Tag Archives: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky, Eugene Onegin, Op. 24, Act II Scene 1: Waltz (Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra, Ondrej Lenard, Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra)


Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky, Eugene Onegin, Op. 24, Act II Scene 1: Waltz

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great compositions/performances: Symphony No. 2 in C Minor, Op. 17 “Little Russian” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky


Symphony No. 2 in C Minor, Op. 17 “Little Russian” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

make music part of your llife series: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet – Fantasy Overture


P. I. Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 1 “Winter Daydreams” (Fedoseyev)


 

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 1 “Winter Daydreams” (Fedoseyev)

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Souvenir d’un lieu cher, Op. 42 – III. Mélodie (“Chant sans paroles”)


Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Souvenir d’un lieu cher, Op. 42 – III. Mélodie (“Chant sans paroles”)

Tchaikovsky – Sleeping Beauty – I. Pas d’action


Tchaikovsky – Sleeping Beauty – I. Pas d’action 

Pyotr Tchaikovsky – Souvenir de Florence ,great compositions/performances


Pyotr Tchaikovsky – Souvenir de Florence

Antonín Dvořák – Slavonic Dances, Op. 46


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Symphony No. 2 in C Minor, Op. 17 “Little Russian” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Royal Philharmonic Orchestra Yuri Temirkanov, conductor, great compositions/performances


Schumann: Pianotrio in g kl.t., op.110


Schumann: Pianotrio in g kl.t., op.110

Tchaikovsky – Suite No. 4 in G major “Mozartiana”, Op. 61 (FULL)


Tchaikovsky – Suite No. 4 in G major “Mozartiana“, Op. 61 (FULL)

Published on Apr 29, 2014

The Orchestral Suite No. 4, Op. 61, more commonly known as Mozartiana, is an orchestral suite by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, written in 1887 as a tribute to Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on the 100th anniversary of that composer’s opera Don Giovanni. Because this suite consists of four orchestrations of piano pieces by (or in one case, based on) Mozart, Tchaikovsky did not number this suite with his previous three suites for orchestra. Instead, he considered it a separate work entitled Mozartiana. Nevertheless, it is usually counted as No. 4 of his orchestral suites.

Tchaikovsky conducted the premiere himself, in Moscow in November 1887. It was the only one of his suites he conducted, and only the second at whose premiere he was present.

Pyotr Iliyich Tchaikovsky (May 7, 1840 — November 6, 1893) was a Russian composer of the Romantic era. His wide-ranging output includes symphonies, operas, ballets, instrumental, chamber music and songs. He wrote some of the most popular concert and theatrical music in the classical repertoire, including the ballets Swan Lake, The Sleeping Beauty and The Nutcracker, the 1812 Overture, his First Piano Concerto, his last three numbered symphonies, and the opera Eugene Onegin.

Born into a middle-class family, Tchaikovsky was educated for a career as a civil servant, despite his obvious musical precocity. He pursued a musical career against the wishes of his family, entering the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1862 and graduating in 1865. This formal, Western-oriented training set him apart from the contemporary nationalistic movement embodied by the influential group of young Russian composers known as The Five, with whom Tchaikovsky’s professional relationship was mixed.
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Mikhail Glinka – A Life for the Tsar – III. Waltz


Mikhail GlinkaA Life for the Tsar – III. Waltz

Bach Notebook for Anna Magdalena Concerto die liebe Minuet in G major, BWV114 , great compositions


Bach Notebook for Anna Magdalena Concerto die liebe Minuet in G major, BWV114

Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov,Symphonic Suite:”Antar” (Symphony No.2) , great compositions/performances


Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov,Symphonic Suite:”Antar” (Symphony No.2).


Rimsky-Korsakov – Russian Easter Festival Overture, Op. 36 (1888), played on period instruments

Borodin In the Steppes of Central Asia – Svetlanov , great compositions/performances


Borodin In the Steppes of Central Asia – Svetlanov

Tchaikovsky: 1812 Overture, Op. 49 Herbert Von Karajan & Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra , great compositions/performances



Tchaikovsky: 1812 Overture, Op. 49 Herbert Von Karajan & Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

Tchaikovsky: 1812 Overture, Op. 49 Herbert Von Karajan & Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra (1966)

Video made by Maarten Kroon @ Hollandsk Gjestehus in Vinstra (Norway) / Our guesthouse website link: http://www.hollandskgjestehus.com / Tel.: +47 61290045.
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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

 

 

Symphony No. 3 in D Major, Op. 29 “Polish” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, #Great compositions/performancers


Symphony No. 3 in D Major, Op. 29 “Polish” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Published on Feb 24, 2013

Symphony No. 3 in D Major, Op. 29 “Polish” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Composed in 1875

I. Introduzione e Allegro. Moderato assai (Tempo di marcia funebre) – Allegro brillante (0:00)
II. Alla tedesca. Allegro moderato e semplice – Trio (15:30)
III. Andante. Andante elegiaco (26:38)
IV. Scherzo. Allegro vivo – Trio (36:32)
V. Finale. Allegro con fuoco (Tempo di polacca) (42:42)

****Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
****Yuri Temirkanov, cond.
****Recorded in 1991
****http://www.amazon.com/6-Symphonies-P-…

****Image: Tchaikovsky (published 1906), courtesy Wikipedia

~

The purpose of this video is to foster a love of music. No copyright infringement of this recording is intended, but if you hold the copyright and would like this video removed, please let me know, and I will do so.

Tchaikovsky – Suite No. 4 in G major “Mozartiana”, Op. 61: great compositions/performances


Tchaikovsky – Suite No. 4 in G major “Mozartiana“, Op. 61

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy Piano Trio No 1 D Minor Op. 49: make music part of your life series


Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy Piano Trio No 1 D Minor Op. 49

Rimsky Korsakov – Dance Of The Tumblers -: make music pat of your life series


Rimsky Korsakov – Dance Of The Tumblers –

Rimsky-Korsakov – Mlada Suite, Procession of the Nobles – Svetlanov,: great compositions/performances


Rimsky-Korsakov – Mlada Suite, Procession of the Nobles – Svetlanov

Carl Maria von Weber, Konzertstück f-moll für Klavier und Orchester, Op.79. Alfred Brendel & London Symphony Orchestra: great compositions/performances


Carl Maria von Weber, Konzertstück f-moll für Klavier und Orchester, Op.79. Alfred Brendel & LSO

Barbirolli – Arensky: Variations on a Theme by Tchaikovsky,: great compositions/performances


[embes]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRKiE8o3NQU[/embed]

Barbirolli – Arensky: Variations on a Theme by Tchaikovsky (improved sound)

Sviatoslav Richter plays Rachmaninoff Concerto No.1, Op. 1: great compositions/performances


Sviatoslav Richter plays Rachmaninov Concerto No.1, Op.1

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 6 “Pathetique”, Op. 74 (Fedoseyev),: great compositions/performances


P. I. TchaikovskySymphony No. 6 “Pathetique”, Op. 74 (Fedoseyev)

Rimsky-Korsakov – Christmas Eve: Orchestral Suite (1895): Great compositions/performances


Rimsky-Korsakov – Christmas Eve: Orchestral Suite (1895)

Alexander Borodin In The Steppes Of Central Asia: make music part of your life series


Smetana: Má Vlast: Vltava (Die Moldau) – gesamt: great compositions/performances


Smetana: Má Vlast: Vltava (Die Moldau) – gesamt

None but the Lonely Heart – Pyotr Tchaikovsky, make music part of your life series


None but the Lonely Heart – Pyotr Tchaikovsky

Tchaikovsky String Quartet Op. 11 – II. Andante cantabile (Kontras Quartet): great compositions/performances


Pyotr Tchaikovsky – String Quartet No 1 in D Major, op.11: great compositions/performances


Pyotr Tchaikovsky – String Quartet No 1 in D Major, op.11

Daniil Trifonov – Glazunov Piano Concerto No 2 in B major: great compositions/performances


Daniil Trifonov – Glazunov Piano Concerto No 2 in B major

Symphony No. 3 in D Major, Op. 29 “Polish” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: great compositions/performances


Symphony No. 3 in D Major, Op. 29 “Polish” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Svetlanov conducts Tchaikovsky – Capriccio italien, Op. 45: great compositions/performances


Svetlanov conducts Tchaikovsky – Capriccio italien, Op. 45

Éléonore Darmon et Éric Astoul jouent Tchaikovsky “Souvenir d’un Lieu Cher” op. 42: make music part of your life series


Éléonore Darmon et Éric Astoul jouent TchaikovskySouvenir d’un Lieu Cher” op. 42 

Tchaikovsky-Violin Concerto in D Major Op. 35: Great compositions/performances


Tchaikovsky-Violin Concerto in D Major Op. 35 (Complete)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
 

The Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35, was written by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky in 1878. It is one of the best known violin concertos, and is considered one of the most technically difficult works for the violin.

Tchaikovsky.gif

Composition

Tchaikovsky (right) with violinist Iosif Kotek

The piece was written in Clarens, a Swiss resort on the shores of Lake Geneva, where Tchaikovsky had gone to recover from the depression brought on by his disastrous marriage to Antonina Miliukova. He was working on his Piano Sonata in G major but finding it heavy going. Presently he was joined there by his composition pupil, the violinist Iosif Kotek, who had been in Berlin for violin studies with Joseph Joachim. The two played works for violin and piano together, including a violin-and-piano arrangement of Édouard Lalo‘s Symphonie espagnole, which they may have played through the day after Kotek’s arrival. This work may have been the catalyst for the composition of the concerto.[1] He wrote to his patroness Nadezhda von Meck, “It [the Symphonie espagnole] has a lot of freshness, lightness, of piquant rhythms, of beautiful and excellently harmonized melodies…. He [Lalo], in the same way as Léo Delibes and Bizet, does not strive after profundity, but he carefully avoids routine, seeks out new forms, and thinks more about musical beauty than about observing established traditions, as do the Germans.”[2] Tchaikovsky authority Dr. David Brown writes that Tchaikovsky “might almost have been writing the prescription for the violin concerto he himself was about to compose.”[3]

Tchaikovsky made swift, steady progress on the concerto, as by this point in his rest cure he had regained his inspiration, and the work was completed within a month despite the middle movement getting a complete rewrite (a version of the original movement was preserved as the first of the three pieces for violin and piano, Souvenir d’un lieu cher).[4] Since Tchaikovsky was not a violinist, he sought the advice of Kotek on the completion of the solo part.[5] “How lovingly he’s busying himself with my concerto!” Tchaikovsky wrote to his brother Anatoly on the day he completed the new slow movement. “It goes without saying that I would have been able to do nothing without him. He plays it marvelously.”[6]

Luigi Boccherini – String Quintet in E maj Opus 11 No 5 G275: make music part of your life series


Luigi BoccheriniString Quintet in E maj Opus 11 No 5 G275

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev) Erudite Music Channel: make music part of your life series


P. I. TchaikovskySerenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev)

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev): make music part of your life series


P. I. TchaikovskySerenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev)

Aleksandr Glazunov: Symphony no.6 op.58 (Gennadij Rozhdestvenskij, conductor): make music part of your life series


Aleksandr Glazunov: Symphony no.6 op.58 (Gennadij Rozhdestvenskij, conductor)

Parts/Movements

  1. Adagio – Allegro passionato
  2. Tema con varazioni
  3. Intermezzo. Allegretto
  4. Finale. Andante maestoso

Review :

While the Symphony No. 6 in C minor, Op. 58, of 1896 by Alexander Glazunov is not the most personally characteristic of his eight completed symphonies — the optimistic Third or the Olympian Fifth are more typical of his confident symphonic aesthetic — it is arguably the most typically Russian of his symphonies. Part of the reason for this is the scoring — violins in octaves above massed brass at its climaxes à la Tchaikovsky and gorgeously colorful woodwind writing in its central movements — part of it is the themes — ardent and powerful with a yearning quality characteristic of fin de siècle Russian symphonies — but most of it is the furious tone of the opening movement.
******With the darkly unfolding Adagio leading into a Allegro appassionato that balances a passionately despairing first theme with a fervently supplicating second theme, Glazunov’s Sixth sounds like a Russian symphony composed after the death of Tchaikovsky. But the Sixth is more than the work of a symphonic epigone. While the tone of the opening movement sounds typically Russian, its chromatic melodic and cogent harmonic structure makes it sound much more modern than contemporary symphonies by Kalinnikov or even Rachmaninov. Even more modern are the Sixth’s second and fourth movements.
******The second movement is a theme and seven variations that slowly transmutes the tone of the symphony from the fury of the opening movement to one of calm acceptance.
******The brief third-movement Intermezzo that precedes the Finale is lighter in tone than anything else in the symphony.
******The Finale itself is one of Glazunov’s most successful closing movements. With its magisterial Andante maestoso introduction announcing the chorale theme that will ultimately cap the movement, its highly contrasted themes — the first confidently striding in the winds Moderato maestoso, the second a lilting Scherzando theme for the flutes, horns, and strings — the Finale seems at first too episodic to cohere. Glazunov’s superb technical skills, however, form all the Finale’s material into an organic whole and the tone of the Finale — powerfully positive — is altogether Glazunov’s own. ~ James Leonard, Rovi

Read more:
               http://www.answers.com/topic/symphony-no-6-in-c-minor-op-58#ixzz3AkekJ1oA

               http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/artists/5a0988a4-695c-4bff-bc68-4f312427495e.html
              http://www.allmusic.com/composition/symphony-no-6-in-c-minor-op-58-mc0002366895

 

Tchaikovsky-Meditation from Souvenir d’un lieu cher op. 42 no. 1 (Orchestrated by A. Glazunov): great compositions/performances



From: Kanaal van viool7  Kanaal van viool7

Tchaikovsky-Meditation from Souvenir d’un lieu cher op. 42 no. 1 (Orchestrated by A. Glazunov)

Tchaikovsky's tomb at the Alexander Nevsky Mon...

Tchaikovsky’s tomb at the Alexander Nevsky Monastery (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

*****Isaac Stern: violin-
*****National Symphony Orchestra-Mstislav                 Rostropovich: conductor-1977

 

Symphony No. 1 in G Minor, Op. 13 “Winter Dreams” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: make music part of your life series


Symphony No. 1 in G Minor, Op. 13 “Winter Dreams” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

FROM

Peter Tchaikovsky: Variations on a Rococo Theme Op 33 (make music part of your life series)


[youtube.com/watch?v=NSCslGqxCVQ]
Peter Tchaikovsky: Variations on a Rococo Theme Op 33
DIMITRI MASLENNIKOV (cello),
Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester, Berlin
CHRISTOPH ESCHENBACH (conductor)

great compositions/performancesTchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture | Valery Gergiev, London Symphony Orchestra


[youtube.com/watch?v=ZxOtYNf-eWE]

Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture | Valery Gergiev, London Symphony Orchestra

Published by  Adagietto on Jan 13, 2013/ 108,521 views

From Adagietto:
Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, fantasy-overture for orchestra in B minor, 1880. Maestro Valery Gergiev with the London Symphony Orchestra.

Numerous composers have responded to Shakespeare’s timeless drama of forbidden and youthful love, but Tchaikovsky’s response (along with Berlioz’s and Prokofiev’s) is at the top of the list. It is the only one of the three to be intended as a number in a symphony concert, and, hence is by default the most famous of the lot.

Tchaikovsky, a lawyer, was still developing as a composer at age 29 when Mily Balakirev (self-appointed father figure to Russian composers) persuaded him to write an orchestral work on the subject of the “star-cross’d lovers.” Balakirev outlined the form, planned the keys, and even suggested some of the actual music. After the 1870 premiere, he convinced Tchaikovsky to revise it. The work’s success in this form did much to transform the composer’s tendency toward crippling doubt into useful self-criticism. (Not that the transformation was ever total; Tchaikovsky suffered bouts of depression and self-doubt throughout his career.) The composer revised it again in 1880; this version is almost universally the one played. While the final version is probably the best one, the 1869 text is also a fine work and very much worth hearing. The earlier version begins with a charming tune that carries elements of the great love theme. In the first and second revisions Tchaikovsky eliminated this and replaced it with the benedictory theme representing Friar Laurence. The effect of this change on the overture’s structure is large. The first version seems to begin with Juliet still in a relatively childlike state, but with the potential for the great love present in the disguised premonitions of the love theme. The focus is, therefore, on the development of the drama as it unfolds. The later versions, beginning as it were with a prayer, seem to invite the hearer to look back on a tragedy that has already happened. Both versions proceed identically through depictions of the clashes between the houses of Montague and Capulet, and then unveil the great love music. After that, though, Tchaikovsky’s original idea seems to this writer to be superior: There is a great development, fugal-sounding and allowing for contrapuntal conflict based on the overture’s main rhythms and themes. It is tremendously exciting, more so than the music which replaced it. Justification for dropping it might be made along the lines that the original version has too much dramatic weight and overshadows the rest of the music. The main differences thereafter are in details of scoring, and in the finale, which in the original version is much too curt.

It is often instructive to see what a great composer has done at two different times with the same ideas and material. Whether or not it has greater musical merit, Tchaikovsky’s blessing of his final version served to ensure that it is the one that prevailed, and in that form it is accepted as one of the greatest programmatic pieces in the symphonic repertoire. The yearning love theme, in particular, is universally acknowledged as one of the greatest melodies ever written, while the exciting fight music and Tchaikovsky’s unfailingly clear and imaginative orchestration carry the listener through with hardly a misstep. But the original version is not far behind it in musical worth; it should be given more frequent revivals, if only for the sake of hearing the great fugato passage described above.

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Romeo und Julia, Romeo y Julieta, Roméo et Juliette, Romeo e Giulietta, Romeo en Julia, Romeu e Julieta, Romeo and Juliet, Romeu i Julieta, Romeo a Juliet, Romeo og Julie, Romeo kaj Julieta, Romeo i Julija, Romeo e Xulieta, Romeo dan Julia, Rómeó és Júlia, Romeo și Julieta, Romeowan Juliet, Romeo dhe Xhuljeta, Romeo ja Julia, Romeo och Julia, Romeo at Julieta, Romeo un Džuljeta

Visit  this site for many more wonderful unique musical moments! I suscribed to this channel  Adagietto

great compositions/performances: Barbirolli – Arensky: Variations on a Theme by Tchaikovsky (improved sound)


[youtube.com/watch?v=tRKiE8o3NQU]

Barbirolli – Arensky: Variations on a Theme by Tchaikovsky

London Symphony Orchestra
Recorded in 1947

John Barbirolli in the mid-1960s

John Barbirolli in the mid-1960s (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

John Barbirolli
Born: 12/2/1899 – Holborn, London, England
Died: 7/29/1970 – London, England

Anton Stepanovich Arensky (Russian: Антон Степанович Аренский) (12 July 1861 — 25 February 1906), was a Russian composer of Romantic classical music, a pianist and a professor of music.

Anton Arensky, 1895

Anton Arensky, 1895

Arensky was born in Novgorod, Russia. He was musically precocious and had composed a number of songs and piano pieces by the age of nine. With his mother and father, he moved to Saint Petersburg in 1879, where he studied composition at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory with Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. After graduating from the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1882, Arensky became a professor at the Moscow Conservatory. Among his students there were Alexander Scriabin, Sergei Rachmaninoff and Alexander Gretchaninov. In 1895 Arensky returned to Saint Petersburg as the director of the Imperial Choir, a post for which he had been recommended by Mily Balakirev. Arensky retired from this position in 1901, spending his remaining time as a pianist, conductor, and composer. Arensky died of tuberculosis in a sanatorium in Perkjärvi, Finland. It is alleged that drinking and gambling undermined his health.

Pyotr Tchaikovsky was the greatest influence on Arensky’s musical compositions. Indeed, Rimsky-Korsakov said, “In his youth Arensky did not escape some influence from me; later the influence came from Tchaikovsky. He will quickly be forgotten.” The perception that he lacked a distinctive personal style contributed to long-term neglect of his music, though in recent years a large number of his compositions have been recorded. Especially popular are the orchestral Variations on a Theme of Tchaikovsky based on one of Tchaikovsky’s Songs for Children, Op. 54.

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make music part of your life series: S.Riсhter plays P.Tchaikovsky L’espiegle, Op.72


[youtube.com/watch?v=LX-I89T-MEM]
make music part of your life series:  S.Riсhter plays P.Tchaikovsky L’espiegle, Op.72

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Rimsky Korsakov – Dance Of The Tumblers – (What a tremendous amount of energy!)


[youtube.com/watch?v=KVIB3T2Q-sY]

Rimsky Korsakov – Dance Of The Tumblers –

Please remember to visit http://www.youtube.com/user/shreddeds… and sign her petition.

Rimsky Korakov A lively classical instrumental, this recording made in the late 70s.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Edvard Grieg – Norwegian Dances, Op. 35 – III. Allegro moderato alla marcia



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Make Music PArt of Your Life: Pyotr Tchaikovsky – Souvenir de Florence



The String Sextet in D minor “Souvenir de Florence“, Op. 70, is a string sextet scored for 2 violins, 2 violas, and 2 cellos composed in the European summer of 1890 by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Tchaikovsky dedicated the work to the St. Petersburg Chamber Music Society in response to his becoming an Honorary Member. The work, in the traditional four-movement form, was titled “Souvenir de Florence” because the composer sketched one of the work’s principal themes while visiting Florence, Italy, where he composed The Queen of Spades. The work was revised between December 1891 and January 1892, before being premiered in 1892.

1. Allegro con spirito (00:00)
2. Adagio cantabile e con moto (10:16)
3. Allegretto moderato (19:56)
4. Allegro con brio e vivace (26:11)

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