Tag Archives: Pacific Ocean

today’s holiday: Tonga Emancipation Day June 4


Tonga Emancipation Day

June 4 is a national holiday in the Kingdom of Tonga, celebrating its full independence from Britain. On June 4, 1863, King George Tupuo I abolished the system of serfdom in the island nation of Tonga. The historic occasion is remembered on Emancipation Day, which is celebrated just after the conclusion of the annual three-day Ha’apai Festival. The Ha’apai Festival begins on Tonga’s outer islands and ends on Lifuka Island on June 4th. Both the festival and Emancipation Day are marked with feasts and dancing. More… Discuss

Skylab Is Launched (1973)


Skylab Is Launched (1973)

Launched into orbit in 1973, Skylab was the first US space station. It carried a laboratory for studying the human body’s adaptation to weightlessness and a powerful solar telescope. Three successive astronaut crews conducted research aboard Skylab for a total of 171 days in 1973–74. Though Skylab was intended to be reused, increased solar activity caused its orbit to degrade faster than expected. In 1979, the 75-tonne station reentered Earth’s atmosphere and broke up. Where did the debris land? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Nauru Independence Day (2015)


Nauru Independence Day (2015)

This island in the Pacific Ocean gained independence from Great Britain on January 31, 1968. It had been governed by Australia. Independence Day is a national holiday in Nauru. More… Discuss

Environment: Plastics Pervade Planet’s Oceans


Plastics Pervade Planet’s Oceans

The world’s oceans are clogged with 269,000 tons of plastic objects, according to a new report by a group of marine researchers. The estimate is based on data from 24 expeditions over six years, during which they studied gyres—regions with extremely strong currents—in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Oceans. When a large plastic object is introduced into the ocean, it often gets sucked into the whirling currents of a gyre. These objects are then eroded into “microplastics.” According to the researchers, these particles account for more than 90 percent of the plastic in the ocean. More… Discuss

Black Seadevil Caught on Video for the First Time (“Down here don’t be afraid of the dark: Be afraid of the light!”, by National Geographic)


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Black Seadevil Caught on Video for the First Time

The Humpback anglerfish uses a modified dorsal...

The Humpback anglerfish uses a modified dorsal spine as a bioluminescent ‘fishing rod’ to capture prey. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A female Black Seadevil has been captured on video in what researchers say are the first images of their kind. The grotesque creature, a type of anglerfish, was recorded off the coast of California at a depth of approximately 1,900 feet (579 m) by a remotely operated vehicle controlled by scientists at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. The elusive fish—known for using a “lure” suspended over its mouth to attract prey—was spotted during a midwater transect, an exercise intended to catalog all species encountered at a particular depth. More… Discuss

World’s Weirdest – Weird Killer of the Deep (In California we have it all!)

this pressed for your informantion: Earthquake hits northern Japan, no tsunami warning issued


Earthquake hits northern Japan, no tsunami warning issued.

this day in the yesteryear: The Suez Canal Opens (1869)


The Suez Canal Opens (1869)

One of the world’s most heavily used shipping lanes, the Suez Canal extends 101 miles (163 km) from Port Said to the Gulf of Suez and connects the Red Sea with the Mediterranean Sea, allowing ships to sail directly between the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean. After its completion in 1869, its ownership remained in French and British hands until Egypt nationalized it in 1956, setting off an international crisis, during which it was closed. What caused the next closure of the canal? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Tuvalu Independence Day


Tuvalu Independence Day

Independence Day is the only national celebration in Tuvalu, which consists of nine islands in the South Pacific with a total surface area of 10 square miles. The day is marked in the capital city of Funafuti with an official government flag-raising ceremony followed by a parade of policemen and schoolchildren; similar events are held in smaller communities throughout the country. Also held in addition to several days of feasting and dance is the Independence Day Sports Festival, in which citizens enjoy a number of sporting competitions. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Vasco Núñez de Balboa Reaches Pacific Ocean (1513)


Vasco Núñez de Balboa Reaches Pacific Ocean (1513)

Balboa was a Spanish conquistador who, while fleeing creditors, hid on a vessel and wound up in Panama. Once there, he founded the Panamanian colony of Darién, the first stable settlement on the South American continent, and won the friendship of the indigenous people—which was unusual given the cruelty of most conquistadors. Balboa then crossed the Isthmus of Panama and reached the Pacific Ocean, claiming it and all shores washed by it for the Spanish crown. What did he call this ocean? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Ferdinand Magellan Sets Sail to Circumnavigate Globe (1519)


Ferdinand Magellan Sets Sail to Circumnavigate Globe (1519)

In 1518, Spanish king Charles I approved navigator Ferdinand Magellan’s plan to sail to the Spice Islands by a western route. On the way, Magellan crossed the “Sea of the South” and renamed it the Pacific Ocean because of the calm crossing. His ambitious voyage proved definitively the roundness of the Earth and revealed the Americas as a new world, separate from Asia. Though Magellan is often credited with being the first to circumnavigate the globe, he never actually returned to Europe. Why? More… Discuss

Wikipedia:Today’s featured article/April 21, 2014


Wikipedia:Today’s featured article/April 21, 2014

 
Hurricane Kiko

Hurricane Kiko was one of the strongest tropical cyclones to ever make landfall on the eastern coast of the Baja California Peninsula. The eleventh named storm of the 1989 Pacific hurricane season, Kiko formed out of a large mesoscale convective system on August 25. Slowly tracking northwestward, the storm rapidly intensified into a hurricane early the next day. Strengthening continued until early August 27, when Kiko reached its peak intensity with winds of 120 mph (195 km/h). The storm turned west at this time, and at around 0600 UTC, the storm made landfall near Punta Arena on the southern tip of Baja California. The hurricane rapidly weakened into a tropical storm later that day and further into a tropical depression by August 28, shortly after entering the Pacific Ocean. The depression persisted for another day while tracking southward, before being absorbed by nearby Tropical Storm Lorena. Though Kiko made landfall as a Category 3 hurricane, its impact was relatively minor. Press reports indicated that 20 homes were destroyed and numerous highways were flooded by torrential rains. (Full article…)

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NEWS: WE NEED TO CLEAR THE AIR


We Need to Clear the Air

Pollution is going to be the death of us. According to World Health Organization estimates, air pollution contributed to the deaths of seven million people in 2012, making it the world’s greatest environmental health risk. The deaths were concentrated most heavily in low- and middle-income countries, primarily in Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific region. Indoor air pollution appears to be a greater threat than outdoor air pollution, contributing to 3.3 million deaths in 2012 compared to 2.6 million for the latter. More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: FERDINAND MAGELLAN REACHES THE PHILIPPINES (1521)


Ferdinand Magellan Reaches the Philippines (1521)

Portuguese navigator Ferdinand Magellan set sail from Spain on September 20, 1519, with five vessels and about 265 men. Sighting the South American coast near Pernambuco, he searched for a suspected passage to the South Sea and ultimately discovered the strait that bears his name. On March 6, 1521, Magellan reached the Marianas and 10 days later the Philippines, where he was killed in a battle with the natives. How many of Magellan’s original crew members returned to Spain alive in 1522? More… Discuss

 

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Latest Country Visit at euzicasa (198 total): VANUATU – 1 VISITOR FROM HERE!


VANUATU POPULATION: 261,565

1 VISITOR FROM HERE!

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 Background
Multiple waves of colonizers, each speaking a distinct language, migrated to the New Hebrides in the millennia preceding European exploration in the 18th century. This settlement pattern accounts for the complex linguistic diversity found on the archipelago to this day. The British and French, who settled the New Hebrides in the 19th century, agreed in 1906 to an Anglo-French Condominium, which administered the islands until independence in 1980, when the new name of Vanuatu was adopted.
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 Geography
A Y-shaped chain of four main islands and 80 smaller islands; several of the islands have active volcanoes and there are several underwater volcanoes as well
Location: Oceania, group of islands in the South Pacific Ocean, about three-quarters of the way from Hawaii to Australia
Geographic coordinates: 16 00 S, 167 00 E
Area: total: 12,189 sq km land: 12,189 sq km water: 0 sq km note: includes more than 80 islands, about 65 of which are inhabited

Size comparison: slightly larger than Connecticut

Land Boundaries: 0 km
Coastline: 2,528 km
Maritime claims: measured from claimed archipelagic baselines territorial sea: 12 nm contiguous zone: 24 nm exclusive economic zone: 200 nm continental shelf: 200 nm or to the edge of the continental margin
Climate: tropical; moderated by southeast trade winds from May to October; moderate rainfall from November to April; may be affected by cyclones from December to April
Terrain: mostly mountainous islands of volcanic origin; narrow coastal plains
Elevation extremes: lowest point: Pacific Ocean 0 m highest point: Tabwemasana 1,877 m
Natural resources: manganese, hardwood forests, fish
Land use: arable land: 1.64% permanent crops: 10.25% other: 88.11% (2011)
Irrigated land: NA
Natural hazards: tropical cyclones or typhoons (January to April); volcanic eruption on Aoba (Ambae) island began on 27 November 2005, volcanism also causes minor earthquakes; tsunamis volcanism: significant volcanic activity with multiple eruptions in recent years; Yasur (elev. 361 m), one of the world’s most active volcanoes, has experienced continuous activity in recent centuries; other historically active volcanoes include, Aoba, Ambrym, Epi, Gaua, Kuwae, Lopevi, Suretamatai, and Traitor’s Head
Current Environment Issues: most of the population does not have access to a reliable supply of potable water; deforestation
International Environment Agreements: party to: Antarctic-Marine Living Resources, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Change-Kyoto Protocol, Desertification, Endangered Species, Law of the Sea, Marine Dumping, Ozone Layer Protection, Ship Pollution, Tropical Timber 94 signed, but not ratified: none of the selected agreements
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 People
Nationality: noun: Ni-Vanuatu (singular and plural) adjective: Ni-Vanuatu
Ethnic groups: Ni-Vanuatu 98.5%, other 1.5% (1999 Census)
Languages: local languages (more than 100) 72.6%, pidgin (known as Bislama or Bichelama – official) 23.1%, English (official) 1.9%, French (official) 1.4%, other 0.3%, unspecified 0.7% (1999 Census)
Religions: Protestant 55.6% (Presbyterian 31.4%, Anglican 13.4%, Seventh-Day Adventist 10.8%), Roman Catholic 13.1%, other Christian 13.8%, indigenous beliefs 5.6% (including Jon Frum cargo cult), other 9.6%, none 1%, unspecified 1.3% (1999 Census)
Population: 261,565 (July 2013 est.)
Age structure: 0-14 years: 37.9% (male 50,548/female 48,477) 15-24 years: 19.7% (male 25,685/female 25,900) 25-54 years: 34% (male 43,552/female 45,273) 55-64 years: 4.9% (male 6,493/female 6,289) 65 years and over: 3.6% (male 4,817/female 4,531) (2013 est.)
Dependency ratios: total dependency ratio: 69.5 % youth dependency ratio: 62.8 % elderly dependency ratio: 6.7 % potential support ratio: 15 (2013)
Median age: total: 20.8 years
male: 20.4 years female: 21.1 years (2013 est.)
Population growth rate: 2.06% (2013 est.)
Birth rate: 26.35 births/1,000 population (2013 est.)
Death rate: 4.2 deaths/1,000 population (2013 est.)
Net migration rate: -1.53 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2013 est.)
Urbanization: urban population: 26% of total population (2010) rate of urbanization: 4.2% annual rate of change (2010-15 est.)
Sex ratio: at birth: 1.05 male(s)/female 0-14 years: 1.04 male(s)/female 15-24 years: 1 male(s)/female 25-54 years: 0.96 male(s)/female 55-64 years: 1.04 male(s)/female 65 years and over: 1.07 male(s)/female total population: 1.01 male(s)/female (2013 est.)
Maternal mortality rate: 110 deaths/100,000 live births (2010)
Infant mortality rate: total: 17.15 deaths/1,000 live births
male: 18.34 deaths/1,000 live births female: 15.91 deaths/1,000 live births (2013 est.)
Life expectancy at birth: total population: 72.38 years
male: 70.83 years female: 74 years (2013 est.)
Total fertility rate: 3.47 children born/woman (2013 est.)
Contraceptive prevalence rate: 38.4% (2007)
Health expenditures: 5.3% of GDP (2010)
Physicians density: 0.12 physicians/1,000 population (2008)
Hospital bed density: 1.69 beds/1,000 population (2008)
Drinking water source: improved: urban: 98% of population rural: 87% of population total: 90% of population unimproved: urban: 2% of population rural: 13% of population total: 10% of population (2010 est.)
Sanitation facility access: improved: urban: 64% of population rural: 54% of population total: 57% of population unimproved: urban: 36% of population rural: 46% of population total: 43% of population (2010 est.)
Obesity – adult prevalence rate: 27.5% (2008)
Children under the age of 5 years underweight: 11.7% (2007)
Education expenditures: 5.2% of GDP (2009)
Literacy: definition: age 15 and over can read and write
total population: 83.2% male: NA 84.9% female: NA 81.6% (2011 est.)
School life expectancy (primary to tertiary education): total: 11 years
male: 11 years female: 10 years (2004)
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 Government
Country name: conventional long form: Republic of Vanuatu conventional short form: Vanuatu local long form: Ripablik blong Vanuatu local short form: Vanuatu former: New Hebrides
Government type: parliamentary republic
Capital: name: Port-Vila (on Efate) geographic coordinates: 17 44 S, 168 19 E time difference: UTC+11 (16 hours ahead of Washington, DC during Standard Time)
Administrative divisions: 6 provinces; Malampa, Penama, Sanma, Shefa, Tafea, Torba
Independence: 30 July 1980 (from France and the UK)
National holiday: Independence Day, 30 July (1980)
Constitution: 30 July 1980
Legal system: mixed legal system of English common law, French law, and customary law
Suffrage: 18 years of age; universal
Executive branch: chief of state: President Iolu Johnson ABBIL (since 3 September 2009) head of government: Prime Minister Moana CARCASSES Kalosil (since 23 March 2013) cabinet: Council of Ministers appointed by the prime minister, responsible to parliament (For more information visit the World Leaders website ) elections: president elected for a five-year term by an electoral college consisting of parliament and the presidents of the regional councils; election for president last held on 2 September 2009 (next to be held in 2014); following legislative elections, the leader of the majority party or majority coalition usually elected prime minister by parliament from among its members; election for prime minister last held on 23 March 2013 (next to be held following general elections in 2016) election results: Iolu Johnson ABBIL elected president, with 41 votes out of 58, on the third ballot on 2 September 2009; Moana CARCASSES Kalosil was elected prime minister following the resignation of Sato KILMAN on 21 March 2013
Legislative branch: unicameral Parliament (52 seats; members elected by popular vote to serve four-year terms) elections: last held on 30 October 2012 (next to be held in 2016) election results: percent of vote by party – NA; seats by party – VP 8, PPP 6, UMP 5, GJP 4, NUP 4, IG 3, GC 3, NAG 3, RMC 3, MPP 2, NIPDP 2, PSP 1, VLDP 1, VNP 1, VPDP 1, VRP 1, and independent 4; note – political party associations are fluid note: the National Council of Chiefs advises on matters of culture and language
Judicial branch: highest court(s): Supreme Court (consists of a chief justice and 3 judges); note – appeals from the Supreme Court are considered by the Court of Appeal, constituted by 2 or more judges of the Supreme Court sitting together judge selection and term of office: Supreme Court chief justice appointed by the president after consultation with the prime minister and the leader of the opposition; other judges are appointed by the president on the advice of the Judicial Service Commission, a 4-member advisory body; judges appointed until age of retirement subordinate courts: magistrates’ courts; island courts
Political parties and leaders: Greens Confederation or GC [Moana CARCASSES Kalosil] Iauko Group or IG [NA] Land and Justice Party (Graon mo Jastis Pati) or GJP [Ralph REGENVANU] Melanesian Progressive Party or MPP [Barak SOPE] Nagriamel movement or NAG [NA] Natatok Indigenous People’s Democratic Party or (NATATOK) or NIPDP [Alfred Roland CARLOT] National United Party or NUP [Ham LINI] People’s Progressive Party or PPP [Sato KILMAN] People’s Service Party or PSP [Don KEN] Reunification of Movement for Change or RMC [Charlot SALWAI] Union of Moderate Parties or UMP [Serge VOHOR] Vanua’aku Pati (Our Land Party) or VP [Edward NATAPEI] Vanuatu Democratic Party [Maxime Carlot KORMAN] Vanuatu Liberal Democratic Party or VLDP [Tapangararua WILLIE] Vanuatu National Party or VNP [Issac HAMARILIU] Vanuatu Progressive Development Party or VPDP [Robert Bohn SIKOL] Vanuatu Republican Party or VRP [Marcellino PIPITE]
Political pressure groups and leaders: NA
International organization participation: ACP, ADB, AOSIS, C, FAO, G-77, IBRD, ICAO, ICRM, IDA, IFC, IFRCS, ILO, IMF, IMO, IMSO, IOC, IOM, ITU, ITUC (NGOs), MIGA, NAM, OAS (observer), OIF, OPCW, PIF, Sparteca, SPC, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNIDO, UNWTO, UPU, WCO, WFTU (NGOs), WHO, WIPO, WMO, WTO
National symbol(s): boar’s tusk
National anthem: name: “Yumi, Yumi, Yumi” (We, We, We) lyrics/music: Francois Vincent AYSSAV note: adopted 1980, the anthem is written in Bislama, a Creole language that mixes Pidgin English and French
Diplomatic representation in the US: Vanuatu does not have an embassy in the US; it does, however, have a Permanent Mission to the UN
Diplomatic representation from the US: the US does not have an embassy in Vanuatu; the US ambassador to Papua New Guinea is accredited to Vanuatu
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 Economy
This South Pacific island economy is based primarily on small-scale agriculture, which provides a living for about two-thirds of the population. Fishing, offshore financial services, and tourism, with nearly 197,000 visitors in 2008, are other mainstays of the economy. Mineral deposits are negligible; the country has no known petroleum deposits. A small light industry sector caters to the local market. Tax revenues come mainly from import duties. Economic development is hindered by dependence on relatively few commodity exports, vulnerability to natural disasters, and long distances from main markets and between constituent islands. In response to foreign concerns, the government has promised to tighten regulation of its offshore financial center. In mid-2002, the government stepped up efforts to boost tourism through improved air connections, resort development, and cruise ship facilities. Agriculture, especially livestock farming, is a second target for growth. Australia and New Zealand are the main suppliers of tourists and foreign aid.

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE WAR OF THE PACIFIC BEGINS (1879)


The War of the Pacific Begins (1879)

For much of the 19th century, the mineral-rich Atacama Desert was the object of conflicts between Chile, Bolivia, and Peru. Tensions boiled over in 1879, when a dispute over nitrate fields progressed to all-out war between Chile and a united Bolivia and Peru. Chile defeated both countries and took control of valuable mining areas in each. Bolivia lost its entire Pacific coast and was left landlocked, and Peru foundered economically for decades. What were the long-term effects of this outcome? More… Discuss

 

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Fukushima fallout in US: fishermen detect Cesium-137 in salmon stock – News – World – The Voice of Russia: News, Breaking news, Politics, Economics, Business, Russia, International current events, Expert opinion, podcasts, Video


Fukushima fallout in US: fishermen detect Celsium-137 in salmon stockFukushima fallout in US: fishermen detect Cesium-137 in salmon stock – News – World – The Voice of Russia: News, Breaking news, Politics, Economics, Business, Russia, International current events, Expert opinion, podcasts, Video.

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: 28,800 FLOATING BATH TOYS TOPPLE INTO OCEAN (1992)


28,800 Floating Bath Toys Topple into Ocean (1992)

Children’s bath toys may seem an unlikely source of oceanographic data, but that is just what they have been since 1992, when a shipment of Friendly Floatees from China went rogue while en route to Tacoma, Washington. It all began when 12 shipping containers went overboard during a storm in the Pacific. One broke open, releasing 28,800 toy ducks, beavers, frogs, and turtles into the water. Oceanographer Curtis Ebbesmeyer began tracking their progress after the first Floatees washed ashore where? More… Discuss

 

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National Geographic – Gyre: Creating Art From a Plastic Ocean


Published on Aug 21, 2013

In this full-length web exclusive, National Geographic journeys along the remote Alaskan coast … in search of garbage. A team of scientists and artists investigates the buildup of marine debris washing out of the great gyres, or currents, in the Pacific Ocean. Called the Gyre Expedition, their goal is to create art from the trash they find to raise awareness about its impact on oceans and wildlife. Their artwork will become part of a traveling exhibition in 2014. 

Learn more about the expedition and the next phase of the Gyre Project:
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/gyre

 

Seal Beach San Gabriel Bike Trail – River’s End Cafe – Pacific Ocean


Seal Beach San Gabriel Bike Trail - River's End Cafe - Pacific Ocean

Seal Beach San Gabriel Bike Trail – River’s End Cafe – Pacific Ocean

News: PLASTIC IN PACIFIC INCREASED 100-FOLD


Plastic in Pacific Increased 100-Fold

Over the past 40 years, the quantity of plastic waste floating in thenortheastern Pacific has increased 100-fold, affecting marine life in myriad ways. One issue that has received much attention is the ingestion of tiny, broken down plastic particles by marine organisms. However, researchers also recently uncovered another consequence of the increased presence of plastic—it is making it easier for certain marine insects to reproduce.Halobates sericeus requires a hard surface on which to lay its eggs, and the hundreds of millions of plastic particles now floating in the Pacific Ocean are providing them with ample breeding ground. More… Discuss

Today’s Birthday: Meriwether Lewis (1774)


Meriwether Lewis (1774)

After serving as a captain in the US army, Lewis became secretary to President Thomas Jefferson. When Congress approved a plan to find a land route to the Pacific Ocean, Jefferson selected his trusted associate, along with William Clark, to head the expedition. In 1807, Lewis was made governor of the Louisiana Territory. His sudden death—either by murder or suicide—in 1809, while on his way to Washington, DC, is still the subject of controversy. Why have requests to exhume his body been denied? More… Discuss

Japan Finds Rare Earth Elements in Seabed


Japan Finds Rare Earth Elements in Seabed

Japanese researchers have discovered an estimated 100 billion tons of rare earth minerals in the Pacific Ocean floor. These minerals are a vital component of many hi-tech devices, including hybrid cars, flat-screen TVs, iPods, superconductors, lasers, missiles, night-vision goggles, and wind turbines. Currently, China produces 97 percent of the world’s rare earth metals. In recent years, it has cut export quotas, citing environmental concerns and domestic demand. This has led to accusations of strategic hoarding and price gouging. If recovering the minerals from the seabed proves commercially viable, the deposits could expand the world’s reserves 1,000-fold. More… Discuss