Tag Archives: Piano

Fabulous rendition: Mozart Concerto D Minor K466 Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa


Mozart Concerto D Minor K466 Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa

great compositions/performances: Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 3, in C minor, Op. 37, Daniel Barenboim / Dresden Staatskapelle 2007


Beethoven : Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37 Daniel Barenboim / Dresden Staatskapelle 2007

historic musical bits: Beethoven, Sonata para piano Nº 24 en Si flat major op.78 ‘À Thérèse’. Daniel Barenboim, piano


Beethoven, Sonata para piano Nº 24 en Si flat major op.78 ‘À Thérèse’. Daniel Barenboim, piano

Make music part of your life series: Brahms – 16 Waltzes Op. 39, Karin Lechner, Piano


Brahms – 16 Waltzes Op. 39, Karin Lechner, Piano

historic Musical Bits: Wilhelm Kempff plays Chopin Impromptu No. 3 in G flat Op. 51 (rec.1958)


Wilhelm Kempff plays Chopin Impromptu No. 3 in G flat Op. 51 (rec.1958)

Fabulous Renditions: Beethoven “Für Elise” Valentina Lisitsa Seoul Philharmonic


Beethoven “Für Elise” Valentina Lisitsa Seoul Philharmonic

fabulous musical renditions: Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa


Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa

FABULOUS MUSICAL RENDITIONS: Exploding Beethoven: Tempest Sonata Live from Paris Valentina Lisitsa


Exploding Beethoven: Tempest Sonata Live from Paris Valentina Lisitsa

Best musical Interpretations: Beethoven Sonata Op 57 “Appassionata” Mov1, ,3, Valentina Lisitsa, piano


Beethoven Sonata Op 57 “Appassionata” Mov1

historic musical bits: Claudio Arrau Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 30


Claudio Arrau Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 30

great compositions/performances: Beethoven Piano Sonata 10 G major Barenboim


Beethoven Piano Sonata 10 G major Barenboim

 

Historic Musical Bits: Mozart: Piano concerto n. No. 21 in C major, K.467(“Elvira Madigan”) Pollini-Muti


Mozart: Piano concerto n. No. 21 in C major, K.467 (“Elvira Madigan”) Pollini-Muti

historic musical bits: Shostakovich Plays Shostakovich – Piano Concerto No. 2 in F major, Op. 102


Shostakovich Plays Shostakovich – Piano Concerto No. 2 in F major, Op. 102

historic musical bits: Rudolf Firkušný: Humoresques op. 101, Antonín Dvořák


Rudolf Firkušný: Humoresques op. 101, Antonín Dvořák

historic musical bits: Paul Tortelier “Cello Sonata in D minor” by Debussy (1959)


Paul Tortelier “Cello Sonata D minor” Debussy

historic musical bits: Itzhak Perlman – Pugnani Kreisler-Preludium and Allegro


Itzhak Perlman-Pugnani Kreisler-Preludium and Allegro

Great compositions/performances: Beethoven, Piano Sonata No. 7 in D major Op 10, No. 3. Daniel Barenboim, piano


Beethoven, Piano Sonata No. 7 in D major Op 10, No. 3.
Daniel Barenboim, piano

great compositions/performances: Anne-Sophie Mutter – Brahms – Violin Sonata No 2 in A major, Op 100


Anne-Sophie Mutter – Brahms – Violin Sonata No 2 in A major, Op 100

historic musical bits: Pollini Chopin Mazurka op.56 No.3 Vienna 1986


Pollini Chopin Mazurka op.56 No.3 Live

great compositions/performances: Julia Fischer – Tchaikovsky – Souvenir d’un lieu cher, Op 42


Julia Fischer – Tchaikovsky – Souvenir d’un lieu cher, Op 42

great compositions/performances: Saint-Saëns – Le carnaval des animaux (The Carnival of the Animals) (1886)


Saint-Saëns – Le carnaval des animaux (The Carnival of the Animals) (1886)

great compositions/performances: Tchaikovsky Overture 1812 for Piano| Valentina Lisitsa


Tchaikovsky Overture 1812 for Piano | Valentina Lisitsa

great compositions/performances: 12 Variations in E-Flat Major on “Je suis Lindor,” K. 354| Karl Engel (Piano)


12 Variations in E-Flat Major on “Je suis Lindor,” K. 354

Beethoven, Sonata para piano Nº 24 en Fa♯ (F sharp Major) major op.78 ‘À Thérèse’. Daniel Barenboim, piano


Beethoven, Sonata para piano Nº 24 en Fa♯ (F sharp major) mayor op.78 ‘À Thérèse’. Daniel Barenboim, piano

great compositions/performances: ENRIQUE GRANADOS.- Danzas Españolas (Piano: Alicia de Larrocha)


ENRIQUE GRANADOS.- Danzas Españolas

Martha Argerich plays Schumann – Kinderszenen (Scenes from Childhood) Op. 15


Martha Argerich Schumann – Kinderszenen (Scenes from Childhood) Op. 15

great compositions/performances: Annie Fischer plays Beethoven – Piano Sonata 26,Op.81a Les Adieux’ (Color-Coded Analysis)


Beethoven – Piano Sonata 26,Op.81a “Farewell” (Color-Coded Analysis)

historic musical bits: BIZET Jeux d’enfants Op.22 | Duo Kontarsky | 1982 *vinyl*


BIZET Jeux d’enfants Op.22 | Duo Kontarsky | 1982 *vinyl*

Saint-Saëns – Concerto no 1 pour piano et orchestre – Jeanne-Marie Darré


Saint-Saëns – Concerto no 1 pour piano et orchestre – Jeanne-Marie Darré

Amazing music/golden performances: Schumann Symphonic Etudes Op. 13 & Op.Posth. Valentina Lisitsa


Schumann Symphonic Etudes Op. 13 & Op.Posth. Valentina Lisitsa

Historic Musical Bits: Michelangeli Debussy Preludes Book 1


Michelangeli Debussy Preludes
Book 1

 

Saint-Saëns – Concerto no 1 pour piano et orchestre – Jeanne-Marie Darré


Saint-Saëns – Concerto no 1 pour piano et orchestre – Jeanne-Marie Darré


Schumann Kinderszenen op. 15 Radu Lupu

Published on Oct 18, 2013

Robert Schumann Kinderszenen, op. 15
Radu Lupu , January 1993

Kinderszenen

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

First edition title page

Kinderszenen (German pronunciation: [ˈkɪndɐˌst͡seːnən]; original spelling Kinderscenen, “Scenes from Childhood”), Opus 15, by Robert Schumann, is a set of thirteen pieces of music for piano written in 1838. In this work, Schumann provides us with his adult reminiscences of childhood. Schumann had originally written 30 movements for this work, but chose 13 for the final version.[1] Robert Polansky has discussed the unused movements.[2]

Nr. 7, Träumerei, is one of Schumann’s best known pieces; it was the title of a 1944 German biographical film on Robert Schumann.[3] Träumerei is also the opening and closing musical theme in the 1947 Hollywood film Song of Love, starring Katharine Hepburn as Clara Wieck Schumann.[4]

Schumann had originally labeled this work Leichte Stücke (Easy Pieces). Likewise, the section titles were only added after the completion of the music, and Schumann described the titles as “nothing more than delicate hints for execution and interpretation”.[5] Timothy Taylor has discussed Schumann’s choice of titles for this work in the context of the changing situation of music in 19th century culture and economics.[6]

In 1974, Eric Sams noted that there was no known complete manuscript of Kinderszenen.[7]

Parts/Movements

  1. Von fremden Ländern und Menschen (Of Foreign Lands and Peoples),  G major
  2. Curiose Geschichte (A Curious Story),  D major
  3. Hasche-Mann (Blind Man’s Buff), B minor
  4. Bittendes Kind (Pleading Child), D major
  5. Glückes genug (Quite Happy), D major
  6. Wichtige Bebebenheit (An Important Event), A major
  7. Träumerei (Dreaming), F major
  8. Am Camin (At the Fireside), F major
  9. Ritter vom Steckenpferd (Knight of the Hobby-Horse), C major
  10. Fast zu ernst (Almost too Serious), G-sharp minor
  11. Fürchtenmachen (Frightening), E minor
  12. Kind im Einschlummern (Child Falling Asleep), E minor
  13. Ffrom Der Dichter spricht (The Poet Speaks), G major

Description by Blair Johnston  (ALL MUSIC)

The 13 pieces that constitute Robert Schumann‘s Kinderszenen for piano (Scenes from Childhood), Op. 15 (1838) showcase their creator’s musical imagination at the peak of its poetic clarity. As a result, the Kinderszenen have long been staples of the repertoire as utterly charming yet substantial miniatures, the sort of compact keyboard essays in which Schumann‘s genius found full expression. Kinderszenen was one of the projects Schumann worked on during the spring of 1838 to get through a difficult period of separation from his fiancée, Clara Wieck, who was on tour as a pianist and whose father objected to the idea of her marriage to the composer. In March of that year, Schumann wrote to Clara, “I have been waiting for your letter and have in the meantime filled several books with pieces…. You once said to me that I often seemed like a child, and I suddenly got inspired and knocked off around 30 quaint little pieces…. I selected several and titled them Kinderszenen. You will enjoy them, though you will need to forget that you are a virtuoso when you play them.” The Kinderszenen are a touching tribute to the eternal, universal memories and feelings of childhood from a nostalgic adult perspective; unlike a number of Schumann‘s collections of piano character pieces (e.g. Album for the Young, Op. 68), the Kinderszenen are not intended to be played by children. Schumann claimed that the picturesque titles attached to the pieces were added as an afterthought in order to provide subtle suggestions to the player, a model Debussy followed decades later in his Preludes. Almost all of the Kinderszenen are miniature ternary (ABA) forms. Scene No. 1, “Von fremden Ländern und Menschen” (Of Foreign Lands and People), opens with a lovely melody whose basic motivic substance, by appearing in several vague guises throughout many of the other pieces, serves as a general unifying element. The seventh Scene, “Träumerei” (Reverie), is easily the most famous piece in the set; its charming melody and quieting power have recommended it to generations of concert pianists who wish to calm audiences after a long series of rousing encores. The Kinderszenen contain many delicate musical touches; Scene No. 4, “Bittendes Kind” (Pleading Child), for example, is harmonically resolved only when an unseen force (a parent?) gives in and grant the child’s wish at the beginning of No. 5, “Glückes genug” (Quite Happy). In the final piece, “Der Dichter spricht” (The Poet Speaks), Schumann removes himself just a bit from the indulgent reverie to formulate a narrator’s omniscient view of the child. Quietly, gently, the many moods and feelings that Schumann touched upon over the course of this remarkable 20-minute work are lovingly recalled, and the composition concludes, contentedly, in the same key of G major in which it began.

great compositions/performances: Maurice Ravel – Sonatine pour piano: Gabriele Tomasello, piano.


Maurice Ravel – Sonatine pour piano

historic musical bits: Sviatoslav Richter – Chopin – Andante spianato et grande polonaise brillante in E-flat major, Op 22


Sviatoslav Richter – Chopin – Andante spianato et grande polonaise brillante in E-flat major, Op 22

great compositions/performances: Beethoven, Sonata para piano Nº 1 en fa menor Opus 2 Nº 1. Daniel Barenboim, piano


 


Beethoven, Sonata para piano Nº 1 en fa menor Opus 2 Nº 1. Daniel Barenboim, piano

 

great compositions/performances: Evgeny Kissin – Schumann-Liszt – Widmung (Liebeslied)



Evgeny Kissin – Schumann-Liszt – Widmung (Liebeslied)

great compositions/performances: Arabesque No. 1 from Deux Arabesques , Aldo Chiccolini


 


Debussy – Arabesque No. 1 (Ciccolini)

 

Historic Musical Bits: Wilhelm Kempff plays Robert Schumann – Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54 (Symphonie-Orchester des Bayerischem Rundfunks, Rafael Kubelik)


Robert Schumann – Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54

Wilhelm Kempff, piano
Symphonie-Orchester des Bayerischem Rundfunks, Rafael Kubelik

Movements:

Allegro affettuoso (A minor) 00:00:00
Intermezzo: Andantino grazioso (F major) 00:15:43
Allegro vivace (A major) 00:21:27
*****************************************************************
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54, is a Romantic concerto by Robert Schumann, completed in 1845. The work premiered in Leipzig on 1 January 1846 with Clara Schumann playing the solo part. Ferdinand Hiller, the work’s dedicatee, conducted.

History

Schumann had earlier worked on several piano concerti: he began one in E-flat major in 1828, from 1829–31 he worked on one in F major, and in 1839, he wrote one movement of a concerto in D minor. None of these works were completed.

In 1841, Schumann wrote a fantasy for piano and orchestra, his Phantasie. His pianist wife Clara urged him to expand this piece into a full piano concerto. In 1845 he added the intermezzo and finale to complete the work. It was the only piano concerto that Schumann completed.

The work may have been used as a model by Edvard Grieg in composing his own Piano Concerto, also in A minor. Grieg’s concerto, like Schumann’s, employs a single powerful orchestral chord at its introduction before the piano’s entrance with a similar descending flourish. Rachmaninov also used the work as a model for his first Piano Concerto.

After this concerto, Schumann wrote two other pieces for piano and orchestra: the Introduction and Allegro Appassionato in G major (Op. 92), and the Introduction and Allegro Concertante in D minor (Op. 134).

Instrumentation

The concerto is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 trumpets, timpani, strings, and solo piano.

Structure

The piece, as marked in the score, is in three movements:

  1. Allegro affettuoso (A minor)

  2. Intermezzo: Andantino grazioso (F major)

  3. Allegro vivace (A major)

There is no break between these last two movements (attacca subito).

Schumann preferred that the movements be listed in concert programs as only two movements:[citation needed]

  1. Allegro affettuoso
  2. Andantino and Rondo

The three movement listing is the more common form used.

Allegro affettuoso

The piece starts with an energetic strike by strings and timpani, followed by a fierce, descending attack by the piano. The first theme is introduced by the oboe along with wind instruments. The theme is then given to the soloist. Schumann provides great variety with this theme. He first offers it in the A minor key of the piece, then we hear it again in major, and we can also hear small snatches of the tune in a very slow, A flat section. The clarinet is often used against the piano in this movement. Toward the end of the movement, the piano launches into a long cadenza before the orchestra joins in with one more melody and builds for the exciting finish.

Intermezzo

This movement is keyed in F major. The piano and strings open up the piece with a small, delicate tune, which is heard throughout the movement before the cellos and later the other strings finally take the main theme, with the piano mainly used as accompaniment. The movement closes with small glimpses of the first movement’s theme before moving straight into the third movement.

Allegro vivace

The movement opens with a huge run up the strings while the piano takes the main, A major theme. Schumann shows great color and variety in this movement. The tune is regal, and the strings are noble. Though it is in 3/4 timing, Schumann manipulates it so that the time signature is often ambiguous. The piece finishes with a restating of the previous material before finally launching into an exciting finale, and ending with a long timpani roll and a huge chord from the orchestra.

Further reading

 

Best Classical Music, Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575, great compositions/performances


 


Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575

 

best classical music, ENRIQUE GRANADOS.- Danzas Españolas ENRIQUE , Piano: Alicia de Larrocha, gregaat compositions/performances


ENRIQUE GRANADOS.- Danzas Españolas,  Piano: Alicia de Larrocha

best classical music, Hamelin plays Gershwin – Concerto in F , great compositions/performanes


Hamelin plays Gershwin – Concerto in F

Antonín Dvořák – Legends, Op. 59, Ingryd Thorson & Julian Thurber, piano


Antonín Dvořák – Legends, Op. 59

LISZT: Concerto no. 2 – Riccardo Muti, conductor / Paolo Restani, piano


LISZT: Concerto no. 2 – Riccardo Muti, conductor / Paolo Restani,
***********piano

Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 24 in F-sharp, op. 78 “À Thérèse” Daniel Barenboim, great compositions/performances


Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 24 in F-sharp, op. 78 “À Thérèse”, Daniel Barenboim

Tzvi Erez plays Mozart Rondo Alla Turca from Sonata No. 11 in A, K. 331, great compositions/performances


Tzvi Erez plays Mozart Rondo Alla Turca from Sonata No. 11 in A, K. 331

Mendelssohn Piano Quartet No. 2 in F minor, Op. 2, Adagio , great compositions/performances


Mendelssohn Piano Quartet No. 2 in F minor, Op. 2, Adagio

Piano at Nataf, 2nd Season, Concert No. 3, 17.2.2012 (2.3.M.2) Felix Mendelssohn Piano Quartet No. 2 in F minor, Op. 2, 2. Adagio The Israel Piano Quartet: Revital Hachamoff, piano; Gilad Hildesheim, violin; Shuli Waterman, viola; Ira Givol, cello More music by Felix Mendelssohn at euzicasa:

HERE

HERE

HERE

Thanks for visiting and enjoying classical music! GEorge-B🙂

Happy Birthday Mozart – Week: Mozart – Piano Sonatas – Classical Music (COMPLETE)


Mozart – Piano Sonatas – Classical Music (COMPLETE)

Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in A Major D664. great compositions/performances


Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in A Major D664