Tag Archives: Red blood cell

today’s birthday: Sir Ronald Ross (1857)


Sir Ronald Ross (1857)

Born and raised in India, English physician Ronald Ross joined the Indian Medical Service after completing medical school and undertook the study of malaria, then a disease that was not well understood. After years of research, he demonstrated the malarial parasite, Plasmodium, in the stomach of the Anopheles mosquito, identifying the disease’s mechanism of transmission. His discoveries earned him a Nobel Prize in 1902. When is World Mosquito Day, instituted by Ross, observed? More… Discuss

Blood Type


Blood Type

Human blood is classified according to the presence or absence of specific markers, called antigens, on the surface of red blood cells. The most commonly encountered blood group system is the ABO system, which classifies blood based on the presence or absence of two antigens, A and B. There are four blood types in this grouping, A, B, AB, and O. Type AB indicates the presence of both antigens and O the absence of both. What do the symbols + and – represent in the classification of blood? More… Discuss

Gene from Extinct Humans Helps Tibetans Breathe Easy


Gene from Extinct Humans Helps Tibetans Breathe Easy

The genetic adaptation that allows Tibetans to survive and live comfortably at altitudes that would make most other humans on Earth terribly sick came from an extinct species of human. The variant of the EPAS-1 gene carried by nearly 90 percent of Tibetans closely matches that of the extinct Denisovan people. This gene is involved in regulating hemoglobin production and helps the body produce enough red blood cells to cope with low oxygen levels but not so many as to dangerously thicken the blood. The findings suggest that at some point in the history of the Tibetan people, their ancestors mated with Denisovans, thereby acquiring this adaptation. More… Discuss

Blood Transfusion


Blood Transfusion

A blood transfusion is the administration of whole blood or a component to counteract blood loss caused by trauma, surgery, or disease. In some cases, whole blood is not needed or is unavailable, so an individual component—plasma, red or white cells, platelets—is used. In whole-blood transfusions, the donor’s blood must be compatible with that of the recipient. Autologous transfusions are those that use the recipient’s own blood, banked in advance. When was the first human blood transfusion? More… Discuss

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: JAN SWAMMERDAM (1637)


Jan Swammerdam (1637)

Dutch naturalist Jan Swammerdam was a pioneer in the use of the microscope and made valuable contributions to the understanding of human anatomy and the future of anatomical study. He was the first person to observe and describe red blood cells, and he improved techniques for examining, preserving, and dissecting cadavers. However, his primary focus was the study of insects, many of which he described and drew in great detail. What led him to eventually abandon his scientific pursuits? More… Discuss

 

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