Tag Archives: percussion instrument

Castanets


Castanets

Now used primarily in Spanish dance music, castanets are percussion instruments that were known to the ancient Egyptians and Greeks. Of the many kinds, the most common consist of two small matching pieces of hard wood or ivory, joined at the inner edge and used with a thin strap in the player’s hand. They are snapped together between the palm and fingers and used to produce clicks for rhythmic accents, especially to accompany dancing. What is the origin of the instrument’s name? More… Discuss

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Ballade for cello and piano Op.15 by Serge Prokofiev: make mosic part of your life series


Ballade for cello and piano Op.15 by Serge Prokofiev

 

today’s birthday: Carlos Santana (1947)


Carlos Santana (1947)

Santana is a Mexican-American Grammy Award-winning guitarist. He became famous in the 1960s with his eponymous band, which pioneered a fusion of rock and Latin music. The band’s sound features his melodic, blues-based guitar lines set against Latin and African rhythms featuring percussion instruments—like timbales and congas—not generally heard in rock music. Santana was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998. What instrument did he play as a boy before switching to guitar? More…
[youtube.com/watch?v=OQBXcYUEdS4]

The Best of Santana ( Full Album ) 1998

Released: March,1998
Label: Columbia A&R: John Kalodner
Produced by: Bob Irwin Mastered by: George Marino

Tracklist:

“Jingo” 00:00
Evil Ways04:15
“Black Magic Woman/Gypsy Queen” 08:09
Oye Como Va13:29
Samba Pa Ti17:46
“She’s Not There” 22:32
“No One To Depend On” 26:42
“Open Invitation” 32:14
“Hold On” 37:00
“Bella” 41:23
“Winning” 45:54
“All I Ever Wanted” 49:22
“Dance Sister Dance ( Baila Mi Hermana )” 53:25
“Europa ( Earth’s Cry Heaven’s Smile )” 01:01:41
“Everybody’s Everything” 01:06:48
Soul Sacrifice01:10:19

 

Carl Orff – Sunt Lacrimae Rerum – Singphoniker Münchner – July 10, 1995



Performance of a selection from Carl Orff‘s “Sunt Lacrimae Rerum“, men’s choir (TTTBBB) and soloists (TBarB), by the Singphoniker Münchner on July 10, 1995 – Carl Orff’s 100th birthday, at the composer’s gravesite in the Klosterkirche Andechs, near the composer’s home in Dießen am Ammersee

The inscription on the memorial plaque reads, “Summus Finis”, “The Highest Goal”

The title of the music is from the Aeneid, line 462 of Book I – “sunt lacrimae rerum” – “There are tears for things”

The lyrics are from The Book of Ecclesiastes 8:15

Omnium deliciarum et pomparum saeculi brevis finis.
Mors, dolor, luctus et paror invadit omnes. 
In hora ultima peribunt omnia: tuba, tibia et cythera, jocus, visus, saltus, cantus et discantus.

Of all delights and pomps of the world the time is short
Death, pain and mourning invadeth all.
At the last hour perisheth all things: the trumpet, the flute and the lyre, joy, laughter, dancing, singing, and harmony.

Die Singphoniker are (thanks to Daniel Schreiber for this information):

Alfons Brandl, Hubert Nettinger, Ludwig Thomas- tenors. Berno Scharpf, Gunnar Mühling- baritones. Christian Schmidt, bass.

Music Publisher: Schott C39534 ISMN: 979-0-001-00875-4
available here:
http://www.schott-music.com/shop/1/sh…

 


The Sistrum

The sistrum is a percussion instrument that functions much like a tambourine. Often made of metal, it consists of a handle and a U-shaped frame run through with thin, loosely set crossbars. The crossbars can have little metal rings or loops on them, and when the sistrum is shaken, the crossbars and loops jangle. The sistrum was used in ancient Sumer, Rome, and Egypt, and some Egyptian goddesses were depicted holding the instrument. What churches still use the sistrum in religious services? More… Discuss

 From New England comes Douglas Irvine, a composer, sound artist and instrument maker, the sounds that he creates are inspired on the musical traditions of ancient Middle Eastern cultures, like ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia. This record have a great aura, with different sensations, its ritualistic, relaxed, deep, dark, ethereal and mystic. This are some of the old instruments that you could ear on this great record that e real advice: bass lyre, bells and miscellaneous percussions, shoulder harp, clappers, pan pipes, double Oboe etc. Ambient Egypt is a varied collection of musical soundscapes inspired by ancient Egyptian traditions.

Although music existed in prehistoric Egypt, the evidence for it becomes secure only in the historical (or “dynastic” or “pharaonic”) period–after 3100 BCE. Music formed an important part of Egyptian life, and musicians occupied a variety of positions in Egyptian society. Music found its way into many contexts in Egypt: temples, palaces, workshops, farms, battlefields and the tomb. Music was an integral part of religious worship in ancient Egypt, so it is not surprising that there were gods specifically associated with music, such as Hathor and Bes (both were also associated with dance, fertility and childbirth).

All the major categories of musical instruments (percussion, wind, stringed) were represented in pharaonic Egypt. Percussion instruments included hand-held drums, rattles, castanets, bells, and the sistrum–a highly important rattle used in religious worship. Hand clapping too was used as a rhythmic accompaniment. Wind instruments included flutes (double and single, with reeds and without) and trumpets. Stringed instruments included harps, lyres, and lutes–plucked rather than bowed. Instruments were frequently inscribed with the name of the owner and decorated with representations of the goddess (Hathor) or god (Bes) of music. Both male and female voices were also frequently used in Egyptian music.

Professional musicians existed on a number of social levels in ancient Egypt. Perhaps the highest status belonged to temple musicians; the office of “musician” (shemayet) to a particular god or goddess was a position of high status frequently held by women. Musicians connected with the royal household were held in high esteem, as were certain gifted singers and harp players. Somewhat lower on the social scale were musicians who acted as entertainers for parties and festivals, frequently accompanied by dancers. Informal singing is suggested by scenes of workers in action; captions to many of these pictures have been interpreted as words of songs. Otherwise there is little evidence for the amateur musician in pharaonic Egypt, and it is unlikely that musical achievement was seen as a desirable goal for individuals who were not professionals.

The ancient Egyptians did not notate their music before the Graeco-Roman period, so attempts to reconstruct pharaonic music remain speculative. Representational evidence can give a general idea of the sound of Egyptian music. Ritual temple music was largely a matter of the rattling of the sistrum, accompanied by voice, sometimes with harp and/or percussion. Party/festival scenes show ensembles of instruments (lyres, lutes, double and single reed flutes, clappers, drums) and the presence (or absence) of singers in a variety of situations.