Tag Archives: Royal Society

news: “Eugene” Passes Turing Test


“Eugene” Passes Turing Test

In 1950, British mathematician and computer theorist Alan Turing predicted that by 2000, a computer could be programmed so that after 5 minutes of questioning, the average interrogator would not have more than a 70% chance of telling whether he was talking to a machine or another person. The ability of a machine to carry on a conversation indistinguishable from that of a human, he contended, is the true measure of artificial intelligence. And while he was a little off on the timing, a computer program has finally passed the Turing test. Last Saturday, a program called Eugene Goostman convinced 33% of the judges at the Royal Society in London that it was human. More… Discuss

THE ARROW OF TIME


The Arrow of Time

Time is not perfectly symmetrical—if it were, a video of real events would seem realistic whether played forward or backward. British astronomer Arthur Eddington explored time’s perpetually forward motion with his “arrow of time” concept, developed around 1927. The arrow of time explains why humans have the sense that time is continuously moving from the known past to the unknown future. Though the future always seems to be something that one is moving toward, what is it really? More… Discuss

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: JAN SWAMMERDAM (1637)


Jan Swammerdam (1637)

Dutch naturalist Jan Swammerdam was a pioneer in the use of the microscope and made valuable contributions to the understanding of human anatomy and the future of anatomical study. He was the first person to observe and describe red blood cells, and he improved techniques for examining, preserving, and dissecting cadavers. However, his primary focus was the study of insects, many of which he described and drew in great detail. What led him to eventually abandon his scientific pursuits? More… Discuss

 

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