Tag Archives: Queen Victoria

Abide with me Hymn, Henry Francis Lyte


Abide With Me Hymn – Gods Country

story: Windsor Castle


English: Photograph of Windsor castle showing ...

English: Photograph of Windsor castle showing visitors. Taken Summer 1989 by contributor. All rights waived. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Windsor Castle

Located in the county of Berkshire, west of London, Windsor Castle has been a principal official residence of British monarchs since the 11th century. The Queen herself is quite fond of Windsor and frequently weekends there. Windsor has the distinction of being the oldest and largest occupied castle in the world. The modern castle, which contains about 1,000 rooms and occupies 13 acres (5 hectares), consists of three “wards”—the upper, middle, and lower. What damaged more than 100 rooms in 1992? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Queen Elizabeth I of England (1533)


Queen Elizabeth I of England (1533)

Queen Elizabeth, England‘s last Tudor monarch, came to the throne during a turbulent period in the nation’s history. Although she has been described as vain, miserly, and fickle, she was remarkably successful as queen. During her reign, England pursued a policy of expansionism in commerce and geographical exploration, defeating the Spanish Armada and becoming a major world power. Literature and the arts flourished during the period as well. To whom was the Queen married? More… Discuss

Philately


Philately

Philately is the collection and study of postage stamps and of materials relating to their history. People began collecting postage stamps soon after the first one was issued in 1840, and the scholarly study of stamps—their history and details like watermarks, perforations, and cancellations—followed within decades. Though their primary purpose is to provide proof of postage payment, stamps also serve as a sort of historic record. What was philately called before the term was coined in 1864? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Queen Victoria Ascends British Throne (1837)


Queen Victoria Ascends British Throne (1837)

Queen Victoria ruled the UK for more than 63 years, longer than any other British monarch. Her reign, known as the Victorian Era, coincided with the height of the Industrial Revolution and was marked by significant social, economic, and technological changes in the UK. Though the Irish Potato Famine adversely affected Victoria’s popularity, she was mostly well liked. She was a carrier of the hereditary illness later dubbed the “royal disease.” What is the disease called today? More… Discuss

TODAY’S HOLIDAY: Benjamin Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield


Primrose Day

Benjamin Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield, novelist, and twice prime minister of England, died on this day in 1881. When he was buried in the family vault at Hughenden Manor, near High Wycombe, Queen Victoria came to lay a wreath ofprimroses—thought to be his favorite flower—on his grave. Two years later, the Primrose League was formed to support the principles of Conservatism that Disraeli had championed. The organization’s influence ebbed after World War I, but Primrose Day is remembered in honor of Disraeli and his contribution to the Conservative cause. More… Discuss

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ARTICLE: MAKEUP: FROM KOHL TO COSMECEUTICALS


Makeup: From Kohl to Cosmeceuticals

Cosmetics have been used for millennia to simulate or enhance the appearance of youthfulness, health, and beauty—eye makeup and scented creams were used by the ancient Egyptians as early as the 4th millennium BCE—but they have not always been viewed favorably. In the 19th century, for example, Queen Victoria publicly declared the use of makeup by anyone other than actors to be improper and vulgar. Today, however, the cosmetics industry is thriving. How much is spent on cosmetics each year? More…Discuss

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: COMMONWEALTH DAY


Commonwealth Day

From 1903 until 1957, this holiday in honor of the British Empire was known as Empire Day and celebrated on May 24, Queen Victoria‘s birthday. Between 1958 and 1966, it was called British Commonwealth Day. Then it was switched to Queen Elizabeth II‘s official birthday in June, and the name was shortened to Commonwealth Day. It is now observed annually on the second Monday in March. In Canada it is still celebrated on May 24 (or the Monday before) and referred to as Victoria Day. More… Discuss

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Felix Mendelssohn – Songs without Words – Op.53, No.1



Felix MendelssohnSongs without Words – Op.53, No.1
András Schiff
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IN THE YESTERYEAR: QUEEN VICTORIA CREATES THE VICTORIA CROSS (1856)


Queen Victoria Creates the Victoria Cross (1856)

Queen Victoria created the Victoria Cross—the highest British military award for valor—on January 29, 1856, in the late stages of the Crimean War. The impetus for a new medal arose during the war—one of the first with modern reporting—as correspondents documented many acts of bravery by British servicemen that went unrewarded. Thus, Victoria instituted her eponymous award for acts of devotion and valor in the presence of the enemy. From what was the Victoria Cross originally made? More…Discuss

 

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Today’s Birthday: Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll (1848)


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Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll (1848)

In 1840, Queen Victoria married her first cousin, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, and the two had nine children, whose marriages, and those of their grandchildren, in turn, allied the British royal house with those of Russia, Germany, Greece, Denmark, Romania, and others. Their sixth child, Princess Louise, is regarded by biographers as the couple’s most beautiful daughter. In 1871, Louise married the Marquess of Lorne and became the Duchess of Argyll. Why was the marriage controversial? More… Discuss