Tag Archives: Order of Saint Benedict

Saint of the Day for Tuesday, February 10th, 2015 : St. Scholastica


Image of St. Scholastica

St. Scholastica

St. Scholastica, sister of St. Benedict, consecrated her life to God from her earliest youth. After her brother went to Monte Cassino, where he established his famous monastery, she took up her abode … continue reading

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Saint of the Day for Tuesday, February 10th, 2015: St. Scholastica


Image of St. Scholastica

St. Scholastica

St. Scholastica, sister of St. Benedict, consecrated her life to God from her earliest youth. After her brother went to Monte Cassino, where he established his famous monastery, she took up her abode … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

Saint of the Day for Saturday, December 20th, 2014: St. Dominic of Silos


Image of St. Dominic of Silos

St. Dominic of Silos

Benedictine abbot and defender of the faith. Born in Canas, Navarre, Spain, circa 1000, he entered the Benedictines at San Millan de Ia Cogolla. King Garcia III of Navarre challenged him when he … continue reading

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Saint of the Day for Tuesday, December 16th, 2014: St. Ado of Vienne


Image of St. Ado of Vienne

St. Ado of Vienne

An archbishop and scholar, Ado was born in Sens and educated at the Benedictine abbey of Ferrieres. Abbot Lupus Servatus, an outstanding humanist of the time, trained Ado, and was impressed with the … continue reading

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TODAY’S SAINT: St. John Theristus


Image of St. John TheristusSt. John Theristus

Benedictine monk, called Theristus or “Harvester.” He was of Calabrian lineage, born in Sicily. His mother was a slave of the Saracens. John escaped at a young age and became a monk. continue reading

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TODAY’S SAINT: St. Scholastica


St. Scholastica

St. Scholastica

Feastday: February 10
Died: 543
St. Scholastica, sister of St. Benedict, consecrated her life to Godfrom her earliest youth. After her brother went to Monte Cassino, where he established his famous monastery, she took up her abode in the neighborhood at Plombariola, where she founded and governed a monastery of nuns, about five miles from that of St. Benedict, who, it appears, also directed his sister and her nuns. She visited her brother once a year, and as she was not allowed to enter his monastery, he went in company with some of his brethren to meet her at a house some distance away. These visits were spent in conferring together on spiritual matters. On one occasion they had passed the time as usual in prayer and pious conversation and in the evening they sat down to take their reflection. St. Scholasticabegged her brother to remain until the next day. St. Benedictrefused to spend the night outside his monastery. She had recourse to prayer and a furious thunderstorm burst so that neither St. Benedict nor any of his companions could return home. They spent the night in spiritual conferences. The next morning they parted to meet no more on earth. Three days later St. Scholasticadied, and her holy brother beheld her soul in a vision as it ascended into heaven. He sent his brethren to bring her body to his monastery and laid it in the tomb he had prepared for himself. She died about the year 543, and St. Benedict followed her soon after. Her feast day is February 10th.

 

from Wikipedia

Scholastica (c. 480 – 10 February 542) is a saint of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Churches. Born in Italy, she was the twin sister of Benedict of Nursia.[2]

St. Gregory the Great, in his Dialogues, tells us that she was a nunand leader of a community for women at Plombariola, about five miles from Benedict’s abbey at Monte Cassino. We do not know what rule this community followed, although it seems most likely it was the Rule of St. Benedict.

Scholastica was dedicated to God from a young age (some tellings of her story indicate that she preceded Benedict in godliness, and he came to holiness after she did). The most commonly told story about her is that she would, once a year, go and visit her brother at a place near his abbey, and they would spend the day worshiping together and discussing sacred texts and issues. She also is the founder of women’s branch of Benedictine Monasticism.

Austrian €50 coin of 2002

One day they had supper and continued their conversation. When Benedict indicated it was time for him to leave, she protested, and begged him to stay with her for the evening so they could continue their discussions. He refused, insisting that he needed to return to his cell. At that point, Scholastica closed her hands in prayer, and after a moment, a wild storm started outside of the guest house in which they were housed. Benedict asked, “What have you done?”, to which she replied, “I asked you and you would not listen; so I asked my God and he did listen. So now go off, if you can, leave me and return to your monastery.” Benedict was unable to return to his monastery, and they spent the night in discussion. According to Gregory’s Dialogues, three days later, from his cell, he saw his sister’s soul leaving the earth and ascending to heaven in the form of a shining white dove.

Her memorial is 10 February. Scholastica is the patron saint of nuns, convulsive children, and is invoked against storms and rain.

She was recently selected as the main motif for a high value commemorative coin: the Austria €50 ‘The Christian Religious Orders’, issued 13 March 2002. On the obverse (heads) side of the coin Scholastica is depicted alongside Benedict.

 

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Article: THE LLIBRE VERMELL DE MONTSERRAT


The Llibre Vermell de Montserrat

On a narrow terrace more than halfway up the precipitous cliffs of Montserrat in Spain is a Benedictine monastery that houses a library. Perhaps its most precious item is the Llibre Vermell de Montserrat, or Red Book of Montserrat, a manuscript containing devotional songs by unknown composers. Filled with songs for pilgrims, the manuscript was completed around 1399 and once contained 172 double pages, but more than 30 have been lost. Why does the manuscript have “red” in the title?More…