Tag Archives: Renaissance

today’s birthday: Michelangelo (1475)


Michelangelo (1475)

Among the world’s most celebrated artists, Michelangelo was one of the foremost figures of the Renaissance. The marble David, completed before his 30th birthday, is a sculptural masterpiece, and his paintings in the Sistine Chapel are among the most influential frescoes in the history of Western art. A true “Renaissance man,” he also was an architect and poet and wrote hundreds of sonnets and madrigals. Where in the Sistine Chapel is there a disguised self-portrait of Michelangelo? More… Discuss

quotation: The wise man does at once what the fool does finally. Niccolo Machiavelli


The wise man does at once what the fool does finally.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469-1527) Discuss

Venice (on my mind) + Venetian and Neapolitan Music for Consort of Viols / L’Amoroso


Venice

The Italian city of Venice spans more than 100 small islands in the Venetian Lagoon of the Adriatic Sea. Separating the islands are about 150 narrow canals crossed by some 400 bridges. The curving Grand Canal is the city’s main traffic artery. Now a tourist, commercial, and industrial center, Venice was at its artistic peak during the Renaissance, and it owes its origin to refugees who came to the islands while fleeing Lombard invaders in the 6th century. What are traghetti? More… Discuss

 

today’s holiday: Five-Petalled Rose Festival


Five-Petalled Rose Festival

The Festival of the Five-Petalled Rose takes place in Cesky Krumlov in the Czech Republic, which prospered during the Renaissance; today’s festival permits residents and visitors to relive the town’s past glories. Festival highlights include swordplay demonstrations, plays and street dramas, a medieval feast, a historical market, Renaissance crafts, musical entertainment, and medieval games and dances. The festival takes its name from the rose on the coat of arms of the Rosenbergs, the noble family that lived in the town castle during the late medieval and Renaissance periods. More… Discuss

Michelangelo’s David Has an Achilles Heel


Michelangelo’s David Has an Achilles Heel

Well, technically, it is more like Achilles ankles. Experts say the Renaissance masterpiece is at risk of collapsing under its own weight because of the stress placed on the sculpture’s weak ankles. Micro-fractures and cracks are appearing in both of David‘s legs as well as the carved tree stump behind the figure’s right leg. Though it might escape the layman’s eye, the statue is carved of poor quality marble. This, compounded by the centuries-old statue’s great weight—upward of 6 tons—and off-center pose, means that an earthquake or even nearby roadwork could cause the figure to topple. More… Discuss

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: LUCREZIA BORGIA (1480)


Lucrezia Borgia (1480)

Lucrezia was an Italian noblewoman and daughter of the future Pope Alexander VI. Her family came to epitomize the ruthless Machiavellian politics and sexual corruption allegedly characteristic of the Renaissance papacy, but rumors of her participation in her family’s poison plots and of incestuous relations with her father and brother have not been proved. Nevertheless, Lucrezia is often viewed as a femme fatale and has been portrayed as such in many works of art. What are a few examples? More… Discuss

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: LEONARDO DA VINCI (1452)


Leonardo da Vinci (1452)

Da Vinci was an Italian painter, sculptor, architect, musician, engineer, and scientist. His drawings depict subjects ranging from flying machines to caricatures

The Mona Lisa.

The Mona Lisa. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

and are rendered with scientific precision and consummate artistry. Included among his works are intricate anatomical studies of humans, animals, and plants. The richness and originality of intellect expressed in his notebooks reveal one of the greatest minds of all time. Why are most of his journals written in mirror-image cursive? More… Discuss

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QUOTATION: Niccolo Machiavelli


There are three classes of intellects: one which comprehends by itself; another which appreciates what others comprehend; and a third which neither comprehends by itself nor by the showing of others; the first is the most excellent, the second is good, and the third is useless.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469-1527) Discuss

 

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WEB GALLERY OF ARTS – ACCESS HERE (NOW A PERMANENT FEATURE / WIDGET AT EUZICASA)


WEB GALLERY OF ARTS - ACCESS HERE

WEB GALLERY OF ARTS – ACCESS HERE

PLEASE VISIT AND LEAVE YOUR COMMENTS HERE! 

The Web Gallery of Art is a virtual museum and searchable database of Western (European) fine arts of the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, and Impressionism periods (1000-1900), currently containing over 33.300 reproductions. Artist biographies, commentaries, guided tours, period music, catalogue, free postcard and mobile services are provided.

ECLECTICISM


Eclecticism

In eclecticism, a concept used in many disciplines, elements from diverse styles are selected and combined into a single system. The term “eclectic” can describe artists who combine, for example, elements from the Renaissance and classical traditions in their paintings. It can also be applied to philosophers who take elements from different systems of thought without regard for possible contradictions. In this way, the term is sometimes used pejoratively. What musicians are considered eclectic?More… Discuss

 

Archimedes’ Secret (BBC Documentary)



This is the story of a book that could have changed the history of the World. To the untrained eye, it is nothing more than a small and unassuming Byzantine prayer book, yet it sold at Christies for over $2m. For faintly visible beneath the prayers on its pages are other, unique, writings – words that have been lost for nearly two thousand years.

The text is the only record of work by one of the world’s greatest minds – the ancient Greek, Archimedes – a mathematical genius centuries ahead of his time. Hidden for a millennium in a middle eastern library, it has been written over, broken up, painted on, cut up and re-glued. But in the nick of time scientists have saved the precious, fragile document, and for the first time it is revealing just how revolutionary Archimedes’ ideas were. If it had been available to scholars during the Renaissance, we might have reached the Moon over a hundred years ago.

The trail begins in the tenth century, when a scribe made a unique copy of the most important mathematics that Archimedes ever developed. For 200 years the document survived, but the mathematics in it was so complex that no one paid it any attention. So when one day a monk was looking for some new parchment – an expensive commodity at the time – to write a new prayer book, the answer seemed obvious. He used the Archimedes manuscript. He washed the Greek text off the pages, cut them in half, rebound them, and turned the Archimedes manuscript into an everyday prayer book. As he piously wrote out his prayers, he had no idea of the genius he was obliterating.

Several hundred years later, the Renaissance was under way. Scientists were beginning to grapple with new concepts, working out how mathematics could be used to explain the World around them. Little did they know that many of the problems they were just encountering Archimedes had already solved more than a thousand years before. So, tragically, they had to do that research all over again, setting back the development of science and technology immeasurably.

Then in 1906, in Constantinople, the document mysteriously turned up in a monastic library. An opportunistic scholar called Johan Ludwig Heiberg identified the text as Archimedes’ writings. Although the Greek text was very faint, Heiberg was able to decipher some of it. What he found astonished him, and made the front page of the New York Times. He revealed that Archimedes’ manuscript contained something called ‘The Method’, which showed not only Archimedes’ final proofs, but for the first time revealed the process of how he went about making his discoveries.

 

Today’s Birthday: Petrarch (1304)- “The Father of Humanism”


Petrarch (1304)

The “Father of Humanism,” Petrarch was the greatest scholar of his age. He traveled widely, visiting fellow scholars and searching out manuscripts, and wrote numerous lyrics, sonnets, and canzoni. His awareness of the classical past as a source of literary and philosophical meaning for the present left a lasting influence on European literature and paved the way for the Renaissance. Many of Petrarch’s poems are devoted to what woman, who awoke a lasting passion in him on Good Friday in 1327? More… Discuss

William Byrd – Justorum animae. Worcester Cathedral choir



William Byrd (1540 or late 1539 – 4 July 1623) was an English composer of the Renaissance. He wrote in many of the forms current in England at the time, including various types of sacred and secular polyphony, keyboard (the so-called Virginian school) and consort music.

Our knowledge of Byrd’s biography has expanded in recent years, thanks largely to the research of John Harley (Harley, 1997). Following the discovery of a document dated 2 October 1598 in which Byrd’s age is given as ’58 years or there about’s it now appears that he was born in 1540. The older dating 1542–3 is derived from Byrd’s will (endorsed on 22 November 1622) which describes him as ‘in the 80th year of my age’. It now becomes clear that it must have been drafted about three years earlier than the date of endorsement. Byrd was born in London, the son of a Thomas Byrd (not Thomas Byrd of the Chapel Royal) about whom little is known. Byrd had two brothers, Symon’d and John, and four sisters. It is clear from a reference in the prefatory material in the Tallis/Byrd Cantiones of 1575 that Byrd was a pupil of Thomas Tallis, then the leading composing member of the Chapel Royal Choir. Byrd also worked in collaboration with two other Chapel Royal singing-men, John Sheppard and William Mundy, on one of his earliest compositions, a contribution to a joint setting of the alternatim psalm In exitu Israel composed for the procession to the font at the Paschal Vigil. As an item for the Sarum liturgy this was presumably composed near the end of the reign of Mary Tudor (1553–1558), whose Catholic beliefs impelled her to revive Sarum liturgical practices during her brief reign. In view of these contacts it is reasonable to speculate that Byrd was a Chapel Royal choirboy, though the surviving records do not name the choristers individually.
(Source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Byrd)

Related Online Reference

Today’s Birthday: Luis de Góngora y Argote (1561)


Luis de Góngora y Argote (1561)

Góngora was a poet of the Spanish Golden Age who successfully wove Renaissance and popular poetry into an original and elegant form. Very influential in his era, he developed the difficult, complex poetic style that became known as Gongorism. It provoked enmity from many of his contemporaries and was so exaggerated by less gifted imitators that his reputation suffered until the 20th century. He has since been called Spain’s greatest poet. What is his most famous work? More… Discuss

Today’s Article (June 20): Simonetta Vespucci


Simonetta Vespucci


Simonetta as Cleopatra by Piero di Cosimo, c. 1480
Born c.1453
Genoa or Portovenere, Italy
Died 26 April 1476
Florence, Italy
Occupation Model
Parents Gaspare Cattaneo Della Voltaand Cattocchia Spinola de Candia

Simonetta was the Genoese wife of the Italian nobleman Marco Vespucci of Florence. Renowned as the greatest beauty of her age, she was the subject of countless portraits, including many by the Italian master Sandro Botticelli. Some claim that the goddess depicted in Botticelli’s masterpiece, Birth of Venus, was modeled after Simonetta, even though she died at the age of 22—several years before it was completed. What fact about Botticelli’s burial place lends credence to the theory? More… Discuss

The_Birth_of_Venus-Sandro_Botticelli

The_Birth_of_Venus-Sandro_Botticelli