Tag Archives: oboe

Alessandro Marcello, Concerto in D minor for Oboe, Strings Orchestra and Continuo: make music part of your life series


Alessandro Marcello, Concerto in D minor for Oboe, Strings Orchestra and Continuo

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Henrik Chaim Goldschmidt plays “Gabriel’s Oboe” : great compositions/performances


Henrik Chaim Goldschmidt plays “Gabriel’s Oboe

The oboist Henrik Chaim Goldschmidt plays Ennio Morricone’s “Gabriel’s Oboe” with The Faroe Islands Philharmonic Orchestra, 10.01.2009

http://www.singh-goldschmidt.dk

Elevazione – Adagio para oboé violoncelo, orquestra de cordas e orgão. Domenico Zipoli: make music part of your life series


Elevazione – Adagio para oboé violoncelo, orquestra de cordas e orgão. Domenico Zipoli

 FROM

Recital de formatura em oboé. Oboé: Lília Reis; Cello: Rodolpho Borges.
Escola de Música de Brasília. 10/09/2009.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Domenico Zipoli (17 October 1688 – 2 January 1726) was an Italian Baroque composer who worked and died in Córdoba (Argentina). He became a Jesuit in order to work in the Reductions of Paraguay where his musical expertise contributed to develop the natural musical talents of the Guaranis. He is remembered as the most accomplished musician among Jesuit missionaries.

Early training and career

Zipoli was born in Prato, Italy, where he received elementary musical training. However, there are no records of him having entered the cathedral choir. In 1707, and with the patronage of Cosimo III, Grand Duke of Tuscany, he was a pupil of the organist Giovani Maria Casini in Florence. In 1708 he briefly studied under Alessandro Scarlatti in Naples, then Bologna and finally in Rome under Bernardo Pasquini. Two of his oratorios date to this early period: San Antonio di Padova (1712) and Santa Caterina, Virgine e martire (1714). Around 1715 he was made the organist of the Church of the Gesù (a Jesuit parish, the mother church for The Society of Jesus), in Rome, a prestigious post. At the very beginning of the following year, he finished his best known work, a collection of keyboard pieces titled Sonate d’intavolatura per organo e cimbalo.

Jesuit musician-missionary

For reasons that are not clear, Zipoli travelled to Sevilla, Spain, in 1716, where, on 1 July, he joined the Society of Jesus with the desire to be sent to the Reductions of Paraguay in Spanish Colonial America. Still a novice, he left Spain with a group of 53 missionaries who reached Buenos Aires on 13 July 1717.

He completed his formation and sacerdotal studies in Cordoba (in contemporary Argentina) (1717–1724) though, for the lack of an available bishop, he could not be ordained priest. All through these few years he served as music director for the local Jesuit church. Soon his works came to be known in Lima, Peru. Struck by an unknown infectious disease, Zipoli died in the Jesuit house of Cordoba, on 2 January 1726. A previous theory placing his death in the ancient Jesuit church of Santa Catalina, in the hills of the Province of Córdoba (Argentina), has now been discredited. His burial place has never been found.

Legacy

Zipoli continues to be well known today for his keyboard music. His Italian compositions have always been known but recently some of his South American church music was discovered in Chiquitos, Bolivia: two Masses, two psalm settings, three Office hymns, a Te Deum laudamus and other pieces. A Mass copied in Potosí, Bolivia in 1784, and preserved in Sucre, Bolivia, seems a local compilation based on the other two Masses. His dramatic music, including two complete oratorios and portions of a third one, is mostly gone. Three sections of the ‘Mission opera’ San Ignacio de Loyola – compiled by Martin Schmid in Chiquitos many years after Zipoli’s death, and preserved almost complete in local sources – have been attributed to Zipoli.

Society of Jesus
The JHS or IHS monogram of the name of Jesus (...

The JHS or IHS monogram of the name of Jesus (or traditional Christogram symbol of western Christianity), derived from the first three letters of the Greek name of Jesus, Iota-Eta-Sigma (ΙΗΣΟΥΣ). Partly based on memories of church decorations. Has some degree of resemblance to a portion of the emblem of the Jesuits, due to common medieval influences (see Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus), but is not exactly the same, nor intended to be so. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

History of the Jesuits
Regimini militantis
Suppression

Jesuit Hierarchy
Superior General
Adolfo Nicolás

Ignatian Spirituality
Spiritual Exercises
Ad majorem Dei gloriam
Magis

Notable Jesuits
St. Ignatius of Loyola
St. Francis Xavier
St. Peter Faber
St. Aloysius Gonzaga
St. Robert Bellarmine
St. Peter Canisius
St. Edmund Campion
Pope Francis

 

 

A. Marcello – Oboe Concerto in d minor (Marcel Ponseele, baroque oboe / Il Gardellino)



Alessandro Marcello (1684~1750)

Concerto per Oboe, Archi e Basso Continuo in re minore, SF 935 – Op.1 
(First published in 1717)

I. Andante e spiccato – 00:00
II. Adagio – 03:32
III. Presto – 07:09

Marcel Ponseele (Baroque Oboe)
Ensemble Il Gardellino 
Marcel Ponseele (conductor)

A slightly older contemporary of Antonio Vivaldi, Marcello held concerts at his hometown of Venice. He composed and published several sets of concertos, including six concertos under the title of La Cetra (The Lyre), as well as cantatas, arias, canzonets, and violin sonatas. Marcello often composed under the pseudonym Eterio Stinfalico, his name as a member of the celebrated Arcadian Academy (Pontificia Accademia degli Arcadi). He died in Padua in 1747. Alessandro’s brother was Benedetto Marcello (1686~1739), also a composer.

Although his works are infrequently performed today, Marcello is regarded as a very competent composer. His La Cetra concertos are “unusual for their wind solo parts, concision and use of counterpoint within a broadly Vivaldian style,” according to Grove, “placing them as a last outpost of the classic Venetian Baroque concerto.”

A concerto Marcello wrote in d minor for oboe, strings and basso continuo is perhaps his best-known work. Its worth was attested to by Johann Sebastian Bach who transcribed it for harpsichord (BWV 974). A number of editions have been published of the famous Oboe Concerto in d minor. The edition in c minor is credited to Benedetto Marcello.

 

Gabriel’s Oboe (from “The Mission”) Ennio Morricone 2002 Arena Concert (Just a Question: Doesn’t it feel as if, volens nolens, we all have become “The Mission” ? Think about it!)


Gabriel’s Oboe (from “The Mission“) Ennio Morricone 2002 Arena Concert
Just a Question followed by a thought: Doesn’t it feel as if, volens nolens, we all have become “The Mission” ? Think about it: We are losing the ability to express FREE! We are losing freedom! We are losing the ability to repair freedom! Are we Free! Free from what, Free of what, or rather oppressed in the most private of our, yes,  thoughts even ?

Charles Gounod – Petite Symphonie



Charles Gounod – Petite Symphonie, for flute, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 french horns and 2 bassons.
Adagio. Allegretto.
Andante cantabile.
Scherzo.
Finale.

Collegium Musicum, Copenhagen:
Toke Lund Christiansen, flute.
Bjørn Carl Nielsen, Gert Herzberg, oboe.
Niels Thomsen, Jørgen Misser Jensen, clarinet.
Søren Elbo, Klaus Tônshoff, basset horn.
Per McClelland Jacobsen, Leif Lind, Henning Hansen, Kjeld Rud Pedersen, french horn.
Asger Svendsen, Klaus Fredriksen, bassoon.
Frederikke Svendsen, double basson.
Michael Schønwandt, conductor.

 

Ciocarlia- George Enescu


Ciocarlia- George Enescu
violin- Claudiu Hontila
oboe- Dan Gadea
viola- Sorin Gherbanovschi
cello- Gyula Ortenszki