Tag Archives: pablo de sarasate

Historic Musical Bits: Isaac Stern – Edouard Lalo – Symphonie Espagnole, Op.21


Édouard Lalo

Édouard Lalo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Isaac Stern – Edouard Lalo – Symphonie Espagnole, Op.21

Published on Oct 24, 2012

Eugene Ormandy conducting Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra
I. Allegro non troppo
II. Scherzando
III. Intermezzo
IV. Andante
V. Rondo

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The Symphonie espagnole in D minor, Op. 21, is a work for violin and orchestra by Édouard Lalo.

History

The work was written in 1874 for violinist Pablo de Sarasate, and premiered in Paris in February 1875.

Although called a “Spanish Symphony” (see also Sinfonia concertante), it is considered a violin concerto by musicians today. The piece has Spanish motifs throughout, and launched a period when Spanish-themed music came into vogue. (Georges Bizet‘s opera Carmen premiered a month after the Symphonie espagnole.)

The Symphonie espagnole is one of Lalo’s two most often played works, the other being his Cello Concerto. His “official” Violin Concerto in F, and his Symphony in G minor, written thirteen years later, are neither performed nor recorded as often.[citation needed]

Structure

  1. Allegro non troppo
  2. Scherzando: Allegro molto
  3. Intermezzo: Allegro non troppo
  4. Andante
  5. Rondo: Allegro

A typical performance runs just over one-half hour. One of the shorter recordings, conductor Eugene Ormandy’s 1967 recording with the Philadelphia Orchestra, featuring violinist Isaac Stern, runs 32 minutes and 43 seconds.[1]

Influence on Tchaikovsky

The Symphonie espagnole had some influence on the genesis of Tchaikovsky‘s Violin Concerto in D major. In March 1878, Tchaikovsky was staying at Nadezhda von Meck‘s estate at Clarens, Switzerland, while recovering from the breakdown of his disastrous marriage and his subsequent suicide attempt. His favourite pupil (and possibly his lover), the violinist Iosif Kotek, shortly arrived from Berlin with a lot of new music for violin. These included the Symphonie espagnole, which he and Tchaikovsky played through to great delight. This gave Tchaikovsky the idea of writing a violin concerto, and he immediately set aside his current work on a piano sonata and started on the concerto on 17 March.[2] With Kotek’s technical help, the concerto was finished by 11 April.

References

 

 

 

Historic Musical Bits: Wieniawski – Violin Concerto No. 2 in d minor op. 22 Isaac Stern and Philadelphia Orchestra-Eugene Ormandy: conductor-1957


Isaak Stern plays Wieniawski-Violin Concerto No. 2 in d minor op. 22 

Itzhak Perlman – Pablo de Sarasate, Zigeunerweisen Op.20: great compositions/performances


Itzhak Perlman – Pablo de Sarasate, Zigeunerweisen Op.20

Itzhak Perlman

Cover of Itzhak Perlman

Itzhak Perlman – Pablo de Sarasate, Zigeunerweisen Op.20: great compositions/performances


Itzhak Perlman – Pablo de Sarasate, Zigeunerweisen Op.20

Itzhak Perlman Violine
Pablo de Sarasate, Zigeunerweisen Op.20

great compositions/performances: Isaac Stern – Edouard Lalo – Symphonie Espagnole, Op.21


[youtube.com/watch?v=p-C5ujRHpZw]

Isaac Stern – Edouard Lalo – Symphonie Espagnole, Op.21

Eugene Ormandy conducting Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra
I. Allegro non troppo
II. Scherzando
III. Intermezzo
IV. Andante
V. Rondo

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Carmen Fantasy, Op 25 by Pablo De Sarasate



Carmen Fantasy, Op 25 by Pablo De Sarasate
Performed by the Palos Verdes Regional Symphony Orchestra at the James Armstrong theater in Torrance CA on April 21st, 2012
Elmer Su conducting, Shannon Zhuang soloist
Sorry for the shutter noise on this recording the photographer for the Orchestra was very close to the Camera and very active during Ms. Zhuang’s performance. Love her photos. Wish she had a quieter camera.

 

“Chorale “Jesu Bleibet meine Freude” (from Cantata 147, BWV 147) (arr. Hess)


Find out more about Dinu Lipatti      here

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Dinu Lipatti

Dinu Lipatti
Background information
Born 19 March 1917
BucharestRomania Romania
Died 2 December 1950 (aged 33)
GenevaSwitzerland Switzerland
Genres Classical Music
Occupations PianistComposer
Labels EMI
Associated acts Member of the Romanian Academy
Notable instruments
piano

Dinu Lipatti (Romanian pronunciation: [ˈdinu liˈpati]; 1 April [O.S. 19 March] 1917 – 2 December 1950) was a Romanian classical pianist and composerwhose career was cut short by his death from Hodgkin’s disease at age 33. He was elected posthumously to the Romanian Academy.

Lipatti was born in Bucharest into a musical family: his father was a violinist who had studied with Pablo de Sarasate and Carl Flesch,[1] his mother a pianist. For his baptism, which occurred not shortly after birth as is usual, but when he was old enough to play the piano, the violinist and composer George Enescu agreed to be his godfather. Lipatti played a minuet by Mozart at his own baptism.[1] He studied at the Gheorghe Lazăr High School, while undergoing piano and composition studies with Mihail Jora for three years. He then attended the Bucharest Conservatoire, studying under Florica Musicescu, who also taught him privately.[1] In June 1930, the best pupils at the Conservatoire gave a concert at the Bucharest Opera, and the 13-year old Lipatti received a huge ovation for his performance of the Grieg Piano Concerto in A minor.[1] In 1932 he won prizes for his compositions: a Piano Sonatina, and a Sonatina for Violin and Piano. That year he also won a Grand Prize for his symphonic suite Les Tziganes.[1] 
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H. Wieniawski – Violin Concerto No. 2 in D minor, Op. 22 (Kobayashi)


Henryk Wieniawski (1835-1880)

Concerto for Violin and Orchestra No. 2 in D minor, Op. 22

Miki Kobayashi, violin
Orkiestra Kameralna Polskiego Radia Amadeus
Agnieszka Duczmal, conductor

Recorded at Auditorium Uniwersytet im. Adama Mickiewicza, Poznan, 2011

 
 

Violin Concerto No. 2 in D minor, Op. 22, by the Polish violin virtuosoHenryk Wieniawski, may have been started in 1856, but the first performance did not take place until November 27, 1862, when he played it in St. Petersburg with Anton Rubinstein conducting. It was published in 1879, inscribed to his dear friend Pablo de Sarasate. The work is in three movements:

  1. Allegro moderato in D minor
  2. Romance: Andante non troppo in B flat major
  3. Allegro con fuoco – Allegro moderato (à la Zingara) in D minor/D major

Both main elements of the first movement, its sombre, restless first subject, and its lyrical pendant (begun by a solo horn) are discussed freely and subject to dazzling embellishments by the solo violin. This movement includes a demanding variety of technique, including chromatic glissandi, double stops, arpeggios, sixths, octaves, thirds, chromatic scales, and artificial harmonics, not to mention a myriad of bowing techniques. The beat is based on a 4/4 or common time.

The slow movement, a Romance, follows without a break. It is based on a lilting tune in 12/8 time and rises to an impassioned central climax.

A rhapsodic passage marked Allegro con fuoco and mainly a solo cadenza, leads to the finale, a dashing rondo in the gypsy style, which quotes the first movement’s subsidiary theme in the course of its second and third episodes. The final movement implements a 2/4 time, which allows the violinists to emphasize certain notes in the beginning of some measures.

Wieniawski’s second Violin Concerto remains one of the greatest violin concertos of the Romantic era, memorable for its lush and moving melodies and harmonies.        More…

Today’s Birthday: PABLO MARTÍN MELITÓN DE SARASATE Y NAVASCUÉS (1844) – Nathan Milstein plays Sarasate Tarantella


 

Pablo Martín Melitón de Sarasate y Navascués (1844)

Sarasate was a Spanish violinist and composer. He began studying 

English: Spanish violinist and composer Pablo ...

Image via Wikipedia

the violin with his bandmaster father at age five, and at his first public concert at age eight, he impressed a wealthy patron and was sent to study in Madrid. There, Queen Isabel II gave him the Stradivarius violin that he would play for the rest of his life. He made his Paris debut in 1860 and commenced touring the world. He wrote scores of brilliant virtuoso works, some of which are still played today. Where are his violins now? More…Discuss

Pablo Sarasate