Tag Archives: Richard Wagner

Watch “Richard Wagner – The Valkyrie, WWV 86b, Ride of the Valkyries (Oslo Philharmonic/ Maris Jansons)” on YouTube


Advertisements

this day in the yesteryear: Wagner’s Parsifal Premieres in the Bayreuth Festival Theatre (1882)


Wagner’s Parsifal Premieres in the Bayreuth Festival Theatre (1882)

Loosely based on Wolfram von Eschenbach’s Parzival—the medieval epic poem of the Arthurian knight Parzival and his quest for the Holy Grail—Parsifal is a three-act opera by German composer Richard Wagner. The opera was first conceived in 1857 but not completed until 25 years later. It premiered in 1882 at the second Bayreuth Festival, where it was performed exclusively until 1903. What tradition has arisen among the audience at performances of Parsifal at Bayreuth? More… Discuss

Wagner Concert in Leipzig 1988 DDR 3 – Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg (‘Wach Auf’ and Finale)


Wagner Concert in Leipzig 1988 DDR 3 – Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg (‘Wach Auf’ and Finale)

Rimsky Korsakov – Dance Of The Tumblers -: make music pat of your life series


Rimsky Korsakov – Dance Of The Tumblers –

Saturday Matinee Teatro alla Scala: Il Barbieri Di Sivilia, Rosini (1999): Make music part of your life series


Il Barbiere Di SivigliaG.Rossini – Scala – 1999

Richard Wagner – Rienzi Ouverture: make music part of your life series


Richard Wagner – Rienzi Ouverture

Bayreuth Festival


Bayreuth Festival

Bayreuth, Germany, is home to this annual festival devoted to the performance of operas by Richard Wagner. Wagner launched the festival in 1876 to showcase a variety of German music and did not intend for his compositions to be the focus. The event was plagued by financial problems in its early years, but survived through state intervention and the support of influential Wagnerians, including Ludwig II of Bavaria and Adolf Hitler. Who did Hitler beg—unsuccessfully—to lead the festival? More… Discuss

Richard Wagner – Ride of the Valkyries + Magic Fire Music: great compositions/performances


Richard WagnerRide of the Valkyries + Magic Fire Music (orchestral versions)

From “50 Erotic Classics – Sensual Classical Music from the Red Room”, Philharmonia Slavonica conducted by Alfred Scholz. From “Classic Operas – Wagner: The Ring of the Nibelungen (Highlights)”, Budapest Symphony Orchestra conducted by Gyorgy Lehel.I do not own any of the material in the video.

 

Richard Wagner Overture from the Flying Dutchman: make music part of your life series


Richard Wagner Overture from the Flying Dutchman

Claude Debussy – Printemps (Suite symphonique): great compositions/performances


Claude Debussy – Printemps (Suite symphonique)

Orquestra Sinfônica de Minas Gerais – (OSMG)
Regência: Charles Roussin

Carl Maria von Weber/Hector Berlioz – Invitation to the Dance, Op. 65: great compositions/performances



From: Fledermaus1990

Carl Maria von Weber/Hector Berlioz – Invitation to the Dance, Op. 65

Invitation to the Dance (Aufforderung zum Tanz), Op. 65, J. 260, is a piano piece in rondo form written by Carl Maria von Weber in 1819. It is also well known in the 1841 orchestration by Hector Berlioz. It is sometimes called Invitation to the Waltz, but this is a mistranslation of the original.

Weber dedicated Invitation to the Dance to his wife Caroline (they had been married only a few months).[2] He labelled the work “rondeau brillante”, and he wrote it while also writing his opera Der Freischütz.

It was the first concert waltz to be written: that is, the first work in waltz form meant for listening rather than for dancing.

Conductor: Ondrej Lenard
Orchestra: Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra

Chabrier – Fête polonaise, from the opera “Le Roi malgré lui” (Acte II)


[youtube.com/watch?v=TbNhugsSW7c]

Chabrier – Fête polonaise, from the opera “Le Roi malgré lui” (Acte II)

Great Compositions/Performances: Wagner Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg; Prelude to Act I; Solti


[youtube.com/watch?v=3nhcTllJgIY]

Wagner Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg; Prelude to Act I; Solti

Wilhelm Richard Wagner
Sir Georg Solti
Vienna Philharmonic

This piece introduces the first act of the composer’s music drama called The Mastersingers of Nuremberg. Similar to his other operas, he wrote the scenario and libretto in addition to the musical score.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performanaces: Wagner – Siegfried Act II: Forest Murmurs (Nature)


[youtube.com/watch?v=08vTtu4pmjk]

Wagner – Siegfried Act II: “Forest Murmurs” (Nature)

The peaceful beauty of the forest enchants Siegfried. He listens to the song of a bird, who tells him of a beautiful woman named Brünnhilde, asleep on a mountain encircled by a ring of magic fire. Only one who has no fear can pass through the flames and awaken her from sleep. Siegfried immediately sets out to find her.

*****Music performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra, conducted by  Eugene Ormandy.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Georges Enesco: Roumanian Rhapsody #1 in A Op 11, Sergiu Celibidache conducting


[youtube.com/watch?v=4TDCMoou2Uc]
Georges Enesco: Roumanian Rhapsody #1 in A Op 11
George Enescu – Rapsodia Romana nr.1
Sergiu Celibidache conducting
This is THE perfect one ! No other conductor/orchestra makes me feel it and live it like this.

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: ARTURO TOSCANINI (1867)


Arturo Toscanini (1867)

Internationally recognized as one of the world’s great conductors, Toscanini first took the baton as a substitute conductor in Brazil. Toscanini’s artistry is preserved in recordings, notably of the symphonies of Beethoven and works by Brahms, Wagner, Verdi, and others. A tempestuous personality greatly respected by his performers, he also served as musical director of La Scala, Milan, and of the Metropolitan Opera, New York City. Before becoming a conductor, Toscanini studied what instrument?More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Richard Wagner – Siegfried Idyll (Conductor: Sergiu Celibidache & Münchner Philharmoniker)



Great Compositions/Performances:  Richard WagnerSiegfried Idyll
Conductor: Sergiu Celibidache & Münchner Philharmoniker

Apart from the operas, Wagner composed a small number of pieces; this stems from his reluctance to conceive music which didn’t belong to the sacredness of the drama, fundamental expression of his thought.
The “Siegfried Idyll” is a symphonic poem for chamber orchestra, composed by Richard Wagner (1813-1883) as a birthday present to his second wife, Cosima, after the birth of their son Siegfried in 1869. It was first performed on Christmas morning, 25 December 1870, by a small ensemble on the stairs of their villa at Tribschen.
Wagner’s opera “Siegfried”, which was premiered in 1876, incorporates music from the Idyll. It was once thought that the Idyll borrowed musical ideas intended for the opera, but it is now known that the opposite is the case: Wagner adapted melodic material from an unfinished chamber piece in the Idyll and later incorporated it into the love scene between Siegfried and Brunhilde in the opera.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Brahms, Symphony Nr 3 F Dur op 90 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker


From Wikipedia:

The Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90, is a symphony by Johannes Brahms. The work was written in the summer of 1883 at Wiesbaden, nearly six years after he completed his Second Symphony. In the interim Brahms had written some of his greatest works, including the Violin Concerto, two overtures (Tragic Overture and Academic Festival Overture), and the Second Piano Concerto.

The premiere performance was given on 2 December 1883 by the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, under the direction of Hans Richter. The shortest of Brahms’ four symphonies, a typical performance lasts between 30 and 40 minutes.

Instrumentation

The symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, a contrabassoon, four horns, two trumpets, three trombonestimpani, and strings.

Form

The symphony consists of four movements, marked as follows:

  1. Allegro con brio (F major), in sonata form.
  2. Andante (C major), in a modified sonata form.
  3. Poco allegretto (C minor), in ternary form (A B A’).
  4. Allegro (F minor/F major), in a modified sonata form.

History

Hans Richter, who conducted the premiere of the symphony, proclaimed it to be Brahms’ Eroica. The symphony was well received, more so than his Second Symphony. Although Richard Wagner had died earlier that year, the public feud between Brahms and Wagner had not yet subsided. Wagner enthusiasts tried to interfere with the symphony’s premiere, and the conflict between the two factions nearly brought about a duel.[1]

After each performance, Brahms polished his score further, until it was published in May 1884. His friend and influential music critic Eduard Hanslick said, “Many music lovers will prefer the titanic force of the First Symphony; others, the untroubled charm of the Second, but the Third strikes me as being artistically the most nearly perfect.”[1]

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Brahms, Symphony Nr 3 F Dur op 90 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker


Brahms, Symphony Nr 3 F Dur op 90 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90, is a symphony by Johannes Brahms. The work was written in the summer of 1883 at Wiesbaden, nearly six years after he completed his Second Symphony. In the interim Brahms had written some of his greatest works, including the Violin Concerto, two overtures (Tragic Overture and Academic Festival Overture), and the Second Piano Concerto.

The premiere performance was given on 2 December 1883 by the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, under the direction of Hans Richter. The shortest of Brahms’ four symphonies, a typical performance lasts between 30 and 40 minutes.

Form

The symphony consists of four movements, marked as follows:

  1. Allegro con brio (F major), in sonata form.
  2. Andante (C major), in a modified sonata form.
  3. Poco allegretto (C minor), in ternary form (A B A’).
  4. Allegro (F minor/F major), in a modified sonata form.

History

Hans Richter, who conducted the premiere of the symphony, proclaimed it to be Brahms’ Eroica. The symphony was well received, more so than his Second Symphony. Although Richard Wagner had died earlier that year, the public feud between Brahms and Wagner had not yet subsided. Wagner enthusiasts tried to interfere with the symphony’s premiere, and the conflict between the two factions nearly brought about a duel.[1]

After each performance, Brahms polished his score further, until it was published in May 1884. His friend and influential music critic Eduard Hanslick said, “Many music lovers will prefer the titanic force of the First Symphony; others, the untroubled charm of the Second, but the Third strikes me as being artistically the most nearly perfect.”[1]

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life: Horowitz plays Wagner-Liszt Isolde’s Liebestod



Last but not least. It took the legendary pianist three separate days to record this piece to his satisfaction, and he died a mere four days after its completion on November 5, 1989. 

Horowitz did not record the other Liszt transcriptions of Wagner such as the Tanhauser Overture, though the biography by authored Harold Schonberg noted that he played an enormous amount of his own transcriptions of operatic music, including the Ride of the Valkyrie. However, Horowitz did not programme most of them once he arrived in the United States.

Related articles

Enhanced by Zemanta

Wagner -Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Prelude and Liebestod from ‘Tristan Und Isolde’ (Karajan-BPO-Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra)



From  the Author-DjangoMan1963:  “This is my personal vote for the greatest piece of music ever.
The version here is by the Berlin Philharmonic, conducted by the late, great Herbert Von Karajan.

The jewish coductor Daniel Barenboim aptly said: “The music is bigger than the man”. Anyone who dismisses Wagner’s music on the basis of his views as a man, is missing something truly wonderful.

I’ve chosen Karajan’s version because he gets the tempo and the feel just right. Not too much vibratro here, which other conductors sometimes bring to the piece, making it sound too overwrought. He gets it spot on. A touch of vibrato, but he let’s the notes speak for themselves, whilst the languid tempo evokes a mystical atmosphere to the piece.

I hope you enjoy this wonderful music.”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Richard Wagner
Photo of Wagner

Tristan und Isolde (Tristan and Isolde, or Tristan and Isolda, or Tristran and Ysolt) is an opera, or music drama, in three acts by Richard Wagner to a German libretto by the composer, based largely on the romance by Gottfried von Straßburg. It was composed between 1857 and 1859 and premiered in Munich on 10 June 1865 with Hans von Bülow conducting. Wagner referred to the work not as an opera, but called it “eine Handlung” (literally a drama. a plot or an action), which was the equivalent of the term used by the Spanish playwright Calderón for his dramas.
Wagner’s composition of Tristan und Isolde was inspired by the philosophy of Arthur Schopenhauer (particularly The World as Will and Representation) and his affair with Mathilde Wesendonck. Widely acknowledged as one of the peaks of the operatic repertory, Tristan was notable for Wagner’s unprecedented use of chromaticismtonality, orchestral colour and harmonic suspension.
The opera was inexorably influential among Western classical composers and provided direct inspiration to composers such as Gustav MahlerRichard StraussKarol SzymanowskiAlban BergArnold Schönberg and Benjamin Britten. Other composers like Claude DebussyMaurice Ravel and Igor Stravinsky formulated their styles in contrast to Wagner’s musical legacy. Many see Tristan as the beginning of the move away from common practice harmony and tonality and consider that it lays the groundwork for the direction of classical music in the 20th century.[1] Both Wagner’s libretto style and music were also profoundly influential on the Symbolist poets of the late 19th Century and early 20th Century.[2]

Composition history

Wagner was forced to abandon his position as conductor of the Dresden Opera in 1849, as there was a warrant posted for his arrest for his participation in the unsuccessfulMay Revolution. He left his wife, Minna, in Dresden, and fled to Zürich. There, in 1852, he met the wealthy silk trader Otto Wesendonck. Wesendonck became a supporter of Wagner and bankrolled the composer for several years. Wesendonck’s wife, Mathilde, became enamoured of the composer. Though Wagner was working on his epic Der Ring des Nibelungen, he found himself intrigued by the legend of Tristan and Iseult.

The re-discovery of mediæval Germanic poetry, including Gottfried von Strassburg‘s version of Tristan, the Nibelungenlied and Wolfram von Eschenbach‘s Parzival, left a large impact on the German Romantic movements during the mid-19th century. The story of Tristan and Isolde is a quintessential romance of the Middle Ages and theRenaissance. Several versions of the story exist, the earliest dating to the middle of the 12th century. Gottfried’s version, part of the “courtly” branch of the legend, had a huge influence on later German literature.[3]

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Madama Butterfly – Vogliatemi bene – Jonas Kaufmann and Angela GheorghiuMadama Butterfly – Vogliatemi bene – Jonas Kaufmann and Angela Gheorghiu



Jonas Kaufmann and Angela Gheorghiu, Vogliatemi bene, from the recording sessions of the EMI Madama Butterfly in Rome, July 2008

Buy “Madama Butterfly, Act 1: Vogliatemi bene, un bene piccolino (Butterfly/Pinkerton)” on

Google PlayAmazonMP3,  

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great compositions/Performances: Debussy, Printemps: Suite Symphonique. Pierre Boulez


Claude Debussy

Printemps, symphonic suite for chorus, piano & orchestra, L. 61

1. Tres Modere

Claude Debussy LOC 23688
2. Modere 
Pierre Boulez

From AllMusic

One of Debussy‘s assignments as a Prix de Rome scholar at the Villa Medici in 1887 was to send back to the Fine Arts Academy in France an orchestral score so his benefactors could judge his professional progress. All Debussy managed to turn in was a piano duet called Printemps, or “Spring”; he claimed that the full score, complete with humming chorus, had been destroyed in a fire. Not until 1913 did he get around to generating an orchestral version, and even then the work was assigned to Henri Büsser who, working from the keyboard original, had no access to any original choral material. In a nod to the music’s origins, Büsser included a prominent but not quite concertante keyboard part in the finished score.

The Academy committee found the piece to be excessively progressive, which in the late 1880s meant little more than Wagnerian in its chromaticism. (The committee’s condemnation includes the first recorded application of the term “Impressionism” to Debussy‘s music.) Only in the orchestration did the music begin to sound like mature, Impressionistic Debussy, that effect achieved through timbre rather than harmony. The composer said he intended to compose a work “of a particular color, covering as wide a range of sensations as possible.” Actually, in terms of sensations, Printemps is limited to two: yearning, giving way to relaxed happiness. Debussydescribed the music’s program as “the slow, laborious birth of beings and things in nature, and then their blossoming outward and upward, and finally a burst of joy at being reborn to new life.” Consequently, the piece falls into two movements, both at moderate tempo, and neither employ particularly straightforward or memorable melodic material; the emphasis is entirely on mood.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 3 in E flat major, Op. 10



Symfonie č. 3 Es dur, Op. 10

00:00 Allegro moderato
11:33 Adagio molto, tempo di marcia
28:27 Finale. Allegro vivace

Czech philharmonic orchestra, Václav Neumann

Česká filharmonie, Václav Neumann
EN
Symphony no.3 in E flat major was premiered by Bedřich Smetana in 1874. It was a great moment for young Dvořák, because it was his first big score played in public. You can heard in this symphony typical dvořák’s melodies but also some inspiration from Liszt or Wagner (work with motives, harmonies).

 

Vienna New Year’s Concert 2013 – Richard Wagner: Prelude to Act III of ‘Lohengrin,’ WWV 75



Richard Wagner: Prelude to Act III of the Romantic Opera ‘Lohengrin‘ / Preludio del acto III de la ópera romántica “Lohengrin”, WWV 75

New Year’s Concert of the Vienna Philharmonic, conducted by Franz Welser-Möst, at the Golden Hall of the Musikverein in Vienna, Austria on January 1, 2013. 

Concierto de Año Nuevo de la Orquesta Filarmónica de Viena, dirigida por Franz Welser-Möst, en la Sala Dorada de la Musikverein de Viena (Austria) el 01/01/2013.

Playlist / Lista de reproducción:
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=..

 

ROSSINI: William Tell Overture



Gioacchino Rossini: William Tell Overture (1829)

London Philharmonic, Alfred Scholz

 

L’ÉTOILE – Oper von Emmanuel Chabrier | Staatsoper Berlin



Premiere: 16. Mai 2010 | Staatsoper Unter den Linden | Berlin

Wiederaufnahme: 04. Dezember 2011 | Staatsoper im Schiller Theater | Berlin

http://www.staatsoper-berlin.de

 

Forest Murmurs – Siegfried Act II – Wagner – Nature [Philadelphia Orchestra, conducted by Eugene Ormandy.]



The peaceful beauty of the forest enchants Siegfried. He listens to the song of a bird, who tells him of a beautiful woman named Brünnhilde, asleep on a mountain encircled by a ring of magic fire. Only one who has no fear can pass through the flames and awaken her from sleep. Siegfried immediately sets out to find her.

Music performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra, conducted by Eugene Ormandy.

Wagner Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg; Prelude to Act I; Solti



Wilhelm Richard Wagner
Sir Georg Solti 
Vienna Philharmonic

This piece introduces the first act of the composer’s music drama called The Mastersingers of Nuremberg. Similar to his other operas, he wrote the scenario and libretto in addition to the musical score.

 

Hans Knappertsbusch “Funeral march” Götterdämmerung



Siegfried`s funeral march from
Götterdämmerung by Richard Wagner (1813-1883)
Wiener Philharmoniker
Hans Knappertsbusch, conductor
Wien VI.1956

 

Today Birthday: Sir Georg Solti (1912)


Sir Georg Solti (1912)

Solti was a Hungarian-born British conductor. Not long after making his piano debut at age 12, he decided he wanted to conduct. He returned to piano during WWII and won the 1942 Geneva International Competition. After the war, he began conducting again and led orchestras all over Europe and the US. As director of the Royal Opera House, he made the first full recording of Richard Wagner’s Ring cycle, one of history’s most celebrated recordings. How did he earn the nickname “the screaming skull“? More… Discuss