Tag Archives: Romeo And Juliet

Watch “Prokofiev-Romeo and Juliet ☆The World Orchestra ☆Josep Vicent” on YouTube


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Romeo and Juliet(Prokofiev)

Romeo and Juliet (Russian: Ромео и Джульетта), Op. 64, is a ballet by Sergei Prokofiev based on William Shakespeare‘s play Romeo and Juliet. Prokofiev reused music from the ballet in three suites for orchestra and a solo piano work.

Romeo and Juliet
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Commemorative coin depicting a scene from the ballet

Choreographer Ivo Váña-Psota
Music Sergei Prokofiev
Based on Romeo and Juliet
Premiere 1938
Mahen Theatre, Brno
Original ballet company Ballet of the National Theatre, Brno
Characters Ivo Váña-Psota as Romeo
Zora Šemberováas Juliet
Genre Drambalet

Background and premiereEdit

Based on a synopsis created by Adrian Piotrovsky (who first suggested the subject to Prokofiev)[1]and Sergey Radlov, the ballet was composed by Prokofiev in September 1935 to their scenario which followed the precepts of “drambalet” (dramatised ballet, officially promoted at the Kirov Ballet to replace works based primarily on choreographic display and innovation).[2] Following Radlov’s acrimonious resignation from the Kirov in June 1934, a new agreement was signed with the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow on the understanding that Piotrovsky would remain involved.[3]

However, the ballet’s original happy ending (contrary to Shakespeare) provoked controversy among Soviet cultural officials.[4] The ballet’s production was then postponed indefinitely when the staff of the Bolshoi was overhauled at the behest of the chairman of the Committee on Arts Affairs, Platon Kerzhentsev.[5]The ballet’s failure to be produced within Soviet Russia until 1940 may also have been due to the increased fear and caution in the musical and theatrical community in the aftermath of the two notorious Pravda editorials criticising Shostakovich and other “degenerate modernists” including Piotrovsky.[6] The conductor Yuri Fayermet with Prokofiev frequently during the writing of the music, and he strongly urged the composer to revert to the traditional ending. Fayer went on to conduct the first performance of the ballet at the Bolshoi Theatre.

Suites of the ballet music were heard in Moscow and the United States, but the full ballet premiered in the Mahen Theatre, Brno (then in Czechoslovakia, now in the Czech Republic), on 30 December 1938.[7] This version was a single-act production with music mainly from the first two suites. Prokofiev was not able to attend the premiere due to his status of outbound restriction.

1940 Kirov productionEdit

Galina Ulanova and Yuri Zhdanov in the ballet

It is better known today from the significantly revised version that was first presented at the Kirov Theatre(now Mariinsky Theatre) in Leningradon 11 January 1940, with choreography by Leonid Lavrovskyand with Galina Ulanova and Konstantin Sergeyev in the leading roles. Despite the objections of Prokofiev, Lavrovsky significantly changed the score of the ballet. This production received international acclaim and was awarded the Stalin Prize.

In 1955, Mosfilm made the film version of this production with Galina Ulanova as Juliet and Yuri Zhdanov as Romeo. This film won the Best Lyrical Film and nominated as Palme d’Or in the 1955 Cannes Film Festival.

Original Cast

Revivals and other productionsEdit

In 1955, Frederick Ashtonchoreographed a production of Romeo and Juliet for the Royal Danish Ballet.

In 1962, John Cranko‘s choreography of Romeo and Juliet for the Stuttgart Ballet helped the company achieve a worldwide reputation. It had its American premiere in 1969.

In 1965, choreographer Sir Kenneth MacMillan’s version for the Royal Ballet premiered at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. Margot Fonteyn and Rudolf Nureyev danced the title roles. Fonteyn, considered to be near retirement, embarked upon a rejuvenated career with a partnership with Nureyev. Also in 1965, Oleg Vinogradov stages a version in Russia while serving as assistant ballet master to Pyotr Gusev.

In 1971, John Neumeier, partly inspired by John Cranko, created another version of the ballet in Frankfurt. In 1974, Neumeier’s Romeo and Juliet premiered in Hamburg as his first full-length ballet with the company.

In 1977, Rudolf Nureyev created a new version of Romeo and Juliet for the London Festival Ballet, today’s English National Ballet. He performed the lead role of Romeo with British ballerina Patricia Ruanne creating the role of Juliet. As a partnership, they toured the production internationally, and it continues to be a popular ballet in the ENB repertoire, with its most recent revival in 2010 staged by Patricia Ruanne and Frederic Jahn of the original 1977 cast. This production was also staged by La Scala Theater Ballet in 1980 and Paris Opera Balletin 1984 and has been a renowned performance in the POB repertoire.

In 1979, Yuri Grigorovich created a new version for the Bolshoi, “which did away with most of the stage properties and stylized the action into an all-danced text.” This was revived in 2010 and remains in the Bolshoi repertory.[8]

A 2010 production at the Royal Swedish Opera

In 1985, choreographer László Seregi‘s production premiered at the Hungarian National Ballet, Budapest.

A 2014 Krzysztof Pastor’s production at the Polish National Ballet, dancers: Vladimir Yaroshenko and Maria Żuk

In 1996, choreographer Jean-Christophe Maillot premiered his version of Roméo et Juliette at Les Ballets de Monte Carlo. Taking formal inspiration from the episodic character of Sergei Prokofiev’s classic score, Maillot structured the action in a manner akin to cinematic narrative. Rather than focusing on themes of political-social opposition between the two feuding clans, this Romeo and Juliet highlights the dualities and ambiguities of adolescence.

In 2007, Peter Martins made Romeo + Juliet on New York City Ballet to the Prokofiev music.

In 2008, Krzysztof Pastor presented his version by the Scottish Ballet at the Edinburgh Festival Theatre. The Polish premiere of this version was by the Polish National Ballet in Warsaw, and the United States premiere was by the Joffrey Ballet in 2014.

On July 4, 2008, with the approval of the Prokofiev family and permission from the Russian State Archive, the original Prokofiev score was given its world premiere. Musicologist Simon Morrison, author of The People’s Artist: Prokofiev’s Soviet Years, unearthed the original materials in the Moscow archives, obtained permissions, and reconstructed the entire score. Mark Morris created the choreography for the production. The Mark Morris Dance Group premiered the work at the Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College in New York state. The production subsequently began a year-long tour to include Berkeley, Norfolk, London, New York, and Chicago.

In 2011, the National Ballet of Canadapremiered a new choreography of Romeo and Juliet by Alexei Ratmanskyin Toronto, with plans to take it on tour in Western Canada in early 2012.

ScoreEdit

InstrumentationEdit

In addition to a somewhat standard instrumentation, the ballet also requires the use of the tenor saxophone. This voice adds a unique sound to the orchestra as it is used both in solo and as part of the ensemble. Prokofiev also used the cornet, viola d’amore and mandolins in the ballet, adding an Italianate flavor to the music.

Full instrumentation is as follows:

make music part of your llife series: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet – Fantasy Overture


Romeo and Juliet: Sergei Prokofiev – Romeo and Juliet – Dance of the knights, great compositions/performances


Prokofiev – Romeo and Juliet – Dance of the knights

 
 
 
 
 

Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture | Valery Gergiev, London Symphony Orchestra , great compositions/performances


Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture | Valery Gergiev, London Symphony Orchestra

Leonard Bernstein – Maria (from West Side Story) , great compositions/performances


English: Leonard Bernstein, conductor and musi...

English: Leonard Bernstein, conductor and musical director of New York City Symphony Español: Leonard Bernstein, director de orquesta y director musical de la New York City Symphony (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Romeo And Juliet: Queen Mab Scherzo: make music part of your life series


Romeo And Juliet: Queen Mab Scherzo

 

Romeo and Juliet Overture – Prokofiev: make music part of your life series



from

Romeo and Juliet Overture – Prokofiev

Performed by the KU Symphonic Orchestra

great compositions/performancesTchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture | Valery Gergiev, London Symphony Orchestra


[youtube.com/watch?v=ZxOtYNf-eWE]

Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, Fantasy-Overture | Valery Gergiev, London Symphony Orchestra

Published by  Adagietto on Jan 13, 2013/ 108,521 views

From Adagietto:
Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky – Romeo and Juliet, fantasy-overture for orchestra in B minor, 1880. Maestro Valery Gergiev with the London Symphony Orchestra.

Numerous composers have responded to Shakespeare’s timeless drama of forbidden and youthful love, but Tchaikovsky’s response (along with Berlioz’s and Prokofiev’s) is at the top of the list. It is the only one of the three to be intended as a number in a symphony concert, and, hence is by default the most famous of the lot.

Tchaikovsky, a lawyer, was still developing as a composer at age 29 when Mily Balakirev (self-appointed father figure to Russian composers) persuaded him to write an orchestral work on the subject of the “star-cross’d lovers.” Balakirev outlined the form, planned the keys, and even suggested some of the actual music. After the 1870 premiere, he convinced Tchaikovsky to revise it. The work’s success in this form did much to transform the composer’s tendency toward crippling doubt into useful self-criticism. (Not that the transformation was ever total; Tchaikovsky suffered bouts of depression and self-doubt throughout his career.) The composer revised it again in 1880; this version is almost universally the one played. While the final version is probably the best one, the 1869 text is also a fine work and very much worth hearing. The earlier version begins with a charming tune that carries elements of the great love theme. In the first and second revisions Tchaikovsky eliminated this and replaced it with the benedictory theme representing Friar Laurence. The effect of this change on the overture’s structure is large. The first version seems to begin with Juliet still in a relatively childlike state, but with the potential for the great love present in the disguised premonitions of the love theme. The focus is, therefore, on the development of the drama as it unfolds. The later versions, beginning as it were with a prayer, seem to invite the hearer to look back on a tragedy that has already happened. Both versions proceed identically through depictions of the clashes between the houses of Montague and Capulet, and then unveil the great love music. After that, though, Tchaikovsky’s original idea seems to this writer to be superior: There is a great development, fugal-sounding and allowing for contrapuntal conflict based on the overture’s main rhythms and themes. It is tremendously exciting, more so than the music which replaced it. Justification for dropping it might be made along the lines that the original version has too much dramatic weight and overshadows the rest of the music. The main differences thereafter are in details of scoring, and in the finale, which in the original version is much too curt.

It is often instructive to see what a great composer has done at two different times with the same ideas and material. Whether or not it has greater musical merit, Tchaikovsky’s blessing of his final version served to ensure that it is the one that prevailed, and in that form it is accepted as one of the greatest programmatic pieces in the symphonic repertoire. The yearning love theme, in particular, is universally acknowledged as one of the greatest melodies ever written, while the exciting fight music and Tchaikovsky’s unfailingly clear and imaginative orchestration carry the listener through with hardly a misstep. But the original version is not far behind it in musical worth; it should be given more frequent revivals, if only for the sake of hearing the great fugato passage described above.

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Romeo und Julia, Romeo y Julieta, Roméo et Juliette, Romeo e Giulietta, Romeo en Julia, Romeu e Julieta, Romeo and Juliet, Romeu i Julieta, Romeo a Juliet, Romeo og Julie, Romeo kaj Julieta, Romeo i Julija, Romeo e Xulieta, Romeo dan Julia, Rómeó és Júlia, Romeo și Julieta, Romeowan Juliet, Romeo dhe Xhuljeta, Romeo ja Julia, Romeo och Julia, Romeo at Julieta, Romeo un Džuljeta

Visit  this site for many more wonderful unique musical moments! I suscribed to this channel  Adagietto

Prokofiev – Romeo & Juliet – Leningrad / Mravinsky


[youtube.com/watch?v=DXyv4SZmKyY]

Prokofiev – Romeo & Juliet – Leningrad / Mravinsky

Prokofiev - Romeo and Juliet

Prokofiev – Romeo and Juliet

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Prokofiev – Romeo And Juliet – Juliet As A Young Girl


[youtube.com/watch?v=9ITSmOC2dS8]

Prokofiev – Romeo And Juliet – Juliet As A Young Girl

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (1564)


William Shakespeare (1564)

Though his true date of birth remains unknown, the birthday of famed playwright and poet William Shakespeare is traditionally observed on April 23, the same day on which he died 52 years later. Since his death, his plays, such as Hamlet and Romeo and Juliet, have been performed and studied all over the world. Some scholars have speculated that Shakespeare did not write all of the works attributed to him. Who do they suggest was responsible for authoring the Shakespearean canon? More…Discuss

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Prokofiev – Romeo And Juliet – Juliet As A Young Girl (wonderful, expressive composition)



Prokofiev – Romeo And Juliet – Juliet As A Young Girl