Tag Archives: Patient

Healtth-Ebola: Ebola virus lingers in patient’s eyeball even after recovery| -ABC News


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Health: Hearing Loss Hinders Hospice Care


Hearing Loss Hinders Hospice Care

A new report on end-of-life care reveals that hearing loss is one of the most commonly overlooked medical concerns for hospice patients—and one of the most upsetting, as it can leave patients feeling isolated and alone. Eighty percent of Americans over age 85 having hearing impairments, but many of them do not have hearing aids because the devices can cost up to $3,500 each and are often not covered by health plans. Experts urge physicians and caregivers with hearing impaired patients to use small amplifying devices or work with charities that loan out hearing aids. More… Discuss

Hospital Garb Could Be Your Own


Hospital Garb Could Be Your Own

Traditional hospital gowns have been the butt of many a joke, but for those who have to don them, they are no laughing matter. Being hospitalized can rob a person of much of his dignity, and while aspects of this are unavoidable, hospital apparel does not have to be one of them. In many cases, researchers say, it is clinically reasonable for patients to wear their own clothing, or at least pants underneath their open-backed gowns, but few take advantage of this because most are unaware that it is an option. More… Discuss

Video Calls Benefit Some Hospitalized Children


Video Calls Benefit Some Hospitalized Children

“Virtual visits” with loved ones help reduce stress for some—but not all—hospitalized children. Having access to video chat technology reduced stress levels for kids who lived an average of 35 miles from the hospital and were only hospitalized for about five days. However, pediatric patients whose hospital stays were longer or whose families lived farther away saw no real stress-reducing benefit from the technology. More… Discuss

news: Measles Virus Used to Wipe Out Cancer (multiple myeloma)


Measles Virus Used to Wipe Out Cancer

Researchers are cautiously optimistic about an experimental cancer treatment that uses a modified measles virus to target and kill cancerous cells. Two out of six multiple myeloma patients who were treated with extremely high doses of the engineered viruses responded to the treatment, with one appearing to enter into complete remission. These two patients were found to have few or no circulating measles antibodies, important because this affords the virus a chance to attack the cancer cells before the patient’s immune system begins fighting off the virus. More… Discuss

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NEWS: US GAINING GROUND IN FIGHT AGAINST HOSPITAL-ACQUIRED INFECTIONS


US Gaining Ground in Fight against Hospital-Acquired Infections

The risk of contracting a hospital-acquired infection is dropping in the US, and that is good news, but the statistics are still far from comforting. According to theCenters for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately one in every 25 patients in the US will pick up an infection at a hospital or similar medical facility. This means that over the course of a year, about 600,000 patients come down with a nosocomial, or hospital-acquired, infection. Of them, about 74,000 end up battling more than one. Still, this is significantly down from the 1970s, when an estimated 2.1 million patients a year would develop a hospital-acquired infection, and even from the 1990s, when this number was about 1.7 million. More… Discuss

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SOUTHNEWS: AFRICAN HOSPITALS SENDING HOME PATIENTS WITH DEADLY TB


South African Hospitals Sending Home Patients with Deadly TB

Researchers have identified an alarming practice in South Africa that is contributing to the spread ofextensively-drug resistant (XDR) and totally drug-resistant (TDR) tuberculosis. When patients with these highly drug-resistant strains of TB do not respond totreatment, South African hospitals routinely discharge them and allow them to return to their homes, where they may expose relatives and other members of their communities to the disease. The problem is that doctors need to free up beds in TB hospitals for patients who may respond to treatment, but there are few residential or palliative care facilities to accept the patients they discharge. More… Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: SERIAL KILLER DOCTOR HANGS HIMSELF IN HIS CELL (2004)


Serial Killer Doctor Hangs Himself in His Cell (2004)

To English doctor Harold Shipman, the fundamental medical principle of “first do no harm” apparently meant little. After practicing medicine for decades, he aroused suspicion in 1998, when it emerged that he was named the sole beneficiary in a deceased patient’s will—a will that Shipman turned out to have forged. He was arrested and ultimately convicted of killing 15 patients, but he is suspected of more than 200 murders. The final life he took was his own. How did “Dr. Death” kill his victims? More…

 

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