Tag Archives: recording industry association of america

Great Compositions/Performances: Leontyne Price, 1962: Swing Low, Sweet Chariot – RCA Victor LM-2600


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Leontyne Price, 1962: Swing Low, Sweet Chariot – RCA Victor LM-2600

Digitized from the LP shown above, issued on the RCA Victor Red Seal label, catalogue number LM-2660.

Swing low, sweet chariot
Coming for to carry me home
Swing low, sweet chariot
Coming for to carry me home

I looked over Jordan and what did I see
Coming for to carry me home
A band of angels coming after me
Coming for to carry me home

If you get there before I do
Coming for to carry me home
Tell all my friends I’m coming too
Coming for to carry me home

“Swing Low, Sweet Chariot” is a historic American Negro spiritual. The earliest known recording was in 1909, by the Fisk Jubilee Singers of Fisk University. It is also the anthem of the English Rugby team. In 2002, the Library of Congress honored the song as one of 50 recordings chosen that year to be added to the National Recording Registry. It was also included in the list of Songs of the Century, by the Recording Industry Association of America and the National Endowment for the Arts. “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot” was written by Wallis Willis, a Choctaw freedman in the old Indian Territory in what is now Choctaw County, near the County seat of Hugo, Oklahoma sometime before 1862. He was inspired by the Red River, which reminded him of the Jordan River and of the Prophet Elijah’s being taken to heaven by a chariot (2 Kings 2:11). Many sources claim that this song and “Steal Away” (also composed by Willis) had lyrics that referred to the Underground Railroad, the resistance movement that helped slaves escape from the South to the North and Canada. Alexander Reid, a minister at the Old Spencer Academy, Choctaw boarding school, heard Willis singing these two songs and transcribed the words and melodies. He sent the music to the Jubilee Singers of Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee. The Jubilee Singers popularized the songs during a tour of the United States and Europe. The song enjoyed a resurgence during the 1960s Civil Rights struggle and the folk revival; it was performed by a number of artists. Perhaps the most famous performance during this period was that by Joan Baez during the legendary 1969 Woodstock festival.

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot est une chanson de type Negro spiritual qui vient des États-Unis. La chanson a également un lien important avec l’équipe d’Angleterre de rugby à XV et elle est régulièrement chantée lors des matches de cette équipe.

“Swing Low, Sweet Chariot” on yhdysvaltalainen hymni, jonka choctaw-intiaani Wallis Willis sävelsi ennen vuotta 1862.

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot è uno storico brano musicale spiritual nero, inciso per la prima volta dai Fisk Jubilee Singers nel 1909. Nel 2002 la Biblioteca del Congresso ha inserito il brano tra le 50 canzoni del National Recording Registry. È stato inoltre inserito nella lista delle Songs of the Century dalla RIAA e dal Sovvenzionamento Nazionale per le Arti e la Ricerca.

 

 

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The Doors – Light My Fire



Light My Fire” is a song originally performed by The Doors which was recorded in August 1966 and released the first week of January 1967. It spent three weeks at #1 on the Billboard’s Hot 100, and one week on the Cashbox Top 100. It was re-released in 1968, peaking at #87. The song was largely written by Robby Krieger, and credited to the entire band. A live version was released in 1983 on their album Alive, She Cried, the first of several live or compilation albums released in subsequent decades to include the song.

“Light My Fire” also achieved modest success in Australia, where it peaked at #22 on the ARIA chart. The single originally reached #49 in the UK in 1967, but experienced belated success in that country in 1991 when a re-issue peaked at #7. The re-issue occurred on the back of revived interest in the band following Oliver Stone‘s film biopic “The Doors”. The single has been certified in 1967 a gold by the Recording Industry Association of America.

The song is #35 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.It was also included in the Songs of the Century list and was ranked number 7 in VH1’s 100 Greatest Songs of All Time list.

 

The Eagles Hotel California [Remastered] 01 Hotel California


“Hotel California

On a dark desert highway, cool wind in my hair
Warm smell of colitas, rising up through the air
Up ahead in the distance, I saw a shimmering light
My head grew heavy and my sight grew dim
I had to stop for the night
There she stood in the doorway;
I heard the mission bell
And I was thinking to myself,
“This could be Heaven or this could be Hell
Then she lit up a candle and she showed me the way
There were voices down the corridor,
I thought I heard them sayWelcome to the Hotel California
Such a lovely place (Such a lovely place)
Such a lovely face
Plenty of room at the Hotel California
Any time of year (Any time of year)
You can find it here

Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends
She got a lot of pretty, pretty boys she calls friends
How they dance in the courtyard, sweet summer sweat.
Some dance to remember, some dance to forget

So I called up the Captain,
“Please bring me my wine”
He said, “We haven’t had that spirit here since nineteen sixty nine”
And still those voices are calling from far away,
Wake you up in the middle of the night
Just to hear them say…

Welcome to the Hotel California
Such a lovely place (Such a lovely place)
Such a lovely face
They livin’ it up at the Hotel California
What a nice surprise (what a nice surprise)
Bring your alibis

Mirrors on the ceiling,
The pink champagne on ice
And she said “We are all just prisoners here, of our own device”
And in the master’s chambers,
They gathered for the feast
They stab it with their steely knives,
But they just can’t kill the beast

Last thing I remember, I was
Running for the door
I had to find the passage back
To the place I was before
Relax, ” said the night man,
“We are programmed to receive.
You can check-out any time you like,
But you can never leave! ”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:  

“Hotel California” topped the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart for one week in May 1977 and peaked at number ten on the Adult Contemporary charts. Three months after its release, the single was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), representing one million copies shipped. The Eagles also won the 1977 Grammy Award for Record of the Year for “Hotel California” at the 20th Grammy Awards in 1978.[3]

 

In 2009, the song “Hotel California” was certified Platinum (Digital Sales Award) by the RIAA for sales of one million digital downloads.[4]

 

The lyrics weave a surrealistic tale in which a weary traveler checks into a luxury hotel. The hotel at first appears inviting and tempting, but it turns out to be a nightmarish place where “you can check out anytime you like, but you can never leave”. The song is an allegory about hedonism, self-destruction, and greed in the music industry of the late 1970s.[9] Don Henley called it “our interpretation of the high life in Los Angeles[10] and later reiterated: “It’s basically a song about the dark underbelly of the American dream and about excess in America, which is something we knew a lot about.”[11] In 2008,Don Felder described the origins of the lyrics:

 

Don Henley and Glenn wrote most of the words. All of us kind of drove into L.A. at night. Nobody was from California, and if you drive into L.A. at night… you can just see this glow on the horizon of lights, and the images that start running through your head of Hollywood and all the dreams that you have, and so it was kind of about that… what we started writing the song about. Coming into L.A…. and from that ‘Life in the Fast Lane’ came out of it, and ‘Wasted Time’ and a bunch of other songs.[12]

 

The term “colitas” in the first stanza means “little tails” in Spanish; in Mexican slang it refers to buds of the cannabis (marijuana) plant.[13]

 

In a 2009 interview, The Plain Dealer music critic John Soeder asked Don Henley this about the lyrics:

 

On “Hotel California,” you sing: “So I called up the captain / ‘Please bring me my wine’ / He said, ‘We haven’t had that spirit here since 1969.'” I realize I’m probably not the first to bring this to your attention, but wine isn’t a spirit. Wine is fermented; spirits are distilled. Do you regret that lyric?

 

Henley responded:

 

Thanks for the tutorial and, no, you’re not the first to bring this to my attention—and you’re not the first to completely misinterpret the lyric and miss the metaphor. Believe me, I’ve consumed enough alcoholic beverages in my time to know how they are made and what the proper nomenclature is. But that line in the song has little or nothing to do with alcoholic beverages. It’s a sociopolitical statement. My only regret would be having to explain it in detail to you, which would defeat the purpose of using literary devices in songwriting and lower the discussion to some silly and irrelevant argument about chemical processes.[14]

 

According to Glenn Frey‘s liner notes for The Very Best Of, the use of the word “steely” in the lyric, “They stab it with their steely knives, but they just can’t kill the beast,” was a playful nod to band Steely Dan, who had included the lyric “Turn up the Eagles, the neighbors are listening” in their song “Everything You Did“.[15]

 

 

This day In Yesteryear: MILES DAVIS’S KIND OF BLUE IS RELEASED (1959)


 

Miles Davis’s Kind of Blue Is Released (1959)

Recorded in just two sessions in the spring of 1959, Miles Davis’sKind of Blue is widely considered to be one of the most important jazz albums ever produced. Davis assembled a group of talented musicians—including saxophonist John Coltrane and pianist Bill Evans—and gave them minimal instructions before recording. Possibly the best-selling jazz album of all time, Kind of Blue is notable for having left out something considered to be the backbone of earlier jazz composition—what? More… Discuss

Mile Davis – Kind Of Blue Full Album Concert Full HD Kind of Blue is a studio album by American jazz musician Miles Davis, released August 17, 1959, on Columbia Records in the United States. High Quality Sound Audio FLAC Which Preserve Quality of Original Uncompressed Audio Sound Recording sessions for the album took place at Columbia’s 30th Street Studio in New York City on March 2 and April 22, 1959. The sessions featured Davis’s ensemble sextet, which consisted of pianist Bill Evans (Wynton Kelly on one track), drummer Jimmy Cobb, bassist Paul Chambers, and saxophonists John Coltrane and Julian “Cannonball” Adderley.
After the entry of Bill Evans into his sextet, Davis followed up on the modal experimentations of Milestones (1958) and 1958 Miles (1958) by basing the album entirely on modality, in contrast to his earlier work with the hard bop style of jazz. Though precise figures have been disputed, Kind of Blue has been described by many music writers not only as Davis’s best-selling album, but as the best-selling jazz record of all time. On October 7, 2008, it was certified quadruple platinum in sales by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). It has been regarded by many critics as the greatest jazz album of all time and Davis’s masterpiece.
The album’s influence on music, including jazz, rock, and classical music, has led music writers to acknowledge it as one of the most influential albums ever made. In 2002, it was one of fifty recordings chosen that year by the Library of Congress to be added to the National Recording Registry. In 2003, the album was ranked number 12 on Rolling Stone magazine‘s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.
Accolades
Kind of Blue has been cited by writers and music critics as the greatest jazz album of all time and has been ranked at or near the top of numerous “best album” lists in disparate genres. In 2002, Kind of Blue was one of 50 recordings chosen that year by the Library of Congress to be added to the National Recording Registry.In selecting the album as number 12 on its list of the 500 greatest albums of all time, Rolling Stone magazine stated “This painterly masterpiece is one of the most important, influential and popular albums in jazz”. On December 16, 2009, the United States House of Representatives passed a resolution honoring the fiftieth anniversary of Kind of Blue and “reaffirming jazz as a national treasure”. It is included in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die, described by reviewer Seth Jacobson as “a genre-defining moment in twentieth-century music, period.”
Track listing
All songs written and composed by Miles Davis except where noted (see content section for more information). Only six complete takes of the five songs on the album exist:. 
No. Title Length
1. “So What” 9:22
2. “Freddie Freeloader” 9:46
3. “Blue in Green” (Miles Davis and Bill Evans) 5:37
4. “All Blues” 11:33
5. “Flamenco Sketches” (Miles Davis and Bill Evans) 9:26
Reissue bonus track
No. Title Length
6. “Flamenco Sketches (Alternate take)” 9:32
Tracks 1, 2 and 3 (side one on the original vinyl release) recorded March 2, 1959; tracks 4 and 5 (side two) recorded April 22, 1959. All tracks recorded at Columbia 30th Street Studio, New York City.
Personnel

Musicians
Miles Davis — trumpet, band leader
Julian “Cannonball” Adderley — alto saxophone, except on “Blue in Green”
Paul Chambers — double bass
Jimmy Cobb — drums
John Coltrane — tenor saxophone
Bill Evans — piano (except “Freddie Freeloader”), liner notes
Wynton Kelly — piano on “Freddie Freeloader”
Production
Michael Cuscuna — reissue production
Don Hunstein — photography
Teo Macero — production
Jay Maisel — cover photo
Fred Plaut — recording engineering
Irving Townsend — production
Mark Wilder — remix engineer
Nat Hentoff — liner notes

Chart positions
Billboard Music Charts (North America)
1977: Jazz Albums — #37
1987: Top Jazz Albums — #10
2001: Top Internet Albums — #14