Tag Archives: new yorker

word: banality


banality 

Definition: (noun) The condition or quality of being banal; triviality.
Synonyms: unoriginality, predictability, dullness, ordinariness, staleness, vapidity, triteness
Usage: My friends pursued their course with uneventfulness; they had no longer any surprises for me; even their love-affairs had a tedious banality. Discuss.
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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: LEO CALVIN ROSTEN (1908)


Leo Calvin Rosten (1908)

Rosten was an American teacher, screenwriter, and humorist. He is best remembered for his stories about a night-school “prodigy” named Hyman Kaplan, which debuted in The New Yorker in the 1930s and were later published in book form under a pseudonym. His The Joys of Yiddish is a humorous guide to the Yiddish language and Jewish culture. Rosten is quoted as having once said that “any man who hates dogs and babies can’t be all bad!” To whom was he referring when he made this remark? More… Discuss

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QUOTATION: George Eliot


All honor and reverence to the divine beauty of form! Let us cultivate it to the utmost in men, women, and children—in our gardens and in our houses. But let us love that other beauty too, which lies in no secret of proportion, but in the secret of deep human sympathy.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

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This day in History: SHIRLEY JACKSON’S “THE LOTTERY” IS PUBLISHED (1948)


Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” Is Published (1948)

Published by the The New Yorker the same month it was written, Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” instantly became one of the most controversial stories ever run by the esteemed magazine. Hundreds of outraged readers cancelled their subscriptions or wrote letters expressing their confusion and anger over the story’s meaning. Now considered a classic, the chilling story matter-of-factly describes an annual lottery in a bucolic American town in which one person is selected for what? More… Discuss