Tag Archives: Pregnancy

Preemies Slower to Pair Up Later in Life


Preemies Slower to Pair Up Later in Life

Studies have already suggested that babies born prematurely often grow up to be cautious individuals, and now, Finnish scientists have linked that tendency directly to love and sex. By comparing questionnaires from “preemies” now in their twenties with those filled out by peers born at full-term, the researchers found that preemies were 20 percent less likely to have ever lived with a significant other, and 24 percent less likely to be sexually active. Neonatologists, however, maintain that other factors, such as maternal income and education, are the best predictor of children’s future health and welfare. More… Discuss

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UC Davis MIND Institute Study Finds Association Between Maternal Exposure to Agricultural Pesticides, Autism in Offspring



UC Davis MIND Institute Study Finds Association Between Maternal Exposure to Agricultural Pesticides, Autism in Offspring
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mindinstitute.ucdavis.edu

Source: http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
The work was supported by grants from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences R01-ES015359, P01-ES011269 and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants R833292 and 829338. The study is available free of charge at:  http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/1307044/

Pregnancy Linked to Elevated Crash Risk


Pregnancy Linked to Elevated Crash Risk

Pregnant women may want to keep off the roads after learning this statistic: women in their second trimester are 42 percent more likely to be involved in a car crash that sends them to the hospital than they were prior to becoming pregnant. Why this is remains to be determined, but researchers suspect that the physical effects of pregnancy at this stage—fatigue, nausea, anxiety, mood fluctuations—can lead to distractedness behind the wheel. More… Discuss

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NEWS: LIFESTYLE CHANGES COULD CUT MISCARRIAGE RISK


Lifestyle Changes Could Cut Miscarriage Risk

Researchers say that more than a quarter of first-timemiscarriages are preventable and could be avoided if women made certain lifestyle changes. Heavy lifting,obesity, being underweight, alcohol consumption, and working night shifts during pregnancy were all found to be factors that elevate miscarriage risk. Age was also found to be a factor, with women in their mid-30s and above more likely to lose a pregnancy. It is important not only for individual women to be aware of these risks but also for policymakers and employers to know of them and help pregnant women avoid them whenever possible. More… Discuss

 

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American Diabetes Association _ Medicaid – Impact on the States


AmericanDiabetes Association _ Medicaid - Impact on the States

American Diabetes Association _ Medicaid - Impact on the States (click to read more from ADA)

 

For individuals with diabetes and prediabetes, access to adequate health insurance is critical to maintaining health, delaying onset of the disease and preventing complications associated with diabetes.

For nearly 3.5 million children, pregnant women, adults and seniors with diabetes, Medicaid provides vital and valuable access to care as families continue to cope with the difficult economic environment. (Source: http://www.diabetes.org/advocate/take-action/states/medicaids-impact-on-the.html?utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=Post&utm_content=091411-medicaid&utm_campaign=WWW)

Today In The News: Prenatal Pesticide Exposure Linked to Lower IQ


Prenatal Pesticide Exposure Linked to Lower IQ

Children whose mothers are exposed to high amounts of certain pesticides while pregnant appear to have lower intelligence quotients (IQs) than their peers when they reach school age. Three US studies have found that a child’s IQ tends to decrease in proportion to its mother’s exposure to organophosphates during pregnancy. While prenatal exposure to these pesticides was linked with childhood IQ, exposure after birth was not, suggesting that organophosphates are more damaging to developing fetuses than to children. More… Discuss