Tag Archives: opus number

Emil Gilels – Schumann – Symphonic Etudes, Op 13: Great compositions/performances


Emil Gilels – Schumann – Symphonic Etudes, Op 13

Beethoven – String Quartet Op.59, No.2 “Rasumovsky” – Végh Quartet – 1952: great compositions/performances


Beethoven – String Quartet Op.59, No.2 “Rasumovsky” – Végh Quartet – 1952

historic musical moments: Beethoven – String Quartet No.6 in B flat major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952


[youtube.com/watch?v=2h7jnUhmlhs]

Beethoven – String Quartet No.6 in B flat major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952

Ludwig van Beethoven: The Early String Quartets, Opus 18
String Quartet No. 6 in B flat major, Op. 18, No. 6
(Streichquartett Nr. 6 in B-dur, Op. 18, Nr. 6)

I. Allegro con brio
II. Adagio ma non troppo
III. Scherzo. Allegro
IV. La Malinconia. Adagio – Allegretto quasi Allegro

Végh Quartet
Sándor Végh, 1st violin
Sándor Zöldy, 2nd violin
Georges Janzer, viola
Paul Szabo, violoncello

The 1952 Haydn Society Recordings

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Beethoven – String Quartet No.6 in B flat major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952


[youtube.com/watch?v=2h7jnUhmlhs]

Beethoven – String Quartet No.6 in B flat major, Op.18:
Végh Quartet – 1952

Ludwig van Beethoven: The Early String Quartets, Opus 18
String Quartet No. 6 in B flat major, Op. 18, No. 6
(Streichquartett Nr. 6 in B-dur, Op. 18, Nr. 6)

I. Allegro con brio
II. Adagio ma non troppo
III. Scherzo. Allegro
IV. La Malinconia. Adagio – Allegretto quasi Allegro

Végh Quartet
Sándor Végh, 1st violin
Sándor Zöldy, 2nd violin
Georges Janzer, viola
Paul Szabo, violoncello

(The 1952 Haydn Society Recordings)

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Ludwig van Beethoven‘s String Quartet No. 6 in B major was published in 1801 as opus 18, no. 6, and was written between 1798 and 1800.

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Beethoven – String Quartet No.2 in G major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952


[youtube.com/watch?v=-mqXXWJ5RpA]

Beethoven – String Quartet No.2 in G major, Op.18 – Végh Quartet – 1952

Ludwig van Beethoven: The Early String Quartets, Opus 18
String Quartet No. 2 in G major, Op. 18, No. 2
(Streichquartett Nr. 2 in G-dur, Op. 18, Nr. 2)

I. Allegro
II. Adagio cantabile — Allegro — Tempo I
III. Scherzo. Allegro
IV. Allegro molto, quasi presto

Végh Quartet
Sándor Végh, 1st violin
Sándor Zöldy, 2nd violin
Georges Janzer, viola
Paul Szabo, violoncello

The 1952 Haydn Society Recordings

 

The String Quartet No. 2 in G major, op. 18, No. 2, was written by Ludwig van Beethoven between 1798 and 1800 and published in 1801.

Of the Op. 18 string quartets, this one is the most grounded in 18th-century musical tradition.[1] According to Steinberg, “In German-speaking countries, the graceful curve of the first violin’s opening phrase has earned the work the nickname of Komplimentier-Quartett, which might be translated as ‘quartet of bows and curtseys’.”[2]

The nickname may have originated from one of Haydn’s last string quartets written about the same time (Op. 77, No. 1; 1799), which was also known as the Komplimentier-Quartett. Haydn was Beethoven’s teacher at the time, and there are similarities in style between the two quartets. They are also both in the key of G major.[3]

After he finished the quartet, Beethoven was not satisfied with the second movement and wrote a replacement. Sketches of the original slow movement survive and a complete version has been reconstructed by musicologist Barry Cooper.[4] It was performed publicly, possibly for the first time, by the Quatuor Danel in the Cosmo Rodewald Concert Hall at the Martin Harris Centre, University of Manchester, on 30 September 2011.

 

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JOHANNES BRAHMS – 7 WALTZES OP. 39: JOHANNES BRAHMS – 7 WALTZES OP. 39 Performed by Dinu Lipatti, Nadia Boulanger



JOHANNES BRAHMS – 7 WALTZES OP. 39
Performed by Dinu Lipatti, Nadia Boulanger

1. Waltz for Four Hands in C-Sharp Major, No. 6, Op. 39 00:00
2. Waltz for Four Hands in A-Flat Major, No. 15, Op. 39 00:58
3. Waltz for Four Hands in E Major, No. 2, Op. 39 2:04
4. Waltz for Four Hands in B Major, No. 1, Op. 39 3:19
5. Waltz for Four Hands in G-Sharp Minor, No. 14, Op. 39 4:07
6. Waltz for Four Hands in G Major, No. 10, Op. 39 5:15
7. Waltz for Four Hands in E Major, No. 5, Op. 39 5:47

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Great Compositions/Performances: JOHN FIELD: Piano Concerto no. 2 – Paolo Restani, piano



I Allegro moderato
II Poco adagio
III Moderato innocente
Paolo Restani, piano
Orchestre Philharmonique de Nice
Marco Guidarini, conductor

 

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Make music Part of Your Life Series: Pietro A. Locatelli Concerto Grosso Op.1 No.7 in F major


[youtube.com/watch?v=surmaII20dU]

Published on Mar 10, 2014
Pietro A. Locatelli Concerto Grosso Op.1 No.7 in F major

Capella Istropolitana
Jaroslav Krecek Conductor

Painting: Mario Nuzzi, La Primave 

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Great Compositions/Performances: George Enescu – Romanian Rhapsody n° 2 in D major, Op. 11 (Orchestre de Montbéliard, Paul Staïcu)



The first Romanian Rhapsody composed at 19 years (together with a second one, both bearing the opus number 11) gained a worldwide fame for its lovely folk tunes (in fact, all Enescu’s works are imbued with such folk lightmotifs) and vivid Romanian rhythms, becoming definitely the best known of all his compositions. Here the Rhapsody No.2 is performed with an infectious empathy by the Romanian conductor Paul Staïcu along with his outstanding musicians of Montbéliard Philharmonic Orchestra.  The performance reveals a mighty symphonist with a keen sense of colours and orchestral textures, a rigorous and honest one devoted to principles and truth, extracting the sap of his composition from folk melodies of his people.  The reputed conductor Paul Staïcu has signed a series of recordings devoted to the complete orchestral oeuvres of his fellow compatriot.  The celebrated Romanian Rhapsody in D major op.11 , more reflexive than its pair no.1, the second Romanian Rhapsody is also a youthful work (written in 1900, when the composer was 19) with persistent folk aromas and picturesque suggestions, aiming at fructifying the popular Romanian musical treasure and meditative side of its sentimentality. The rhapsodic character compounds its appeal and favours its reception by audiences. It is a composition putting grave questions and depicting outrageous realities, filtered through a sensitive conscience. It conveys the sufferance of a moral man facing the immorality of a corrupt and pointless world, reflecting on duties and faiths, on life’s sense and destiny. The torturing mood is magisterially recreated by the inspired baton of Paul Staïcu, the main themes flow unceasingly with a desolating vigour and reach finally a concluding climax affirming an undefeated hope in the majesty of mankind.

  

The Romanian Athenaeum, at about the time of the Rhapsodies’ premiere there in 1903

The two Romanian Rhapsodies, Op. 11, for orchestra, are George Enescu‘s best-known compositions. They were both written in 1901, and first performed together in 1903. The two rhapsodies, and particularly the first, have long held a permanent place in the repertory of every major orchestra. They employ elements of lăutărească music, vivid Romanian rhythms, and an air of spontaneity. They exhibit exotic modal coloring, with some scales having ‘mobile’ thirds, sixths or sevenths, creating a shifting major/minor atmosphere, one of the characteristics of Romanian lăutărească music.[1][not in citation given] They also incorporate some material found in the later drafts of his Poème roumaine, Op. 1.[2]

File:Ateneul Român stage.jpg

The stage of the Athenaeum in Bucharest

The two Romanian Rhapsodies were composed in Paris, and premiered together in a concert at the Romanian Athenaeumin Bucharest which also included the world premiere of Enescu’s First Suite for Orchestra, Op. 9 (1903). The composer conducted all three of his own works, which were preceded on the programme by Berlioz’s Overture to Les francs-jugesand Schumann’s Symphony No. 1, both conducted by Eduard Wachmann. The concert took place on 23 February 1903[3](according to the Julian calendar in use in Romania at that time; 8 March 1903 Gregorian).[4] The Second Rhapsody was played first, and Enescu maintained this order of performance throughout his life.[5]

Rhapsody No. 2 in D major

The Second Rhapsody, like the first, was completed in 1901,[14][7] but is more inward and reflective. Its essential character is not dance, but song.[15][5] It is based on the popular 19th-century ballad “Pe o stîncă neagră, într-un vechi castel” (“On a dark rock, in an old castle”) which, like the opening melody of the First Rhapsody Enescu may have learned from the lăutar Chioru,[1] though again there is some doubt whether Enescu actually remembered it from Chioru.[10] After a development culminating in a canonic presentation, this theme is joined by a dance tune, “Sîrba lui Pompieru” (“Sîrba of the Fireman”), followed shortly afterward by the second half of a folksong, “Văleu, lupu mă mănîncă” (“Aiee, I’m being devoured by a wolf!”), which is treated in canon.[16] Toward the end there is a brief moment of animation, bringing to mind the spirit of country lăutari, but the work ends quietly.[17]

Unlike the First Rhapsody, there is no controversy at all about the scoring of the Second, which is given in the published score as: 3 flutes, 2 oboes, cor anglais, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets in C, 3 trombones, 2 timpani, cymbal, 2 harps, first violins, second violins, violas, cellos, and double basses.[18]

 

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Antonín Dvořák – Carnival Overture, Op. 92 Janácek Philharmonic Orchestra, Theodore Kuchar



This is the “Life” part of the “Nature, Life and Love” trilogy. Performed by SYO Philharmonic led by acclaimed conductor, composer and educator Brian Buggy OAMhttp://syo.com.au

The Carnival Overture, Opus. 92, B. 169, was written by Antonin Dvořák in 1892. It is part of a “Nature, Life and Love” trilogy of overtures written by Dvořák, forming the second “Life” part. The other two parts of the trilogy are overture in a trilogy of overtures that included In Nature’s Realm, Op. 91 (“Nature”) and Othello, Op. 93 (“Love”).

The overture is scored for two flutes, piccolo, two oboes, english horn, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, tuba,timpani, triangle, cymbals, tambourine, harp and strings.

 

Gabriel FAURE’: Pavane, Op. 50 – Paintings By “CLAUDE MONET”



Passing Through: http://www.youtube.com/user/PassingTh… – Friends, Please visit my Poet friend “Passing Through’s” YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/PassingTh… , and support him – Thanks 🙂 

The Pavane in F-sharp minor, opus number 50, was a composition for orchestra and optional chorus written by the French composer Gabriel Fauré in 1887.

Friday Night at the Concert: Dvorak: String Quartet No. 13 in G major (Prague String Quartet)


1. Allegro moderato (0:07)
2. Adagio ma non troppo (9:26)
3. Molto vivace (20:25)
4. Finale (26:59)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 

Antonín Dvořák composed his String Quartet No. 13 in G majorOp. 106, (B. 192), between November and December 9, 1895. 1895 was an eventful year for him: he returned to Europe from America and his sister-in-law and first love both died. Upon finishing the String Quartet No. 13 in G major, he took back up his fourteenth in A-flat major, which he had begun before this quartet and finished it on December 30 of that year. The fourteenth quartet was published with the opus number 105.

The string quartet contains four movements and lasts around 35 minutes. The movements are as follows:

  • Allegro moderato in G major and 2/4 time
  • Adagio ma non troppo in E-flat major and 3/8 time
  • Molto vivace in B minor and 3/4 time, more like a rondo with episodes in A flat major and D major for trios than a typical scherzo, as is more often found in this place in a string quartet in the Romantic music era.
  • Finale. Andante sostenuto – Allegro con fuoco The brief Andante sostenuto is in 4/4 “common” time, introduces a finale in 2/4 time, and interrupts it toward the end of the work. The finale is in the work’s main key of G major.

Rage over a lost penny op. 129 – beethoven ( Anatol Ugorski)



 Anatol Ugorski plays Beethoven: Rage over the lost penny
Exerpts from Wikipedia:  

“The Rondo alla ingharese quasi un capriccio in G major, Op. 129, is a piano rondo by Ludwig van Beethoven.[1] It is better known by the title Rage Over a Lost Penny, Vented in a Caprice(from German: Die Wut über den verlorenen Groschen, ausgetobt in einer Caprice). This title appears on the autograph manuscript, but not in Beethoven’s hand, and has been attributed to his friend Anton Schindler. It is a favourite with audiences and is frequently performed as a show piece.

Despite the late opus number, the work is now dated between 1795 and 1798.  Beethoven left the piece unpublished and incomplete; it was published in 1828 by Anton Diabelli, who obscured the fact that it had been left unfinished. The performance time runs between five and six minutes; the tempo of the piece is Allegro vivace (quarter note = 132–160).

The indication alla ingharese is of interest, as no such word as “ingharese” exists in standard Italian. To people of Beethoven’s day, “gypsy music” and “Hungarian music” were synonymous terms. Beethoven seems to have conflated alla zingarese (in the gypsy style) and all’ongarese (in the Hungarian style) to come up with a unique term alla ingharese.

Robert Schumann wrote of the work that “it would be difficult to find anything merrier than this whim… It is the most amiable, harmless anger, similar to that felt when one cannot pull a shoe from off the foot”, citing the work as an instance of Beethoven’s earthliness against those fixated upon a transcendental image of the composer.”