Tag Archives: Olympic Games

this day in the yesteryear: Opening of the First Modern Olympic Games (1896)


Opening of the First Modern Olympic Games (1896)

In 1894, after efforts by Frenchman Pierre de Coubertin to revive the ancient Greek Olympics, the newly established International Olympic Committee appointed the Greek capital of Athens as the host city for the first modern international Olympic Games. Held between April 6 and 15, 1896, the games drew athletes from 14 countries for several athletic events, including the first modern marathon. Though women were not allowed to compete, one woman protested the day after the marathon by doing what? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Mark Spitz (1950)


Mark Spitz (1950)

During the 1972 Summer Olympic Games in Munich, Germany, Jewish-American swimmer Mark Spitz shot to sporting fame when he captured seven gold medals, a feat unequaled by any other athlete in a single Olympiad until 2008. Spitz also set new world records for each of the events in which he took the gold. Having thus brought his total Olympic medal count up to 11—he had won two gold, one silver, and one bronze in 1968—Spitz retired from competition. What other historic event marked the 1972 Games? More… Discuss

Access Mark Spitz’s official website    HERE

this day in the yesteryear: Jim Thorpe’s Olympic Medals Posthumously Restored (1983)


Jim Thorpe’s Olympic Medals Posthumously Restored (1983)

Jim Thorpe, an American Olympian, excelled at every sport he played and is deemed one of the greatest athletes in modern sports history. He won Olympic gold medals in the pentathlon and decathlon but was stripped of his awards amid reports that he had played minor league baseball before participating in the 1912 Olympic Games. At the time, strict rules barred professional athletes from Olympic competition. What loophole enabled Thorpe’s supporters to have his medals posthumously restored? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Spiridon Louis (1873)


Spiridon Louis (1873)

Following the decision to revive the Olympic Games at the end of the 19th century, all eyes were on Athens, where the first modern games were held in 1896. Greek competitor Spiridon Louis won the first marathon event of the games and instantly became a national hero. He was first across the finish despite having allegedly taken a break from the race to have a glass of wine at an inn. It helped that some of his competitors collapsed along the way. Why was the third-place finisher disqualified? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Jesse Owens (1913)


Jesse Owens (1913)

Owens was an African-American track-and-field star famous for his performance at the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games, where he claimed four gold medals in the presence of Adolf Hitler and Nazi leaders, who had hoped the games would promote their idea of racial superiority. Though hailed as a hero, Owens faced segregation upon his return to the US, even suffering the humiliation of having to use a freight elevator to attend a reception in his honor. How did he earn a living after the Olympics? More… Discuss

Ice Dancing


Ice Dancing

In ice dancing, couples are required to perform choreographed dance routines on ice. It differs from pair skating in that it does not allow movements of strength, such as jumps or overhead lifts. Ice dance routines are similar to ballroom dances, and, typically, partners are not supposed to separate by more than two arm-lengths. The sport gained popularity in the 1930s, and the first world championships were held in 1950. When did ice dancing become an Olympic event? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Kiel Week


Kiel Week

Kiel Week is an international sailing regatta in Kiel, Germany, in the last week of June, at which the world’s leading yachters compete. Craft of all sorts—sail, motor, and muscle-powered—race on the waters of the Kiel Fjord. Kiel Week began in 1882 with 20 yachts; today there are well over 1,000 yachts competing in three classes of races—international, Olympic, and offshore regattas—as well as more than 1,000 events ranging from talks by international political leaders to art exhibits, theater, and music. More… Discuss

this day in the yeasteryear: The International Olympic Committee Is Founded (1894) (THIS POST IS NOT EXPLOITED BY coca-cola)


The International Olympic Committee Is Founded (1894)

Based in Lausanne, Switzerland, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) was founded following efforts by Pierre de Coubertin to reinstate the ancient Olympic Games that were first held in Greece in 776 BCE. Today, the IOC constitutes a single legal entity that organizes the Summer and Winter Olympic Games and owns copyrights, trademarks, and other intangible properties associated with the Games, such as the Olympic logos. What is the maximum number of members the IOC can have? More… Discuss

ARTICLE: CURLING


Curling

Curling is a team sport in which players slide heavy stones with handles toward a target or “tee.” The stones closest to the tee at the end of play earn points. After a stone is hurled, players called “sweepers” use special brooms to sweep the ice ahead of the stone. This affords them some measure of control over the stone’s trajectory and allows them to get it closer to the tee or even knock away or block the opposing team’s stones. Though curling is very popular in Canada, it originated where? More…

 

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Todays Birthday: EMIL ZÁTOPEK (1922)


Emil Zátopek (1922)

Zátopek, the “Czech Locomotive,” was a long-distance runner who won three gold medals at the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki. He won gold in the 5,000-m and 10,000-m runs, and he amazingly earned gold yet again after deciding at the last minute to compete in the first marathon of his life. His wife, competing in the javelin toss, added a gold medal to the family collection at the same Olympics. Zátopek’s success was likely due to his grueling training methods. What did he wear while training? More… Discuss