Tag Archives: royal navy

this day in the yesteryear: Anglo-Zanzibar War Begins and Ends (1896)


Anglo-Zanzibar War Begins and Ends (1896)

The Anglo-Zanzibar War is the shortest war in history. Lasting only 38 minutes, the conflict broke out when Khalid bin Bargash seized power after the death of his uncle, Sultan Hamad bin Thuwaini. The British, who favored a different candidate, delivered an ultimatum ordering Bargash to abdicate. When Bargash refused and assembled an army, the Royal Navy sent five warships to the harbor in front of the palace and opened fire. For what did the British demand payment after the brief war was over? More… Discuss

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Just a thought: “For the state of affairs:……..but at least you’re not going to get scurvy…:


Just a Thought – “For the state of affairs: If life gives you lemons…you’re going to be hungry, and have a bitter-sour taste in your mouth all days and nights; but at  least you’re not going to get scurvy…”

This image shows a whole and a cut lemon.

This image shows a whole and a cut lemon. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: “BRITISH BANG” ON GERMAN ARCHIPELAGO (1947)


“British Bang” on German Archipelago (1947)

Heligoland is a pair of small German islands located in the North Sea, comprising the main island and the smaller island of Düne. The main island is commonly divided into three geographic sections, the last of which came into being in 1947, when the British Royal Navy detonated 6,700 tonnes of explosives on the island, actually changing its shape. The so-called British Bang was one of the largest non-nuclear single detonations in history. Why did the British bomb the island? More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE DREADNOUGHT HOAX (1910)


The Dreadnought Hoax (1910)

Nearly four years after the HMS Dreadnought entered service, the revolutionary battleship was “honored” with a visit from Abyssinian royalty. Though the ship’s commanders only received last-minute notice of the Abyssinian delegation’s impending arrival, they managed to arrange for their guests to be greeted with pomp and circumstance and then given a tour of the vessel. The royal visitors were later revealed to be mere pranksters in blackface. What now-famous author took part in the hoax? More… Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: AUSTRALIA DAY: BRITAIN’S FIRST FLEET ARRIVES (1788)


Australia Day: Britain’s First Fleet Arrives (1788)

On January 26, 1788, the first British fleet in modern-day Australia claimed it in the name of King George III. Captain Arthur Phillip and his band of British convicts settled in Port Jackson—where the city of Sydney was later established—and built a penal colony there to help relieve overcrowding in the British prisons. First officially celebrated in 1818, Australia Day—formerly known as Foundation Day or Anniversary Day—has been a public holiday since 1838. What was the British fleet called? More… Discuss

 

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This Day in the Yesteryear: THE ALTMARK INCIDENT (1940)


The Altmark Incident (1940)

While passing through neutral Norwegian waters during WWII, the German supply vessel Altmark was boarded by Norwegian inspectors. They were told the craft was merely a commercial ship, but it was in fact being used to transport 299 British prisoners of war. The captives tried to make their presence known by banging on the hull, but winches were run to drown them out. The Royal Navy, however, pursued the ship and mounted a rescue. What now-famous phrase alerted the men to their liberation? More… Discuss