Tag Archives: Old age

health news: Canes and Walkers May Increase Fall Risk


Canes and Walkers May Increase Fall Risk

Many elderly people use canes and walkers to get around, but a new study reveals how dangerous these aids can be when used without proper training. Untrained users tend to drag the cane or walker, thus creating a dangerous gait pattern that increases the risk of falling. The study focused on 43 older adults in an assisted living facility and found that those using walking aids were nearly four times more likely to fall than those without aids. Experts recommend training individuals to use such devices as well as instructing them in balance recovery and gait exercises. More… Discuss

news: Rare Rhino on Brink of Extinction


In the News

Rare Rhino on Brink of Extinction

A northern white rhino died at the San Diego Zoo this week, leaving only five in the world. Only one male remains, and is considered unable to reproduce naturally due to old age. An international team of experts is now considering ways to save the species, including the possibility of in vitro fertilization. Hopes for natural breeding were dashed earlier this year when a younger male died in October. Northern white rhinos have been hunted to near extinction for their horns. More… Discuss

healthwise and such: Stop and Smell the Roses


Stop and Smell the Roses

One’s sense of smell, more specifically the loss of one’s sense of smell, could be an indicator of impending death. A study finds that older adults whose sense of smell has declined have a greater risk of dying within five years. Of participants with the most severe olfactory dysfunction, 39 percent passed away within five years. By comparison, just 19 percent of those with moderate dysfunction and 10 percent of those with a normal sense of smell died during that same period. This is not to say that the loss of sense of smell is directly causing deaths. Rather, researchers believe, it is a warning sign of declining health. More… Discuss

News: Norway Best Country for Older People


Norway Best Country for Older People

Growing old is never easy, but for some it is easier than others, and where they live has a lot to do with it. An index evaluating the quality of life of older adults in 96 countries around the globe has ranked Norway the best country in the world for older people, followed closely by Sweden, Switzerland, Canada, and Germany. Australia, Western Europe, and North America also rank high on the list. The index weighs factors such as income security, health, personal capability, and whether the elderly live in an “enabling environment.” More… Discuss

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Dementia


Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Dementia

Older adults with severe vitamin D deficiency have an increased risk of developing dementia, a recent study has found. This does not necessarily mean that vitamin D deficiency is a cause of dementia, as it is also possible that another unknown factor could cause someone to have both low vitamin D levels and dementia. Further study is needed to determine the nature of the relationship between vitamin D and dementia, but if it is indeed found to be a causal relationship, it could mean that simply eating more vitamin D-rich foods or taking supplements could reduce dementia risk in later life. More… Discuss

Pope Francis: Jesus asked us to always be at the service of others


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Pope Francis: Jesus asked us to always be at the service of others

On Holy Thursday Mass, he tenderly washed the feet of 12 disabled and elderly people. Pope Francis celebrated one of the most important ceremonies of the year surrounded by the sick. His Holy Thursday Mass took place at the St. Mary of Providence Center, for the Don Carlo Gnocchi Foundation.

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NEWS: POSSESSIONS WEIGH ON THE ELDERLY


Possessions Weigh on the Elderly

As we age, we tend to accumulate more and more material possessions, and it becomes harder and harder to let them go. Though the majority of people in their 70s believe they have too many material things, they are reluctant to sell or give away any of their belongings. While this may seem like a minor issue, having too much stuff can deter older adults from moving to a smaller, more manageable home or one better suited to their needsMore… Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Victor Hugo


When grace is joined with wrinkles, it is adorable. There is an unspeakable dawn in happy old age.

Victor Hugo (1802-1885) Discuss

 

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NEWS: POOR SLEEP LINKED TO ACHES AND PAINS


Poor Sleep Linked to Aches and Pains

A good night’s sleep could help keep you pain free. Then again, being in pain could prevent you from sleeping well. A recent study found that people over age 50 who suffer from sleep problems are almost twice as likely as those who sleep well to develop widespread pain. Poor sleep quality was the strongest predictor of pain studied, surpassing anxiety, osteoarthritis, cognitive impairment, and physical health, among other factors. Further investigation is needed to determine whether non-restorative sleep is a cause of widespread pain or vice versa. More… Discuss

 

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NEWS: BRAIN TRAINING WARDS OFF AGE-RELATED COGNITIVE DECLINE


 

Brain Training Wards Off Age-Related Cognitive Decline

 

As people age, certain cognitive abilities decline. However, there are things that can be done to delay and minimize these losses. Older adults who participated in

 

Deutsch: Phrenologie

 

10 to 12 60- to 75-minute brain training sessions saw improvements in memory, reasoning skills, and processing speed that persisted for years after. The memory gains began to taper off after the 5-year mark, while reasoning ability and processing speed benefits could still be detected 10 years later. More… Discuss

 

 

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4 more dead from heat-related causes – Chicago Tribune


4 more dead from heat-related causes - Chicago Tribune

4 more dead from heat-related causes - Chicago Tribune

Tips for Preventing Heat-Related Illness

The best defense is prevention. Here are some prevention tips:

  • Photo of athlete drinking water.Drink more fluids (nonalcoholic), regardless of your activity level. Don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink. Warning: If your doctor generally limits the amount of fluid you drink or has you on water pills, ask him how much you should drink while the weather is hot.
     
  • Don’t drink liquids that contain alcohol or large amounts of sugar–these actually cause you to lose more body fluid. Also, avoid very cold drinks, because they can cause stomach cramps.
     
  • Stay indoors and, if at all possible, stay in an air-conditioned place. If your home does not have air conditioning, go to the shopping mall or public library–even a few hours spent in air conditioning can help your body stay cooler when you go back into the heat. Call your local health department to see if there are any heat-relief shelters in your area.
     
  • Electric fans may provide comfort, but when the temperature is in the high 90s, fans will not prevent heat-related illness. Taking a cool shower or bath, or moving to an air-conditioned place is a much better way to cool off.
     
  • Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing.
     
  • NEVER leave anyone in a closed, parked vehicle.
     
  • Although any one at any time can suffer from heat-related illness, some people are at greater risk than others. Check regularly on:
     

    • Infants and young children
    • People aged 65 or older
    • People who have a mental illness
    • Those who are physically ill, especially with heart disease or high blood pressure
       
  • Visit adults at risk at least twice a day and closely watch them for signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Infants and young children, of course, need much more frequent watching.

If you must be out in the heat:

  • Photo of woman relaxing in the shade.Limit your outdoor activity to morning and evening hours.
     
  • Cut down on exercise. If you must exercise, drink two to four glasses of cool, nonalcoholic fluids each hour.  A sports beverage can replace the salt and minerals you lose in sweat. Warning: If you are on a low-salt diet, talk with your doctor before drinking a sports beverage. Remember the warning in the first “tip” (above), too.
     
  • Try to rest often in shady areas.
     
  • Protect yourself from the sun by wearing a wide-brimmed hat (also keeps you cooler) and sunglasses and by putting on sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher (the most effective products say “broad spectrum” or “UVA/UVB protection” on their labels).

This information provided by NCEH’s Health Studies Branch.

(Source: http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/heattips.asp)