Tag Archives: Reformation

this day in the yesteryear: Edict of Worms Declares Martin Luther an Outlaw and Heretic (1521)


Edict of Worms Declares Martin Luther an Outlaw and Heretic (1521)

The Diet of Worms was an assembly opened by Holy Roman Emperor Charles V to deal with the question of Martin Luther’s recalcitrant behavior. Luther was asked to retract his teachings condemned by the pope, but he refused. Various theologians argued with him for a week, but he would not change his position. On May 25, Luther was formally declared an outlaw in the Edict of Worms, and the lines of the Reformation were thereby hardened. Who hid Luther to protect him from the edict’s enforcers? More… Discuss

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Felix Mendelssohn Symphony No 5 D major minor ‘Reformation’ S. Baudo OSI


[youtube.com/watch?v=cbI1HEurX-c]

Felix Mendelssohn Symphony No 5 D major minor ‘Reformation’ S. Baudo OSI

 
watercolour portrait against blank background of a young man with dark, curly hair, facing the spectator: dressed in fashionable clothes of the 1830s, dark jacket with velvet collar, black silk cravat, high collar, white waistcoat

Portrait of Mendelssohn by James Warren Childe, 1839

The Symphony No. 5 in D major/D minor, Op. 107, known as the Reformation, was composed by Felix Mendelssohn in 1830 in honor of the 300th anniversary of the Presentation of the Augsburg Confession. The Confession is a key document of Lutheranism and its Presentation to Emperor Charles V in June 1530 was a momentous event of the Protestant Reformation. This symphony was written for a full orchestra and was Mendelssohn’s second extended symphony. It was not published until 1868, 21 years after the composer’s death – hence its numbering as ‘5’. Although the symphony is not very frequently performed, it is better known today than it was during Mendelssohn’s lifetime.

Key

The key of the symphony is stated as D major on the title page of Mendelssohn’s autograph score. However, only the slow introduction is written in D Major, whereas the main theme and the cadence setting of the first movement are in D minor. The composer himself referred to the symphony on at least one occasion as in D minor.[5]

Instrumentation

The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, “serpente” (possibly a serpent[6]) and contrabassoon (fourth movement only, now usually played on the contrabassoon alone), 2 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, timpani and strings.

Form

The symphony is in four movements:

  1. Andante — Allegro con fuoco
  2. Allegro vivace
  3. Andante
  4. Andante con moto — Allegro maestoso
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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: HULDRYCH ZWINGLI (1484)


Huldrych Zwingli (1484)

Zwingli was a Swiss theologian who championed the Reformation in Switzerland. Inspired by his studies rather than a crisis of faith, he challenged the ritualism, decadence, and hierarchy of the Catholic Church, and his stance on the sacrament of communion brought him into conflict with both Martin Luther and the Church. After a Zurich council approved many of his proposals, organs were destroyed, priests were allowed to wed, and the liturgy was simplified. In what 1531 battle was Zwingli killed? More…Discuss

 

Fabulous Compositions/ Composers: L. Bernstein – Mendelssohn Symphony No.5 in Dmajor/D minor “Reformation” Op.107



Mendelssohn Symphony No.5 in D major/D minor “Reformation” Op.107 Complete

1. Andante — Allegro con fuoco
2. Allegro vivace
3. Andante
4. Andante con moto — Allegro maestoso

NY Philharmonic Orchestra
Leonard Bernstein Conductor

L. Bernstein – Mendelssohn Symphony No.5 in D major/D minor “Reformation” Op.107



Mendelssohn Symphony No.5 in D major/D minor “Reformation” Op.107 Complete

1. Andante — Allegro con fuoco
2. Allegro vivace
3. Andante
4. Andante con moto — Allegro maestoso

NY Philharmonic Orchestra
Leonard Bernstein Conductor