Tag Archives: Oklahoma

San Gabriel River Bikeway River End Cafe to Liberty Park (Speedified X6)


San Gabriel River Bikeway River End Cafe to Liberty Park (Speedified X6)

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Dust Bowl The Dust Bowl – The Plow That Broke The Plains (1936) Documentary. News Core re-score. History.


Dust Bowl


The Dust Bowl – The Plow That Broke The Plains (1936) Documentary. News Core re-score. History.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


For other uses, see Dust Bowl (disambiguation).

 
A farmer and his two sons during a dust storm in Cimarron County, Oklahoma, 1936, Photo: Arthur Rothstein

The Dust Bowl, also known as the Dirty Thirties, was a period of severe dust storms that greatly damaged the ecology and agriculture of the US and Canadian prairies during the 1930s; severe drought and a failure to apply dryland farming methods to prevent wind erosion (the Aeolian processes) caused the phenomenon. The drought came in three waves, 1934, 1936, and 1939–40, but some regions of the High Plains experienced drought conditions for as many as eight years.[1] With insufficient understanding of the ecology of the Plains, farmers had conducted extensive deep plowing of the virgin topsoil of the Great Plains during the previous decade; this had displaced the native, deep-rooted grasses that normally trapped soil and moisture even during periods of drought and high winds. The rapid mechanization of farm equipment, especially small gasoline tractors, and widespread use of the combine harvester contributed to farmers’ decisions to convert arid grassland (much of which received no more than 10 inches (250 mm) of precipitation per year) to cultivated cropland.[citation needed]

During the drought of the 1930s, the unanchored soil turned to dust, which the prevailing winds blew away in huge clouds that sometimes blackened the sky. These choking billows of dust – named “black blizzards” or “black rollers” – traveled cross country, reaching as far as such East Coast cities as New York City and Washington, D.C. On the Plains, they often reduced visibility to 1 metre (3.3 ft) or less. Associated Press reporter Robert E. Geiger happened to be in Boise City, Oklahoma to witness the “Black Sunday” black blizzards of April 14, 1935; Edward Stanley, Kansas City news editor of the Associated Press coined the term “Dust Bowl” while rewriting Geiger’s news story.[2][3]

The drought and erosion of the Dust Bowl affected 100,000,000 acres (400,000 km2) that centered on the panhandles of Texas and Oklahoma and touched adjacent sections of New Mexico, Colorado, and Kansas.[4]

The Dust Bowl forced tens of thousands of families to abandon their farms. Many of these families, who were often known as “Okies” because so many of them came from Oklahoma, migrated to California and other states to find that the Great Depression had rendered economic conditions there little better than those they had left. Author John Steinbeck wrote Of Mice and Men (1937) and The Grapes of Wrath (1939) about migrant workers and farm families displaced by the Dust Bowl.

 

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

January 29

1813   Jane Austin publishes Pride and Prejudice.
1861   Kansas is admitted into the Union as the 34th state.
1865   William Quantrill and his Confederate raiders attack Danville, Kentucky.
1918   The Supreme Allied Council meets at Versailles.
1926   Violette Neatley Anderson becomes the first African-American woman admitted to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court.
1929   The Seeing Eye, America’s first school for training dogs to guide the blind, founded in Nashville, Tennessee.
1931   Winston Churchill resigns as Stanley Baldwin’s aide.
1942   German and Italian troops take Benghazi in North Africa.
1944   The world’s greatest warship, Missouri, is launched.
1950   Riots break out in Johannesburg, South Africa, over the policy of Apartheid.
1967   Thirty-seven civilians are killed by a U.S. helicopter attack in Vietnam.
1979   President Jimmy Carter commutes the sentence of Patty Hearst.
1984   President Ronald Reagan announces that he will run for a second term.
1984   The Soviets issue a formal complaint against alleged U.S. arms treaty violations.
1991   Iraqi forces attack into Saudi Arabian town of Kafji, but are turned back by Coalition forces.
Born on January 29
1737   Thomas Paine, political essayist (The Rights of Man, The Age of Reason).
1843   William McKinley, 25th President of the United States.
1880   W.C. Fields, comedian and actor (David Copperfield, My Little Chickadee).

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.ET1pFIYd.dpuf

word: stentorian


Word of the Day

stentorian

Definition: (adjective) Extremely loud.
Synonyms: booming
Usage: He was woken by the stentorian voice of his teacher, demanding to know why he wasn’t paying attention. Discuss

this pressed-for information: 12 states confirm Enterovirus D68 cases|CNN


http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/16/health/enterovirus-outbreak/

Watch this video

click to access site and play the video.

(CNN) — Since mid-August, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has confirmed more than 100 cases of Enterovirus D68 in 12 states: Alabama, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Montana, New York and Oklahoma.

Yet the real number of severe respiratory illnesses caused by this virus is probably even higher, the CDC says.

Enteroviruses are very common, especially in the early fall. The CDC estimates that 10 million to 15 million infections occur in the United States each year. These viruses usually present like the common cold; symptoms include sneezing, a runny nose and a cough.

Most people recover without any treatment. But Enterovirus D68 appears to be exacerbating breathing problems in children who have asthma.

What parents should know

The virus is hard to track, as many enteroviruses cause similar symptoms and hospitals generally do not test for specific types. But the CDC has asked hospitals across the country to send in samples if workers suspect that Enterovirus D68 has caused a patient’s severe respiratory illness.

Alabama, Indiana and Oklahoma are the latest to join the growing list of states with confirmed cases, health officials say.

Seven of 24 specimens sent to the CDC from Oklahoma hospitals and laboratories have tested positive for Enterovirus D68, the Oklahoma State Department of Health announced Tuesday. The state has seen an increase in pediatric admissions at hospitals in its central region.

Watch this video

So why all the concern now?

What’s unusual at the moment is the high number of hospitalizations.

The virus has sent more than 30 children a day to a Kansas City, Missouri, hospital, where about 15% of the youngsters were placed in intensive care, officials said.

“It’s worse in terms of scope of critically ill children who require intensive care. I would call it unprecedented,” said Dr. Mary Anne Jackson, a director for infectious diseases at Children’s Mercy Hospital, where about 475 children were recently treated.

“I’ve practiced for 30 years in pediatrics, and I’ve never seen anything quite like this,” she said.

What parents should know about EV-D68

What’s special about this particular type of enterovirus?

An analysis by the CDC showed at least 30 of the Kansas City children tested positive for EV-D68, Missouri health officials said.

It’s a type of enterovirus that’s uncommon, but not new.

It was first identified in the 1960s and there have been fewer than 100 reported cases since that time. But it’s possible, Pallansch said, that the relatively low number of reports might be because EV-D68 is hard to identify.

EV-D68 was seen last year in the United States and this year in various parts of the world. Over the years, clusters have been reported in Georgia, Pennsylvania, Arizona and various countries including the Philippines, Japan and the Netherlands.

Experts say they don’t know why it’s flared up this time around.

“Why one virus or another crops up in one part of the country or another part of the country from one year to the next is inexplicable,” said William Schaffner, head of the Department of Preventive Medicine at Vanderbilt University. “It’s a mystery to me.”

What are the symptoms?

“Access the article published at CIDRAP, (you can access CIDRAP, as you recall with the side bar widget at euzicasa)
Another post (this pressed will follow shortly): get informed, be your family and yourselves best friends, no matter what the downplayer may want you to believe; then you can be level headed instead of fearing, and in denial!

Today’s Birthday: ALICE BROWN DAVIS (1852)


Alice Brown Davis (1852)

The Indian Removal Act of 1830 forced Native Americans to leave their lands within state borders and relocate to unsettled land in the West. Brown Davis, whose mother was a Seminole, grew up on the new Indian Territory and cared for Seminoles during a cholera epidemic when she was a teen. Once the US government began dismantling tribal governments to push Oklahoma toward statehood, Brown Davis acted as the Seminoles’ interpreter in court and became their first female chief, serving for how long?More… Discuss