Tag Archives: Pulitzer Prize

this day in the yesteryear: First Pulitzer Prizes Awarded (1917)


First Pulitzer Prizes Awarded (1917)

The Pulitzer Prizes—prestigious awards presented annually by Columbia University for achievements in American journalism, literature, and music—were created by journalist and publisher Joseph Pulitzer, whose will funded the establishment of Columbia’s school of journalism as well as the prizes. Ironically, Columbia had rejected donation offers from Pulitzer during his lifetime because, as one of the originators of yellow journalism, he was regarded as unscrupulous. What do prizewinners receive? More… Discuss

Harper Lee to Publish Second Novel


Harper Lee to Publish Second Novel

Harper Lee has announced that she will publish her second novel in 2015, a sequel of sorts to her beloved, Pulitzer Prize-winning To Kill a Mockingbird. Lee completed the manuscript, titled Go Set a Watchman, in the 1950s, but her editor persuaded her to more fully explore the childhood of the book’s main character, Scout, which resulted in To Kill a Mockingbird—until now, her only novel. Lee, now 88, became reacquainted with the manuscript when her lawyer came upon it last year. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Norman Mailer (1923)


Norman Mailer (1923)

American writer Norman Mailer was catapulted to fame at 25 with the publication of The Naked and the Dead, a partially autobiographical novel based on his World War II service. He pioneered the use of novelistic techniques in nonfiction works, a style known as New Journalism, and won his first Pulitzer Prize in 1969 for The Armies of the Night. He won his second Pulitzer in 1980 with The Executioner’s Song, a novel depicting the events surrounding whose execution? More… Discuss

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
January 16

1547   Ivan IV crowns himself the new Czar of Russia in Assumption Cathedral in Moscow.
1786   The Council of Virginia guarantees religious freedom.
1847   John C. Fremont, the famed “Pathfinder” of Western exploration, is appointed governor of California.
1865   General William T. Sherman begins a march through the Carolinas.
1900   The U.S. Senate recognizes the Anglo-German Treaty of 1899 by which the UK renounced its rights to the Samoan Islands.
1909   One of Ernest Shackleton‘s polar exploration teams reaches the Magnetic South Pole.
1914   Maxim Gorky is authorized to return to Russia after an eight year exile for political dissidence.
1920   The League of Nations holds its first meeting in Paris.
1920   Allies lift the blockade on trade with Russia.
1939   Franklin D. Roosevelt asks for an extension of the Social Security Act to include more women and children.
1940   Hitler cancels an attack in the West due to bad weather and the capture of German attack plans in Belgium.
1942   Japan’s advance into Burma begins.
1944   Eisenhower assumes supreme command of the Allied Expeditionary Force in Europe.
1945   The U.S. First and Third armies link up at Houffalize, effectively ending the Battle of the Bulge.
1956   The Egyptian government makes Islam the state religion.
1965   Eighteen are arrested in Mississippi for the murder of three civil rights workers.
1975   The Irish Republican Army calls an end to a 25-day cease fire in Belfast.
1979   The Shah leaves Iran.
1991   The Persian Gulf War begins. The massive U.S.-led offensive against Iraq — Operation Desert Storm — ended on February 28, 1991, when President George Bush declared a cease-fire, and Iraq pledged to honor future coalition and U.N. peace terms.
Born on January 16
1757   Samuel McIntire, architect of Salem, Massachusetts.
1749   Vittorio Alfieri, Italian tragic poet (Cleopatra, Parigi shastigliata).
1821   John C. Breckinridge, 14th U.S. Vice President, Confederate Secretary of War.
1909   Ethel Merman, U.S. singer and actress, the “Queen of Broadway.”

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.jAbTuryQ.dpuf

quotation: Edith Wharton – “…habit is necessary;…”


quotation: 

Habit is necessary; it is the habit of having habits, of turning a trail into a rut, that must be incessantly fought against if one is to remain alive.

Edith Wharton (1862-1937) Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Gone with the Wind Published (1936)


Gone with the Wind Published (1936)

Gone with the Wind, a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novel by Margaret Mitchell, tells the story of a rebellious Georgia woman named Scarlett O’Hara. It presents a detailed view of her complex relationships with family and friends and her struggle to survive in the American South before, during, and after the Civil War. Many regard the book as having a strong ideological commitment to the cause of the Confederacy. Why was Mitchell’s book the subject of a 2001 court case? More… Discuss

Article: Neil Simon


Neil Simon

Simon is an American playwright whose popular comedies touch on various aspects of modern middle-class life. Despite being known as a master jokesmith, Simon often tackles serious topics. His Pulitzer Prize-winning Lost in Yonkers, for example, deals with the painful subject of parental rejection. His many other plays include The Odd Couple and Brighton Beach Memoirs. Many have been adapted into films, and Simon has written numerous screenplays. How did he get his start? More… Discuss

quotation: Edith Wharton: “Mrs. Ballinger is one of the ladies who pursue Culture in bands, as though it were dangerous to meet it alone.”


Mrs. Ballinger is one of the ladies who pursue Culture in bands, as though it were dangerous to meet it alone.

Edith Wharton (1862-1937) Discuss

“At the antipodes of bloggers everywhere! “

today’s birthday: Katharine Graham (1917)


Katharine Graham (1917)

Graham was publisher of The Washington Post from 1963 to 1979 and was at the helm when the paper played an integral role in breaking the Watergate scandal that led to US President Richard Nixon‘s resignation. One of the first women in the US to head a prestigious national newspaper, Graham had few female role models. She became a trailblazer for women in journalism and won a Pulitzer Prize for her autobiography, Personal History. How did she come to head up the Post? More…

today’s birthday: Gwendolyn Brooks (1917)


Gwendolyn Brooks (1917)

Brooks was an award-winning poet whose compositions, written in a variety of forms, deal with the experience of being black and often of being female in America. Her 1949 book of poetry, Annie Allen, received a Pulitzer Prize, the first ever awarded to an African American. In 1994, she was named the National Endowment for the Humanities Jefferson Lecturer, one of the highest honors in the American literary world. How old was Brooks when her first poem was published? More… Discuss

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QUOTATION: Willa Cather


Some memories are realities, and are better than anything that can ever happen to one again.

Willa Cather (1873-1947) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Mark Twain


Don’t tell fish stories where the people know you; but particularly, don’t tell them where they know the fish.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

 

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A Closer Look – ProPublica: Three Golden Ages of Journalism?


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A Closer Look – ProPublica.

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: SINCLAIR LEWIS (1885)


Sinclair Lewis (1885)

Probably the greatest satirist of his era, Lewis wrote novels that present a devastating picture of middle-class American life in the 1920s. His first literary successes were Main Street (1920), a merciless portrayal of Midwestern provincialism, and Babbitt (1922), an equally satiric portrait of a conformist businessman. Lewis refused a Pulitzer Prize in 1926, citing his objection to the idealized view of America espoused by the Pulitzer panel. What award did he accept in 1930? More… Discuss

 

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Great Composers/Compositions: GEORGE WALKER: “Lyric for Strings” (Original Version)


One of Walker’s best-known early works was “Lyric” for String Orchestra. It was originally the 2nd movement, ‘Molto Adagio,’ of his String Quartet No. 1 (1946), and is performed here in that original version.
The Son Sonora String Quartet: Ashley Horne and Airi Yoshioka, violins;
Liu-Wien Ting, viola; Leo Grinhauz, cello
from Albany TROY1082 (2009)
http://www.albanyrecords.com

Chamber works from this Pulitzer Prize winning composer.
Continuing Albany Records’ series of music by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer George Walker, this recording focuses on his chamber music. The music ranges from his first string quartet composed in 1946 to the piano sonata composed in 1985. Walker is the recipient of six honorary doctoral degrees and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and was inducted into the American Classical Music Hall of Fame in 2000.
Contents:
George Walker, composer
String Quartet No. 1
Son Sonora String Quartet
George Walker, composer
String Quartet No. 2
Son Sonora String Quartet
George Walker, composer
Piano Sonata No. 4
Frederick Moyer, piano
George Walker, composer
Songs
James Martin, baritone, George Walker, piano 
Review:
“The piano sonata is a stunning, spacious work. Walker is at his finest in the songs. Each one is a gem. …James Martin’s warm baritone, concise diction, and wide variety of colors are a perfect match for these songs.” (American Record Guide)
“From this CD one would conclude that [George Walker] is versatile, technically adept, and extremely skillful at changing styles…” (Fanfare)

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Great Performances: Wynton Marsalis – Johann Hummel Trumpet Concerto In Eb Major



As controversial as he is popular, Wynton Learson Marsalis is one of the most prominent jazz musicians of the modern era and is also a well-known instrumentalist in classical music.
Currently the Musical Director of Jazz at Lincoln Center Wynton Marsalis has received many awards for his musical proficiency. These awards run the gambit of Grammys to a controversial awarding of the Pulitzer Prize for Music for his three and half hour jazz oratorio CD box set Blood on the Fields, the first jazz album to win this award. Born in a musically oriented family in the New Orleans jazz scene at a young age Wynton was exposed to many legendary jazz musicians. Some of these musicians were Al Hirt, who gave Wynton his first trumpet when he was 6 years of age and Danny Barker, a legendary jazz banjoist who lead the Fairview Baptist Church band which Wynton was playing in when he was eight.
Wynton was very active musically during high school and was a member in many New Orleans musical organizations such as the N.O. symphony brass quintet, the N.O. community concert band, N.O. youth orchestra, N.O. symphony and a popular local funk band called the Creators.
In 1978 he had a two-year stay at the Juilliard School of Music before joining the Jazz Messengers to study under master drummer and bandleader, Art Blakey. Not long after that he toured with the Herbie Hancock quartet before forming his own band. After many concerts and workshops Wynton rekindled widespread interest in an art form that had been largely abandoned. He has invested his creative energy and status in being an advocate for a relatively small era in the history of jazz. His advocacy in this area has garnered much controversy for his “classicist” view of jazz history considering post-1965 avant-garde playing to be outside of jazz and 1970s fusion to be barren.
This viewpoint was promoted strongly in Ken Burns‘ documentary Jazz; a documentary Wynton was artistic director and co-producer. However despite his controversial views few disagree that his musical abilities in both jazz and classical music are high impressive and worthy of the high praise it often receives.

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Today’s Birthday: MARGUERITE HIGGINS (1920)


Marguerite Higgins (1920)

An American journalist, Higgins covered major world events, including the liberation of the Dachau concentration camp and the Nuremberg Trials, and was the first woman to win a Pulitzer Prize. While reporting on the Korean War, she was expelled from Korea by US General Walton Walker—who said the military had no time to prepare accommodations for women—but when she appealed to General Douglas MacArthur, the ban was lifted. Higgins’s life was cut short by a disease contracted while covering what? More… Discuss

 

Maple Leaf Rag: Scott Joplin


Publication of his “Maple Leaf Rag” in 1899 brought him fame and had a profound influence on subsequent writers of ragtime. It also brought the composer a steady income for life with royalties of one cent per sale, equivalent to 26 cents per sale in current value. During his lifetime, Joplin did not reach this level of success again and frequently had financial problems, which contributed to the loss of his first opera, A Guest of Honor. He continued to write ragtime compositions, and moved to New York in 1907. He attempted to go beyond the limitations of the musical form which made him famous, without much monetary success. His second opera, Treemonisha, was not received well at its partially staged performance in 1915. He died from complications of tertiary syphilis in 1917.

Joplin’s music was rediscovered and returned to popularity in the early 1970s with the release of a million-selling album of Joplin’s rags recorded by Joshua Rifkin, followed by the Academy Award–winning movie The Sting which featured several of his compositions, such as “The Entertainer“. The opera Treemonisha was finally produced in full to wide acclaim in 1972. In 1976, Joplin was posthumously awarded a Pulitzer Prize.
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scott_Joplin)

Today’s Birthday: John Hersey (1914)


John Hersey (1914)

Born in China to missionary parents, Hersey worked as a journalist in East Asia, Italy, and the Soviet Union from 1937 to 1946, including as a war correspondent during WWII. In 1944, he won the Pulitzer Prize for his novel A Bell for Adano, which depicts the Allied occupation of a Sicilian town. He later combined fact and fiction in his most famous work, Hiroshima, about the experiences of atomic-blast survivors. How did Hersey inspire Dr. Seuss to write The Cat in the Hat? More… Discuss

Today’s Birthday: Joseph Pulitzer (1847)


Joseph Pulitzer (1847)

Born in Hungary, Pulitzer immigrated to the US during the Civil War and served in the Union Army. He later became a reporter and purchased and founded several newspapers, establishing the pattern of the modern newspaper by combining investigative reporting with publicity stunts, self-advertising, and sensationalism. In his will, he established the Pulitzer Prizes, annual awards for achievements in American journalism, letters, and music. What famous saying about journalism is attributed to him? More… Discuss