an often fatal congenital disorder in which the cells involved in immune responses fail to work properly, have been kept in isolation in a sterile environment to protect them from infection. Currently, the only long-term treatment for so-called bubble boy disease is a bone marrow transplant, but an experimental gene therapy is showing promise for boys with X-linked SCID. Of the nine babies given the treatment, six developed immune systems capable of fighting off infection. More… Discuss

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New Ebola Projections: 1.4 Million Cases by Late January


New Ebola Projections: 1.4 Million Cases by Late January

Last month, the World Health Organization estimated that 20,000 people could contract Ebola by mid-2015, but revised projections now indicate that this number could be reached as early as November. By January, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of infected could rise as high as 1.4 million. New data also indicate that this outbreak is deadlier than previously believed, killing 70 percent of those who contract the illness. More… Discuss

NEWS: BRAIN DEVELOPMENT DISRUPTION IN THE WOMB LINKED TO AUTISM


Brain Development Disruption in the Womb Linked to Autism

Autism has been the focus of intense study in recent years, but experts are still far from understanding the root causes of the disorder. For a time, childhood vaccines were thought to be the culprit, but this theory has since been largely debunked. Now scientists have found evidence that the foundations for autism may be set in the womb, during prenatal brain development. Autistic children’s brains show a much higher incidence of cortical abnormalities in regions involved in language and social and emotional communication than their non-autistic peers. Abnormalities were identified in the brains of 90% of the children with autism studied, whereas only 10% of unaffected children exhibited abnormalities. More… Discuss

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ICU STAYS LINKED TO LONG-TERM COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENTS


ICU Stays Linked to Long-Term Cognitive Impairments

Patients who spend time in an intensive care unit (ICU) are known to be susceptible to delirium that is thought to stem not from their illnesses but from the unique ICU environment: the 24/7 activity, harsh stimuli, unfamiliar people, uncomfortable procedures, and overwhelming technology. Doctors have long believed that this mental confusion disappears when patients are discharged from the ICU, but that may not be the case. Researchers have found that even a year after leaving the hospital, many patients who suffered delirium in the ICU continued to exhibit cognitive deficits similar to someone with moderate traumatic brain injury or even Alzheimer’s disease.More… Discuss