Tag Archives: police officer

Rosenborg Castle


Rosenborg Castle

Rosenborg Castle is situated at the center of the Danish capital, Copenhagen. It was built in 1606 in the Dutch Renaissance style and went through several expansions to arrive at its present condition in 1624. It was used by Danish regents as a royal residence until around 1710 and was opened to the public in 1838. Today, it is popular with tourists who flock to the castle to view the Danish Crown Regalia. How many people visit the Rosenborg Castle Garden every year? More… Discuss

Advertisements

picture of the day: Crash of the Hindenburg


 

Crash of the Hindenburg

At 7:25 p.m. on May 6, 1937, the giant German airship Hindenburg burst into flames and crashed to the ground as it attempted to dock with a mooring mast at Lakehurst Naval Air Station in New Jersey. Carrying 36 passengers and 61 crew, Hindenburg left Frankfurt on May 4 for its first transatlantic voyage of the 1937 season. A total of 36 died when the fire ignited the 16 hydrogen-filled cells and destroyed the zeppelin in only 34 seconds. The true cause of the disaster remains a mystery, although crash investigators considered claims that Hindenburg was lost due to sabotage or an accidental charge of static electricity.

Photo: National Archives

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.9RYEt6Ya.dpuf

Search NOVA Online: Why? Check out the amazing stories here! (bookmark NOVA – a lot to return to!)


 

this pressed: Inspector general: Some NY police use chokehold as first response|info 24.us


NEW YORK (Reuters) – A new inspector general blasted the New York City Police Department on Monday for failing to punish officers who used banned chokeholds on citizens, sometimes as a first response in a confrontation.

The first official report by police Inspector General Philip Eure comes a month after New York was shaken first by a grand jury’s decision not to indict an NYPD officer in the chokehold death of Eric Garner and then by the killing of two NYPD officers by a gunman avenging the Staten Island man’s death.

It looked at 10 recent cases in which the NYPD’s Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB), an independent agency tasked with investigating excessive force claims, concluded officers used chokeholds, which are banned by police department regulations. The cases were documented between 2009 and July 2014 and do not include Garner’s death on July 17, 2014.

Among the 10 cases was a Bronx high school student who was walking away from school officials disciplining her on Jan. 8, 2008, and was placed in a chokehold by a police officer assigned to the building, the report said.

EW YORK (Reuters) – A new inspector general blasted the New York City Police Department on Monday for failing to punish officers who used banned chokeholds on citizens, sometimes as a first response in a confrontation.

The first official report by police Inspector General Philip Eure comes a month after New York was shaken first by a grand jury’s decision not to indict an NYPD officer in the chokehold death of Eric Garner and then by the killing of two NYPD officers by a gunman avenging the Staten Island man’s death.

It looked at 10 recent cases in which the NYPD’s Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB), an independent agency tasked with investigating excessive force claims, concluded officers used chokeholds, which are banned by police department regulations. The cases were documented between 2009 and July 2014 and do not include Garner’s death on July 17, 2014.

Among the 10 cases was a Bronx high school student who was walking away from school officials disciplining her on Jan. 8, 2008, and was placed in a chokehold by a police officer assigned to the building, the report said.

via Inspector general: Some NY police use chokehold as first response.

this pressed for your right to know: French police commissioner kills himself hours after Charlie Hebdo attack


A French police commissioner reportedly killed himself just hours after the bloody massacre at the Paris office of Charlie Hebdo that left 12 dead.

Helric Fredou, who co-workers claim had been battling depression, shot himself Wednesday night in his office in Limoges, France 3 reported.

The body of 45-year-old Fredou was found by a colleague at approximately 1 a.m. Thursday, according to French media reports, which stated the commissioner was suffering from depression and burnout. Colleagues told France 3 that Fredou, who was single with no children, was feeling overworked and overwhelmed by his job.

Fredou had reportedly met with a family member of one of the Charlie Hebdo victims before committing suicide.

via French police commissioner kills himself hours after Charlie Hebdo attack.

Mozart: Haffner Serenade KV 250 / Slide show: Glamour Girls and other beauties, great compositions/performances


Mozart: Haffner Serenade KV 250 / Slide show: Glamour Girls and other beauties

the ALAMO: Word of the standoff ricocheted across America, prompting a deluge of supportive messages for the fatigued but tenacious holdout.


The Alamo, built in the 18th century from locally quarried limestone, rests deep in the heart of Texas. (Photo: Library of Congress)

The Alamo, built in the 18th century from locally quarried limestone, rests deep in the heart of Texas. (Photo: Library of Congress) – See more at: http://www.historynet.com/here-is-where-holding-the-fort-in-san-antonio.htm#sthash.BtnOn3Zo.dpuf

Barricaded in a freezing cold, rat-infested room inside the Alamo, the lone defender had gone almost three days without food, water or sleep after armed men had positioned themselves around the compound. Word of the standoff ricocheted across America, prompting a deluge of supportive messages for the fatigued but tenacious holdout.

“Win or lose, we congratulate you upon your splendid patriotism and courage,” read one telegram from New York signed by John B. Adams, a descendant of President John Adams. Editors from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch wired San Antonio: “Commandant of the Alamo:—Will you send…a message to the women of St. Louis, who are watching with great interest your own gallant defense of the Alamo?”

The “commandant” was no military officer but a 46-year-old Texas schoolteacher named Adina De Zavala, who had commenced her one-woman siege on February 10, 1908. De Zavala replied to the Post-Dispatch: “My immortal forefathers suffered every privation to defend the freedom of Texas. I, like them, am willing to die for what I believe to be right. . . . The officers cannot starve me into submission.”

De Zavala’s impassioned statement echoed the urgent message Lt. Col. William Barret Travis had dashed off 72 years earlier, on February 24, 1836, when his 200 Texan and Tejano rebels were fortified inside the old mission, surrounded by several thousand Mexican troops under President General Antonio López de Santa Anna.

“To the People of Texas and All Americans in the World,” Travis wrote, “I am besieged, by a thousand or more of the Mexicans under Santa Anna—I have sustained a continual Bombardment & cannonade for 24 hours & have not lost a man—The enemy has demanded a surrender at discretion, otherwise, the garrison are to be put to the sword, if the fort is taken—I have answered the demand with a cannon shot, & our flag still waves proudly from the walls—I shall never surrender or retreat. Then, I call on you in the name of Liberty, of patriotism, & every thing dear to the American character, to come to our aid, with all dispatch. . . . If this call is neglected, I am determined to sustain myself as long as possible & die like a soldier who never forgets what is due to his own honor & that of his country—Victory or Death.”

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/here-is-where-holding-the-fort-in-san-antonio.htm#sthash.BtnOn3Zo.dpuf

FROM FRANCE 24: How a string of ‘isolated’ attacks put France on high alert!


How a string of ‘isolated’ attacks put France on high alert

http://f24.my/13C47bk 

or HERE

Texas Rangers investigate officer who killed suspect holding spoon


Texas Rangers investigate officer who killed suspect holding spoon

AUSTIN, Texas (Reuters) – The Texas Rangers are investigating an incident in Texarkana in which a police officer responding to a reported burglary fatally shot a suspect who was holding a spoon, officials said on Tuesday.

The incident comes as increased scrutiny has been placed on police following the deaths of unarmed suspects at the hands of police that have sparked protests nationwide.

In Texarkana, the officer arrived at the scene of the reported burglary at about 2 a.m. Monday and found a suspect in the garage of a house, police in the East Texas city said.

“The suspect then came toward the officer in an aggressive manner with a metal object in his hand,” police said. The officer fired one shot, striking the suspect, Dennis Grigsby, 35, in the chest. He later died at a hospital.

The object Grigsby was holding was found to be a spoon.

via Texas Rangers investigate officer who killed suspect holding spoon.

this pressed for your necessity to know : Congressional staffers walk out to protest killings by police|CBSNEWS


Congressional staffers walk out to protest killings by police

Congressional staffers walk out to protest killings by police (click to read the story at CBSNEWS)

WASHINGTON — Members of Congress, staffers and other Capitol employees stood silently on the House steps Thursday and raised their hands in the air to protest the killing of unarmed black men by police.

They bowed their heads as Senate Chaplain Barry C. Black prayed, “Forgive us when we have failed to lift our voices for those who couldn’t speak or breathe for themselves” — emphasizing “breathe” in reference to Eric Garner, who died after a policeman grabbed him in a chokehold in New York.

“May we not forget that in our history injustice has often been maintained because good people failed to promptly act,” Black said, with well over 100 people standing behind him.

CIA Director admits to some use of brutal tactics in rare televised news conference — CBS Evening News


ASSOCIATED PRESS: Police Chokehold Death


ASSOCIATED PRESS: Police Chokehold Death

Demonstrators march across the Brooklyn Bridge during a protest against a grand jury‘s decision not to indict the police officer involved in the death of Eric Garner, Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014, in New York. A grand jury cleared a white New York City police officer Wednesday in the videotaped chokehold death of Garner, an unarmed black man, who had been stopped on suspicion of selling loose, untaxed cigarettes. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

 

More HERE and HERE

from Democracy Now: “I Can’t Breathe”: As Protests Erupt in NYC, Eric Garner’s Nephew Speaks Out on Grand Jury Ruling


Published on Dec 4, 2014

Visit http://democracynow.org to watch the full daily independent, global news hour. This is a summary of top news headlines from the U.S. and around the world on Thursday, December 4, 2014. Go to the Democracy Now! website to read the complete transcript, search the vast news archive, and to make a donation to support our daily, non-profit news program.

In this video, you’ll learn about these top news headlines:

*Protests Erupt in NYC After Grand Jury Clears Cop in Chokehold Death of Eric Garner

*Cleveland Officer Who Killed 12-Year-Old Was Deemed Unfit, Had “Dismal” Gun Performance

*Philippines Braces for Super Typhoon in Midst of U.N. Climate Summit

*Colombian Gov’t to Resume Peace Talks with FARC

*Iran Launches Airstrikes Against ISIS; U.S. Denies Cooperation

*Al-Qaeda Threatens to Kill U.S. Journalist in Yemen

*Lawmakers Agree on $585 Billion Military Bill Expanding ISIS Offensive

*3 Women Detail Assaults by Bill Cosby; Events Cancelled After Attendees Return Tickets

*Teenager Arrested for Rape in Oklahoma Following Mass Walkout

*Supreme Court Hears Pregnancy Discrimination Case

*Labor Dept. Issues Rule on Anti-LGBT Discrimination

*17 States Sue Obama over Executive Action on Immigration

*Appeals Court Stays Execution of Schizophrenic Texas Prisoner Scott Panetti

*Upstate New York Peace Activist Spared Jail Time After Drone Protest

*Democracy Now!, is an independent global news hour that airs weekdays on 1,300+ TV and radio stations Monday through Friday. Watch our livestream 8-9am ET at http://democracynow.org.

*Please consider supporting independent media by making a donation to Democracy Now! today: http://owl.li/ruJ5Q

FOLLOW DEMOCRACY NOW! ONLINE:
Facebook: http://facebook.com/democracynow
Twitter: https://twitter.com/democracynow
YouTube: http://youtube.com/democracynow
SoundCloud: http://soundcloud.com/democracynow
Daily Email: http://democracynow.org/subscribe
Google+: https://plus.google.com/+DemocracyNow
Instagram: http://instagram.com/democracynow
Tumblr: http://democracynow.tumblr
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/democracynow

Thursday, December 4, 2014 Previous | Next

Hands Up, Don’t Choke

By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan

Another police killing of an unarmed man of color. Another grand jury deciding not to indict: Not for murder. Not for manslaughter. Not for assault. Not even for reckless endangerment. We live in a land of impunity. At least, for those in power.

This past summer, after covering the protests in Ferguson, Mo., I flew back to New York City and went straight to Staten Island to cover the march protesting the police killing of Eric Garner, a 43-year-old African-American father of six. This story was strikingly similar to the police killing in Ferguson, where Officer Darren Wilson gunned down unarmed African-American teenager Michael Brown. Both cases involved white police officers using deadly force. Both of the victims were unarmed African-Americans. In both cases, local prosecutors, with close ties to their local police departments, were allowed to control the grand jury. There were some differences between the cases. Most notably, Eric Garner’s killing was captured on video.

If you look at the video closely, just as NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo puts him in an illegal chokehold, you see Eric Garner put his hands up, the international signal of surrender. He is then taken down by a gang of police officers. You hear him repeatedly say, “I can’t breathe!” He says it a total of 11 times before he goes limp and dies.

Where did this video come from? A young man named Ramsey Orta was standing near Garner on that July 17 afternoon when the police moved in. Orta flipped open his cellphone and videoed the whole thing. Pantaleo was caught red-handed. The evidence was there for everyone to see. Well, the grand jury decided not to indict Pantaleo. Only two people were arrested in the wake of Garner’s death: Ramsey Orta, who shot the video, and his wife, Chrissie Ortiz. Chrissie told a local television station that since Ramsey was identified as the videographer, they had been subjected to police harassment. Ramsey was arrested the day after the city medical examiner declared Garner’s death a homicide. Chrissie was later arrested as well. I saw them at the Staten Island march that Saturday, standing near where Garner died. I asked them for comment, but they were afraid. They huddled on the same stoop that Ramsey was on when he filmed Garner’s death.

At that march on Staten Island on Aug. 23, while Ramsey and Chrissie chose not to speak, many did. “The Staten Island [district attorney] should not be prosecuting this case,” Constance Malcolm told me. “We need the feds to come in and take this case right now. We need accountability.”

Click here to read the full column posted at Truthdig.

Click here to listen to Amy Goodman’s podcast. Subscribe to her weekly podcast on SoundCloud and Stitcher Radio.

this pressed: Democracy Now: Hands up, Don’t choke!


Thursday, December 4, 2014 Previous | Next

Hands Up, Don’t Choke

By Amy Goodman with Denis Moynihan

Another police killing of an unarmed man of color. Another grand jury deciding not to indict: Not for murder. Not for manslaughter. Not for assault. Not even for reckless endangerment. We live in a land of impunity. At least, for those in power.

This past summer, after covering the protests in Ferguson, Mo., I flew back to New York City and went straight to Staten Island to cover the march protesting the police killing of Eric Garner, a 43-year-old African-American father of six. This story was strikingly similar to the police killing in Ferguson, where Officer Darren Wilson gunned down unarmed African-American teenager Michael Brown. Both cases involved white police officers using deadly force. Both of the victims were unarmed African-Americans. In both cases, local prosecutors, with close ties to their local police departments, were allowed to control the grand jury. There were some differences between the cases. Most notably, Eric Garner’s killing was captured on video.

If you look at the video closely, just as NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo puts him in an illegal chokehold, you see Eric Garner put his hands up, the international signal of surrender. He is then taken down by a gang of police officers. You hear him repeatedly say, “I can’t breathe!” He says it a total of 11 times before he goes limp and dies.

Where did this video come from? A young man named Ramsey Orta was standing near Garner on that July 17 afternoon when the police moved in. Orta flipped open his cellphone and videoed the whole thing. Pantaleo was caught red-handed. The evidence was there for everyone to see. Well, the grand jury decided not to indict Pantaleo. Only two people were arrested in the wake of Garner’s death: Ramsey Orta, who shot the video, and his wife, Chrissie Ortiz. Chrissie told a local television station that since Ramsey was identified as the videographer, they had been subjected to police harassment. Ramsey was arrested the day after the city medical examiner declared Garner’s death a homicide. Chrissie was later arrested as well. I saw them at the Staten Island march that Saturday, standing near where Garner died. I asked them for comment, but they were afraid. They huddled on the same stoop that Ramsey was on when he filmed Garner’s death.

At that march on Staten Island on Aug. 23, while Ramsey and Chrissie chose not to speak, many did. “The Staten Island [district attorney] should not be prosecuting this case,” Constance Malcolm told me. “We need the feds to come in and take this case right now. We need accountability.”

Click here to read the full column posted at Truthdig.

Click here to listen to Amy Goodman’s podcast. Subscribe to her weekly podcast on SoundCloud and Stitcher Radio.

this pressed: Ferguson protesters chanting ‘shame’ storm St. Louis City Hall; at least 2 arrested


Ferguson protesters chanting ‘shame’ storm St. Louis City Hall; at least 2 arrested
ST. LOUIS – Authorities have arrested at least two people at a protest over the Ferguson grand jury decision in which several demonstrators stormed City Hall in St. Louis.

An undetermined number of protesters made it into the building Wednesday while shouting “Shame, shame.”The protest march included several hundred people and began with a mock trial of Ferguson Officer Darren Wilson, who shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown. It was held on the steps of the Old Courthouse, the site of the Dred Scott trial.More than 100 additional police officers were called to the building and it was locked down.

A total of 58 people were arrested at area protests overnight, including 45 in Ferguson.

via Ferguson protesters chanting ‘shame’ storm St. Louis City Hall; at least 2 arrested.

this pressed: Ferguson: Michael Brown’s family speaks out on shooting, Officer Wilson and grand jury decision – CBS News


Ferguson: Michael Brown’s family speaks out on shooting, Officer Wilson and grand jury decision – CBS News.

Image

This pressed for your right to know: Ferguson protests spread across US


news_flash_animated1

 

Ferguson protests spread across US

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-30203526

this pressed for your information: Ferguson police officer won’t be charged in fatal shooting – The Washington Post


ST. LOUIS — A grand jury has declined to indict Darren Wilson, the white Ferguson, Mo. police officer whose fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager sparked days of turbulent protests and a national conversation about race and police interactions with African Americans, prosecutors said Monday.

The decision means that Wilson, 28, will face no state charges in the August shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown. Although a parallel federal civil rights investigation of the shooting is continuing, federal investigators have all but concluded they do not have a case against Wilson, either, law enforcement officials have said.

A separate federal probe of the Ferguson Police Department is underway. But the prospect that Wilson will face no direct legal consequences for Brown’s death was expected to trigger protests in the St. Louis area, and in the hours before the announcement, scores of demonstrators gathered near the area where Brown was killed.

via Ferguson police officer won’t be charged in fatal shooting – The Washington Post.

this pressed: 12-year-old dies in Cleveland police shooting – CNN.com


But he did reach for the weapon, Tomba said.

“The officers ordered him to stop and to show his hands and he went into his waistband and pulled out the weapon,” he said.

The 12-year-old’s name has not been released by police. He died early Sunday at MetroHealth Medical Center following surgery, according to the hospital and the family’s attorney.

Tomba showed reporters the weapon — a large, black BB– or pellet-type replica gun resembling a semiautomatic pistol. An orange tip indicating the gun was an air gun had been removed, police said.

According to the initial 911 call, provided by CNN affiliate WEWS, the boy was scaring people at the park.

“There’s a guy in there with a pistol, you know, it’s probably fake, but he’s like pointing it at everybody,” the caller said.

“He’s sitting on a swing right now, but he’s pulling it in and out of his pants and pointing it at people,” the caller said. “He’s probably a juvenile, you know?”

People who had gathered around the early-morning media scrum with Tomba hurled angry questions at him, accusing police of unnecessary violence.

“It’s a toy gun and a 12-year-old,” a woman in the crowd yelled as reporters tried to ask questions, according to video provided by WEWS.

While saying a thorough and open investigation was under way, Tomba defended the officers’ actions in what he called a “very, very tragic situation.”

“They were doing their job,” he said.

via 12-year-old dies in Cleveland police shooting – CNN.com.

this pressed: Amid Protests, Missouri Governor Orders Curfew in Ferguson


FBI michael brownAmid Protests, Missouri Governor Orders Curfew in Ferguson.

make music part of your life series: Serenata Española de Joaquim Malats Pepe Romero


[youtube.com/watch?v=we2csh9eaIc]

Serenata Española de Joaquim Malats Pepe Romero

read more about Joaquin Malats: Serenata Española @ takis konstantopoulos: for the promotion of rigour and rationality on BLOGGER! Check it out!

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pepe Romero (born March 8, 1944 in Málaga, Spain) is a world-renowned classical and flamenco guitarist. He is particularly famous for his outstanding technique and colorful musical interpretations on the instrument.

Pepe Romero
Pepe Romero 2000.JPG

Pepe Romero in 2000
Background information
Born March 8, 1944 (age 70)
Málaga, Spain
Genres Classical music, flamenco
Occupations Guitarist, arranger
Instruments Guitar
Years active fl. ca. 1959 – present
Labels Philips Records
Associated acts The Romero Guitar Quartet
Website www.peperomero.com
Notable instruments
Torres 1856

Biography

As a soloist Pepe Romero has appeared in the United States, Canada, Europe, China, and many countries around the world with the Toronto, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago, Houston, Pittsburgh, Boston, San Francisco and Dallas Symphony Orchestras, as well as with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, the New York, Bogota and Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestras, the Boston Pops Orchestra, the Hong Kong Sinfonietta and the London Symphony Orchestra, the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, the Monte Carlo Philharmonic Orchestra, I Musici, the Zurich Chamber Orchestra, Philharmonia Hungarica, the Hungarian State Orchestra, the Spanish National Orchestra, the Spanish National Radio/Television Orchestra, L’Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, The New Moscow Chamber Orchestra, the Springfiled Orchestra, the Lausanne Chamber Orchestra, the American Sinfonietta and the Bournemouth Symphony. He has been a special guest at the festivals of Salzburg, Israel, Schleswig-Holstein, Menuhin, Osaka, Granada, Istanbul, Ravinia, Garden State, Hollywood Bowl, Blossom, Wolf Trap, Saratoga and Hong Kong.

Since his first recording (at the age of 15) he has recorded over 50 solo albums and 30 albums as part of the famed guitar quartet The Romeros. He has played for Presidents Carter and Nixon, the Queen of the Netherlands, the Prince of Wales and Pope John Paul II. He has numerous international recording awards to his credit and has received an Honorary Doctorate in Music from University of Victoria.

His contributions to the field of classical guitar have inspired a number of distinguished composers to write works specifically for him, including Joaquín Rodrigo, Federico Moreno Torroba, Rev. Francisco de Madina, Lorenzo Palomo, Michael Zearott, Enrique Diemecke, and Celedonio Romero.

Pepe Romero is the second son of Celedonio Romero, who was his only guitar teacher. His first professional appearance was in a shared concert with his father when Pepe was only seven years old. In 1957 Celedonio Romero left Franco‘s Spain for the United States with his family.

On February 11, 2000, King Juan Carlos I of Spain knighted Pepe Romero and his brothers, Celin and Ángel, into the Order of “Isabel la Catolica.” The official ceremony of this high honor took place at the USC Thornton School of Music, and included a gala performance by The Romeros with the Thornton Chamber Orchestra. He is currently Adjunct Professor of Classical Guitar at the Thornton School, where he was named “Distinguished Artist in Residence” in 2004.[1][2]

Although originally a classical guitarist, he is talented in Flamenco and a popular Flamenco performer. His most famous Flamenco-only album is called ¡Flamenco Fenómeno!

The Romero Guitar Quartet

The Romero Guitar Quartet

Multi ani traiasca: corul caelestis Onesti “Sf. Apostoli Petru si Pavel”


This Day in the Yesteryear: DAY OF THE COLOMBIAN WOMAN (1967)


Day of the Colombian Woman (1967)

Not much is definitively known about Policarpa Salavarrieta‘s early years. Even her name is subject to conjecture. What is undisputed—and secured her a place in the annals of Colombian history and, in 1967, a day commemorating her heroism—is that she sacrificed her life trying to secure Colombia’s independence; she was executed on November 14, 1817, for her activities on behalf of the revolution. Aside from the day of remembrance, what other honors has the Colombian government accorded her? More… Discuss

 

“The Fifth Element” – Police scene: Police Nation (a possible “Near Future”)


 

CALIFORNIA WATCH–_–Map-_- Where have Oakland police officer-involved shootings occurred…Find out more here!


CALIFORNIA WATCH--_--Map-_- Where have Oakland police officer-involved shootings occurred...

CALIFORNIA WATCH–_–Map-_- Where have Oakland police officer-involved shootings occurred… (CURIOS? click to access site)

%d bloggers like this: