Tag Archives: San Francisco

this day in the yesteryear: Zoot Suit Riots Come to an End (1943)


Zoot Suit Riots Come to an End (1943)

Named for the style of clothing favored by the mainly Mexican-American victims of these clashes, the Zoot Suit Riots erupted between American servicemen stationed in Los Angeles, California, during World War II and the city’s minority residents. While the local press lauded the attacks by the servicemen and described them as having a “cleansing effect,” First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt denounced them as “race riots” rooted in discrimination. What happened to the nine sailors arrested in the riots? More… Discuss

The Winchester Mystery House


The Winchester Mystery House

The Winchester Mystery House is a famous California mansion that is reputed to be haunted. Sarah Winchester, the widow of a gun magnate, began building the Winchester Mystery House in 1884 after a medium advised her to construct a house to appease the ghosts of all those killed by Winchester rifles. Construction continued for 38 years, since Sarah Winchester believed that if she stopped working on the house, she would die. What significance does the number 13 have in the mansion? More… Discuss

From CNA: A modern-day St Francis? Archbishop works to rebuild Syrian Church amid destruction


.- A four-year civil war in Syria has left a mounting death toll and displaced millions of persons, but one bishop is staying to rebuild the Church in Aleppo, in the northwest corner of the country.

“The Church is living,” Melkite Archbishop Jean-Clement Jeanbart of Aleppo told CNA earlier this month. “Here, I am building, I am restoring, I am maintaining a lively Church in which every stone is a human being and who can be a witness, a testimony to the world.”

“I wondered if I am not copying St. Francis when he was working to rebuild the Church. It was crazy, nobody thought that he would succeed,” the archbishop noted. “And he succeeded because the Lord was with him.”

The four-year Syrian conflict being fought among the Assad regime and various rebel factions has devastated the country. More than 3.9 million refugees have fled to surrounding countries, and around 8 million Syrians are believed to have been internally displaced. The war’s death toll is currently around 220,000.

Outside countries and entities have taken advantage of the civil war, profiting from it through the arms trade or waiting for Syria to collapse so to move in and take power in the vacuum. Pope Francis has spoken out against the arms trade here and has been criticized for it, Archbishop Jeanbart noted.

Aleppo endured a terrible two-month siege by rebel forces last year. Its infrastructure has been devastated, and its residents endure great poverty.

Those who chose to stay face a myriad of challenges. Houses, businesses, schools, and hospitals have been damaged or destroyed in the war, leaving fathers without work, families without shelter, the sick without medical care, and children without education.

Thus it is an uphill battle to convince residents to stay and not re-settle elsewhere, Archbishop Jeanbart admitted. Syrians see the U.S. on television and think it a “paradise,” and want to move there. He has to convince them of the unseen difficulties that such a move might bring.

Words are not enough to convince people, however. The Church must act to help Christians who stay so once peace comes – and it will, the archbishop maintains – a stable Christian community is in place and Christians can have a seat at the peace negotiations.

“We want that we may have our rights,” he said. “We want that everybody may feel comfortable in the country.”

“What we want to do, and what I am looking for,” Archbishop Jeanbart said, “is to go to another position, a position looking positively to the future, trying to give them hope that the future of their country may be good, and will be better if they work and if they prepare themselves.”

The Church in Aleppo is working to meet the local needs. It provides thousands of baskets of food to needy families, 1,000 scholarships for students to attend Catholic schools, stipends to almost 500 fathers who have lost their business in the war, heating to houses in the wintertime, rebuilding homes damaged in the war and medical care for the needy since many government hospitals were destroyed in the fighting.

It’s a daunting task for an archbishop in his seventies. He admitted to initially wondering how he could do it.

“But when I began working on it, I felt that I was 50. Like if the Lord is pushing me to go ahead and helping me to realize this mission,” he said.

“I invest myself entirely. I have decided the consecrate the rest of my life to do that.”

Archbishop Jeanbart has been assisted in his efforts to serve the people of Aleppo by the international Catholic charity Aid to the Church in Need. The charity has ensured  a six month supply of medical goods for the city, and paid for repairs and fuel costs at the city’s schools, in addition to the rest of its work throughout Syria.

Archbishop Jeanbart maintained that another reason Christians need to stay in Syria is to be a light to people of other religions, especially Muslims. If the Christians leave, no one will be left to preach the Gospel in Syria.

“Perhaps the time has come to tell these people ‘Come, Christ is waiting for you.’ And many Muslims now, I must say, are wondering where should be their place? Are they in the right place? Are they perhaps supposed to rethink and review their choices? It will be wonderful if I told them we may have the freedom and the freedom of faith which would allow anyone to make his own choice freely.”

Critics of the Church in Syria have accused it of not immediately supporting the rebels in the name of freedom and democracy, the archbishop noted, and this is a false mischaracterization.

Christians are wary of regime change because they have seen what has happened in surrounding countries where fundamentalists took power in the Arab Spring and religious pluralism suffered as a result: there is “a feeling among Christians that they are afraid that the government may change and with the change of the government, they may lose their freedom … they are afraid to lose their freedom to express and to live their Christian life.”

He cited the success of the Islamic State, which in the power vacuum caused by the Syrian civil war has established a caliphate in eastern Syria and western Iraq where “many Christians were killed because they were Christian.”

Christians in Syria are, in fact, supportive of freedom and democracy, he said.

“They want to have a democratic regime where they may have all their freedom and where they may live tranquil but at the same time happy in the country,” he said.

“In any settlement,” he maintained, “the Christian must have the rights to be Christian in this country. And they should not become Muslims because the regime will be Muslim.”

“We want to have our rights and to live as free Christians in our country,” he said.

Tags: Syrian Civil War, Aid to the Church in Need, Aleppo, Melkite Archdiocese of Aleppo, Archbishop Jeanbart

2
 
Must read
 
1
 
Important
 
0
 
Finally
 
0
 
Worn
 
1

Biography: Pepe Romero, World Renouned Classic Guitar Player


Pepe Romero

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaPepe Romero (born March 8, 1944 in Málaga, Spain) is a world-renowned classical and flamenco guitarist. He is particularly famous for his outstanding technique and colorful musical interpretations on the instrument.

Pepe Romero
Pepe Romero 2000.JPG

Pepe Romero in 2000
Background information
Born March 8, 1944 (age 71)
Málaga, Spain
Genres Classical music, flamenco
Occupation(s) Guitarist, arranger
Instruments Guitar
Years active fl. ca. 1959 – present
Labels Philips Records
Associated acts The Romero Guitar Quartet
Website www.peperomero.com
Notable instruments
Torres 1856

Biography

As a soloist Pepe Romero has appeared in the United States, Canada, Europe, China, and many countries around the world with the Toronto, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago, Houston, Pittsburgh, Boston, San Francisco and Dallas Symphony Orchestras, as well as with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, the New York, Bogota and Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestras, the Boston Pops Orchestra, the Hong Kong Sinfonietta and the London Symphony Orchestra, the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, the Monte Carlo Philharmonic Orchestra, I Musici, the Zurich Chamber Orchestra, Philharmonia Hungarica, the Hungarian State Orchestra, the Spanish National Orchestra, the Spanish National Radio/Television Orchestra, L’Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, The New Moscow Chamber Orchestra, the Springfiled Orchestra, the Lausanne Chamber Orchestra, the American Sinfonietta and the Bournemouth Symphony. He has been a special guest at the festivals of Salzburg, Israel, Schleswig-Holstein, Menuhin, Osaka, Granada, Istanbul, Ravinia, Garden State, Hollywood Bowl, Blossom, Wolf Trap, Saratoga and Hong Kong.

Since his first recording (at the age of 15) he has recorded over 50 solo albums and 30 albums as part of the famed guitar quartet The Romeros. He has played for Presidents Carter and Nixon, the Queen of the Netherlands, the Prince of Wales and Pope John Paul II. He has numerous international recording awards to his credit and has received an Honorary Doctorate in Music from University of Victoria.

His contributions to the field of classical guitar have inspired a number of distinguished composers to write works specifically for him, including Joaquín Rodrigo, Federico Moreno Torroba, Rev. Francisco de Madina, Lorenzo Palomo, Michael Zearott, Enrique Diemecke, and Celedonio Romero.

Pepe Romero is the second son of Celedonio Romero, who was his only guitar teacher. His first professional appearance was in a shared concert with his father when Pepe was only seven years old. In 1957 Celedonio Romero left Franco‘s Spain for the United States with his family.

On February 11, 2000, King Juan Carlos I of Spain knighted Pepe Romero and his brothers, Celin and Ángel, into the Order of “Isabel la Catolica.” The official ceremony of this high honor took place at the USC Thornton School of Music, and included a gala performance by The Romeros with the Thornton Chamber Orchestra. He is currently Adjunct Professor of Classical Guitar at the Thornton School, where he was named “Distinguished Artist in Residence” in 2004.[1][2]

Although originally a classical guitarist, he is talented in Flamenco and a popular Flamenco performer. His most famous Flamenco-only album is called ¡Flamenco Fenómeno!

The Romero Guitar Quartet

The Romero Guitar Quartet

Related Stories:    HERE

https://euzicasa.wordpress.com/2015/05/08/pepe-romero-plays-fantasia-para-un-gentilhombre-by-joaquin-rodrigo-great-compositionsperformances/

picture of the day, The San Francisco Earthquake



The San Francisco Earthquake

A massive earthquake felt from Oregon to Los Angeles and as far inland as Nevada jolted San Francisco, Calif., at 5:12 a.m. on April 18, 1906. The earthquake caused severe damage and loss of life in the San Francisco Bay area, and a three-day fire spawned by the shaking reduced 4.7 square miles of the city to blackened ruins. Military officials estimated $400 million of damage and a total of 700-800 killed. Modern research estimates that closer to 3,000 of San Francisco’s 400,000 inhabitants lost their lives.

The photo captures a painter sitting amid earthquake rubble painting a picture of ruins of large building after the earthquake.

Photo: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.kTuHwCsJ.dpuf

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

April 14

1471   The Earl of Warwick, who fought on both sides in the War of the Roses, is killed at the Battle of Barnet with the defeat of the Lancastrians.
1543   Bartoleme Ferrelo returns to Spain after discovering a large bay in the New World (San Francisco).
1775   The first abolitionist society in United States is organized in Philadelphia.
1793   A royalist rebellion in Santo Domingo is crushed by French republican troops.
1828   The first edition of Noah Webster’s dictionary is published.
1860   The first Pony Express rider arrives in San Francisco with mail originating in St. Joseph, Missouri.
1865   President Abraham Lincoln is assassinated in Ford’s Theater by John Wilkes Booth.
1894   Thomas Edison’s kinetoscope is shown to the public for the first time.
1900   The World Exposition opens in Paris.
1912   The passenger liner Titanic–deemed unsinkable–strikes an iceberg on her maiden voyage and begins to sink. The ship will go under the next day with a loss of 1,500 lives.
1931   King Alfonso XIII of Spain is overthrown.
1945   American B-29 bombers’s damage the Imperial Palace during firebombing raid over Tokyo.
1953   The Viet Minh invade Laos with 40,00 troops in their war against French colonial forces.
1959   The Taft Memorial Bell Tower is dedicated in Washington, D.C.
1961   The first live broadcast is televised from the Soviet Union.
1969   The first major league baseball game is played in Montreal, Canada.
1981   America’s first space shuttle, Columbia, returns to Earth.
Born on April 14
1578   Philip III, king of Spain and Portugal (1598-1621).
1629   Christian Huygens, Dutch astronomer.
1866   Anne Mansfield Sullivan, teacher who educated Helen Keller.
1889   Arnold Toynbee, English historian.
1898   Harold Black, electrical engineer.
1904   Sir John Gielgud, British actor.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.Im9sHjIN.dpuf

this pressed for your information: California community college deserves hearing on accreditation: judge|Info24.us


SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – A college regulator violated the law by failing to give California’s largest community college a fair hearing before deciding to terminate its accreditation, according to a tentative court ruling on Friday.

The Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges had planned to withdraw accreditation from City College of San Francisco, citing a lack of financial accountability and other longstanding problems, none directly related to educational quality.

Lost accreditation would trigger funding cuts that would shutter the school, San Francisco’s only community college, with more than 50 academic programs and over 100 occupational disciplines, from nursing to culinary arts and aircraft mechanics.

The city of San Francisco sued, and a judge put the accreditation decision on hold pending a trial that took place last year.

via California community college deserves hearing on accreditation: judge.

History – The World of Journalism – William Randolph Hearst


The World of Journalism - William Randolph Hearst

The World of Journalism – William Randolph Hearst (several software were employed to create this collage: Brothers scanner, FastStone image editor, Irfan View Collage function)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
For other people named William Randolph Hearst, see William Randolph Hearst (disambiguation).
William Randolph Hearst
William Randolph Hearst cph 3a49373.jpg
Hearst in 1906, photograph by James E. Purdy
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York‘s 11th district
In office
March 4, 1903 – March 4, 1907
Preceded by William Sulzer
Succeeded by Charles V. Fornes
Personal details
Born April 29, 1863
San Francisco, California, U.S.
Died August 14, 1951 (aged 88)
Beverly Hills, California, U.S.
Political party Democratic Party (1896–1935)
Independence Party (1905–1910)
Municipal Ownership League (1904–05)
Spouse(s) Millicent Willson Hearst (1903–1951)
Relations Phoebe Apperson Hearst, mother
George Hearst, father
Patty Hearst, granddaughter
Anne Hearst, granddaughter
Lydia Hearst-Shaw, great-granddaughter
Amanda Hearst, great-granddaughter
Marion Davies, mistress
Children George Randolph Hearst (1904–1972)
William Randolph Hearst, Jr. (1908–1993)
John Randolph Hearst (1910–1958)
Randolph Apperson Hearst (1915–2000)
David Whitmire Hearst (1915–1986)
Residence Hearst Castle
San Simeon, California
Alma mater Harvard University
Occupation Businessman & publisher
Signature

William Randolph Hearst (/ˈhɜrst/;[1] April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper publisher who built the nation’s largest newspaper chain and whose methods profoundly influenced American journalism.[2] Hearst entered the publishing business in 1887 after taking control of The San Francisco Examiner from his father. Moving to New York City, he acquired The New York Journal and engaged in a bitter circulation war with Joseph Pulitzer‘s New York World that led to the creation of yellow journalism—sensationalized stories of dubious veracity. Acquiring more newspapers, Hearst created a chain that numbered nearly 30 papers in major American cities at its peak. He later expanded to magazines, creating the largest newspaper and magazine business in the world.

He was twice elected as a Democrat to the U.S. House of Representatives, and ran unsuccessfully for Mayor of New York City in 1905 and 1909, for Governor of New York in 1906, and for Lieutenant Governor of New York in 1910. Nonetheless, through his newspapers and magazines, he exercised enormous political influence, and was famously blamed for pushing public opinion with his yellow journalism type of reporting leading the United States into a war with Spain in 1898.

His life story was the main inspiration for the development of the lead character in Orson Welles‘s film Citizen Kane.[3] His mansion, Hearst Castle, on a hill overlooking the Pacific Ocean near San Simeon, California, halfway between Los Angeles and San Francisco, was donated by the Hearst Corporation to the state of California in 1957, and is now a State Historical Monument and a National Historic Landmark, open for public tours. Hearst formally named the estate La Cuesta Encantada (“The Enchanted Slope”), but he usually just called it “the ranch.”

Ancestry and early life

William R. Hearst was born in San Francisco to millionaire mining engineer, goldmine owner and U.S. senator (1886–91) George Hearst and his wife Phoebe Apperson Hearst.

His paternal great-grandfather was John Hearst, of Scots-Irish origin, who emigrated to America with his wife and six children in 1766 and settled in South Carolina. Their immigration to South Carolina was spurred in part by the colonial government’s policy that encouraged the immigration of Irish Protestants.[4] The names “John Hearse” and “John Hearse Jr.” appear on the council records of October 26, 1766, being credited with meriting 400 and 100 acres (1.62 and 0.40 km2) of land on the Long Canes (in what became Abbeville District), based upon 100 acres (0.40 km2) to heads of household and 50 acres (200,000 m2) for each dependent of a Protestant immigrant. The “Hearse” spelling of the family name never was used afterward by the family members themselves, or any family of any size. A separate theory purports that one branch of a “Hurst” family of Virginia (originally from Plymouth Colony) moved to South Carolina at about the same time and changed the spelling of its surname of over a century to that of the emigrant Hearsts.[5] Hearst’s mother, née Phoebe Elizabeth Apperson, was of Irish ancestry; her family came from Galway.[6] She was the first woman regent of University of California, Berkeley, funded many anthropological expeditions and founded the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology.

Following preparation at St. Paul’s School in Concord, New Hampshire, Hearst enrolled in the Harvard College class of 1885. While there he was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon, the A.D. Club (a Harvard Final club), the Hasty Pudding Theatricals, and of the Harvard Lampoon before being expelled for antics ranging from sponsoring massive beer parties in Harvard Square to sending pudding pots used as chamber pots to his professors (their images were depicted within the bowls).[7]

Publishing business

 An ad asking automakers to place ads in Hearst chain, noting their circulation.

Searching for an occupation, in 1887 Hearst took over management of a newspaper, the San Francisco Examiner, which his father received in 1880 as repayment for a gambling debt.[8] Giving his paper a grand motto, “Monarch of the Dailies,” he acquired the best equipment and the most talented writers of the time, including Ambrose Bierce, Mark Twain, Jack London, and political cartoonist Homer Davenport. A self-proclaimed populist, Hearst went on to publish stories of municipal and financial corruption, often attacking companies in which his own family held an interest. Within a few years, his paper dominated the San Francisco market.

New York Morning Journal

Early in his career at the San Francisco Examiner, Hearst envisioned running a large newspaper chain, and “always knew that his dream of a nation-spanning, multi-paper news operation was impossible without a triumph in New York.”[9] In 1895, with the financial support of his mother, he bought the failing New York Morning Journal, hiring writers like Stephen Crane and Julian Hawthorne and entering into a head-to-head circulation war with Joseph Pulitzer, owner and publisher of the New York World, from whom he “stole” Richard F. Outcault, the inventor of color comics, and all of Pulitzer’s Sunday staff as well.[10] Another prominent hire was James J. Montague, who came from the Portland Oregonian and started his well-known “More Truth Than Poetry” column at the Hearst-owned New York Evening Journal.[11]

When Hearst purchased the “penny paper,” so called because its copies sold for only a penny apiece, the Journal was competing with New York’s 16 other major dailies, with a strong focus on Democratic Party politics.[12] Hearst imported his best managers from the San Francisco Examiner and “quickly established himself as the most attractive employer” among New York newspapers. He was generous, paid more than his competitors, gave credit to his writers with page-one bylines, and was unfailingly polite, unassuming, “impeccably calm,” and indulgent of “prima donnas, eccentrics, bohemians, drunks, or reprobates so long as they had useful talents.”[13]

Hearst’s activist approach to journalism can be summarized by the motto, “While others Talk, the Journal Acts.”

Expansion

In part to aid in his political ambitions, Hearst opened newspapers in some other cities, among them Chicago, Los Angeles and Boston. The creation of his Chicago paper was requested by the Democratic National Committee, and Hearst used this as an excuse for Phoebe Hearst to transfer him the necessary start-up funds. By the mid-1920s he had a nation-wide string of 28 newspapers, among them the Los Angeles Examiner, the Boston American, the Atlanta Georgian, the Chicago Examiner, the Detroit Times, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, the Washington Times, the Washington Herald, and his flagship the San Francisco Examiner.

Hearst also diversified his publishing interests into book publishing and magazines; several of the latter are still in circulation, including such periodicals as Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping, Town and Country, and Harper’s Bazaar.

 Cartoonist Rogers in 1906 sees the political uses of Oz: he depicts William Randolph Hearst as the Scarecrow stuck in his own Ooze in Harper’s Weekly.

In 1924 he opened the New York Daily Mirror, a racy tabloid frankly imitating the New York Daily News, Among his other holdings were two news services, Universal News and International News Service, or INS, the latter of which he founded in 1909.[36] He also owned INS companion radio station WINS in New York); King Features Syndicate, which still owns the copyrights of a number of popular comics characters; a film company, Cosmopolitan Productions; extensive New York City real estate; and thousands of acres of land in California and Mexico, along with timber and mining interests.

Hearst’s father, US Senator George Hearst, had acquired land in the Mexican state of Chihuahua after receiving advance notice that Geronimo – who had terrorized settlers in the region – had surrendered. George Hearst was able to buy 670,000 acres (270,000 ha),[37] the Babicora Ranch, at 20–40 cents each because only he knew that they had become much more secure.[38] George Hearst was on friendly terms with Porfirio Díaz, the Mexican dictator, who helped him settle boundary disputes profitably. The ranch was expanded to nearly 1,000,000 acres (400,000 ha) by George Hearst, then by Phoebe Hearst after his death.[38][39] The younger Hearst was at Babicora as early as 1886, when, as he wrote to his mother, “I really don’t see what is to prevent us from owning all Mexico and running it to suit ourselves.”[37][40] During the Mexican Revolution, his mother’s ranch was looted by irregulars under Pancho Villa. Babicora was then occupied by Carranza’s forces. Phoebe Hearst willed the ranch to her son in 1919.[41] Babicora was sold to the Mexican government for $2.5 million in 1953, just two years after Hearst’s death.[42]

Hearst promoted writers and cartoonists despite the lack of any apparent demand for them by his readers. The press critic A. J. Liebling reminds us how many of Hearst’s stars would not have been deemed employable elsewhere. One Hearst favorite, George Herriman, was the inventor of the dizzy comic strip Krazy Kat; not especially popular with either readers or editors at the time of its initial publication, it is now considered by many to be a classic, a belief once held only by Hearst himself.

Two months before the Wall Street Crash of 1929, he became one of the sponsors of the first round-the-world voyage in an airship, the LZ 127 Graf Zeppelin from Germany. His sponsorship was conditional on the trip starting at Lakehurst Naval Air Station, NJ, so the ship’s captain, Dr. Hugo Eckener, first flew the Graf Zeppelin across the Atlantic from Germany to pick up Hearst’s photographer and at least three Hearst correspondents. One of them, Grace Marguerite Hay Drummond-Hay, by that flight became the first woman to travel around the world by air.[43]

The Hearst news empire reached a circulation and revenue peak about 1928, but the economic collapse of the Great Depression and the vast over-extension of his empire cost him control of his holdings. It is unlikely that the newspapers ever paid their own way; mining, ranching and forestry provided whatever dividends the Hearst Corporation paid out. When the collapse came, all Hearst properties were hit hard, but none more so than the papers; Furthermore, his now-conservative politics, increasingly at odds with those of his readers, only worsened matters for the once great Hearst media chain. Having been refused the right to sell another round of bonds to unsuspecting investors, the shaky empire tottered. Unable to service its existing debts, Hearst Corporation faced a court-mandated reorganization in 1937. From that point, Hearst was reduced to being merely another employee, subject to the directives of an outside manager.[25] Newspapers and other properties were liquidated, the film company shut down; there was even a well-publicized sale of art and antiquities. While World War II restored circulation and advertising revenues, his great days were over. Hearst died of a heart attack in 1951, aged eighty-eight, in Beverly Hills, California, and is buried at Cypress Lawn Memorial Park in Colma, California.

The Hearst Corporation continues to this day as a large, privately held media conglomerate based in New York City.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Randolph_Hearst

Rattlesnake Hilltop (Turnbull Canyon) Puente Hills, California August 3, 2013


Rattlesnake Hilltop (Turnbull Canyon) Puente Hills, California August 3, 2013

Pilots Exposed to Increased Skin Cancer Risk


Pilots Exposed to Increased Skin Cancer Risk

Piloting a prop plane at 30,000 feet for an hour exposes pilots to as much ultraviolet radiation as 20 minutes in a tanning bed, according to a new study. A dermatologic research team at Mount Zion Cancer Research Center at the University of California, San Francisco, reports that the incidence of melanoma among pilots and their crews is about twice that of the general population. As part of the study, the researchers tested an airplane windshield and found that it only protected against UV-B radiation, not UV-A radiation, which penetrates skin more deeply. More… Discuss

Jacqueline du Pré plays Schumann – Cello Concerto in A minor, Op. 129|NY Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein, conducting: great compositions/performances


Jacqueline du Pré plays Schumann – Cello Concerto in A minor, Op. 129 (1/2)

Jacqueline du Pré plays Schumann – Cello Concerto in A minor, Op. 129

(2/2)
**********************************************

Felix Mendelssohn – Octet in E-flat major, Op. 20, (1964) : great compositions/performances


Maurice Ravel – Introduction & Allegro for Harp, Flute, Clarinet & String Quartet(1905) : Great compositions/performances|Art by Jean-Léon Gérôme


Maurice Ravel – Introduction & Allegro for Harp, Flute, Clarinet & String Quartet(1905)

Horowitz plays Debussy L’isle joyeuse,: great compositions/performances


Horowitz plays Debussy L’isle joyeuse

this pressed for your right to know: Californian students vent fury at soaring cost of public universities | The FRANCE 24 Observers


20/11/2014 / UNITED STATES

Californian students vent fury at soaring cost of public universities

United States/students

Photo published on Twitter by @Tiffanydloftin.

Hundreds of students from all over California, unhappy with plans to raise tuition for the state’s public university system, held a raucous protest in San Francisco on Wednesday. They clashed with police and tried to stop a regent – a member of the board that governs the university system – from entering the building where the measure was being debated.

The video below shows students blocking the regent’s way. The regent starts to panic, and several police officers arrive to form a circle around him. They attempt to get him past the students, before giving up and ushering him away from the scene.

via Californian students vent fury at soaring cost of public universities | The FRANCE 24 Observers.

Ravel – Daphnis et Chloé, Suite n°2 (Seiji Ozawa),: GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES


Ravel – Daphnis et Chloé, Suite n°2 (Seiji Ozawa)

Today’s Birthday – December 2: Georges Seurat


Today’s Birthday:  December 2

Georges Seurat
1859–1891, French painter.

He devised the pointillist technique of painting in tiny dots of pure color. His method, called divisionism, was a systematic refinement of the broken color of the impressionists. His major achievements are his Baignade (Tate Gall., London), shown in the Salon des Independants in 1884, and his masterpiece, Un Dimanche à la Grande Jatte (Art Inst., Chicago), completed two years later. He died of pneumonia at 31. Seurat is recognized as one of the most intellectual artists of his time and was a great influence in restoring harmonious and deliberate design and a thorough understanding of color combination to painting at a time when sketching from nature had become the mode. Other examples of Seurat’s work are in the Barnes Foundation, Merion, Pa., and in the Louvre.

Bibliography:

See catalog (ed. by A. Blunt and R. Fry, 1965); drawings (ed. by R. L. Herbert, 1966); complete paintings, ed. by John Rewald and Henri Dorra (1988); biographies by John Russell (1985) and Pierre Courthion (1988).

Also Born on December 2

Inside Out | Official HD teaser trailer | Disney Pixar | June 18, 2015 (living as a Disney Character in America)


Inside Out | Official HD teaser trailer | Disney Pixar | June 18, 2015

#Giacomo_Puccini : né le 22 décembre 1858 en Toscane, il est mort le 29 novembre 1924 à Bruxelles en Belgique) — Stéphane Bergès (@Revizorsb)


GHEORGHIU & ALAGNA – La Bohème – Sono andati? (Final scene)

this day in the yesteryear: San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge Opens to Traffic (1936)


 

San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge Opens to Traffic (1936)

 

English: San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge at night
English: San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge at night (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

The “Bay Bridge” is a toll bridge linking the California cities of Oakland and San Francisco. About 280,000 vehicles cross it each day. San Francisco residents first recognized the need for a bridge spanning the San Francisco Bay during the Gold Rush when they found themselves cut off from the newly built railroad on the far side of the bay. However, construction of the span was delayed until 1933. Originally, the bridge was to be named after Governor James Rolph. What thwarted this plan? More… Discuss

Just a thought:  More than a bridge between places, any bridge starts in the human need to be connected, in touch in the easiest way, and for all reasons, starting and possibly ending with the spiritual!  – George-B

 

quotation: Liberty: One of imagination’s most precious possessions (The Devil’s Dictionary). Ambrose Bierce


Liberty: One of imagination’s most precious possessions.

Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914) Discuss

this pressed for your right to know: Photos: ‘Living On A Dollar A Day’ Features Stark Portraits of Humanity|NewsWeek


Filed Under: World

10_17_DollarDay_Cover

Living on a dollar a day seems nearly unfathomable, but roughly one in six people in our world do on a daily basis. For her work Living On A Dollar A Day, photographer Renée C. Byer teamed up with San Francisco nonprofit The Forgotten International and ventured to four continents to capture intimate stills of people affected by extreme poverty.

“For me it’s very important to go behind the scenes and into their home to find pieces of daily life that everyone can relate to,” Byers said in an interview with National Geographic. “So people aren’t seeing a photo that will push them away, but will pull them back into the scene. So they’re not being overwhelmed by the emotion, but they’re able to relate to the emotion. So that they can imagine themselves trying to live this life, and in some way, hopefully, they could help.”

via

Photos: ‘Living On A Dollar A Day’ Features Stark Portraits of Humanity | newsweek

today’s birthday: Chuck Berry (1926)


Chuck Berry (1926)

Berry was one of the most innovative musicians of the 1950s. His unique blues-derived guitar style and witty lyrics helped define the rock music genre and earned him one of the first spots in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. A dynamic performer, he is also known for his signature crouching and gliding “duck walk,” a move that has been imitated by many musicians. What legendary musician said, “If you tried to give rock and roll another name, you might call it ‘Chuck Berry'”? More… Discuss

this pressed-for youe right to know: Panic as jet’s cabin walls crack on flight to Dallas|via The Truth 24.com


Panic as jet’s cabin walls crack on flight to Dallas

SAN FRANCISCO — A Dallas-bound American Airlines flight that departed from San Francisco International Airport turned back and made an emergency landing after some of the cabin’s wall panels cracked loose, aviation and airlines officials said.
The captain of the Boeing 757 decided to turn around an hour into the flight to Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport because of a possible blown air duct, American Airlines spokesman Matt Miller said.

Flight 2293 departed from SFO shortly before 1 p.m. Monday and landed without incident about 2:15 p.m. No one on the plane with 184 passengers and six crew members was hurt, he said.

“The captain elected to return to San Francisco and landed the plane safely,” Miller said.

Even though the plane’s problem is related to pressurization, the cabin did not lose pressure and oxygen masks did not deploy, he said.

Flight attendants told passengers the problem was “cosmetic,” a passenger said.

Aviation safety experts agreed with that assessment and said that while it is disconcerting for passengers to see any piece of the plane break, the cabin’s wall panels are not part of the plane’s structure.

“The plastic wall has no meaning to the safety of the plane. They are there so you don’t have to look at the bare walls,” said Robert Ditchey, an aeronautical engineer with four decades of experience.

Wow! One of my Facebook friends James Wilson’s flight had to emergency land! The cabin depressurized!?!? Insane! pic.twitter.com/T3fe86xOOh

Ryan Eversley (@RyanEversley) October 13, 2014

“On the other hand, it’s not normal for this to happen to a side wall,” added Ditchey, a former U.S. Navy pilot. “Someone is going to have to fix this airplane.”

James Wilson, of Kyle, Texas, said he and his fellow passengers knew there was a problem within minutes after takeoff from San Francisco. Wilson, 32, an amateur race car driver returning from a competition in Northern California, said they felt the fuselage violently shake and heard popping noises coming from outside of the plane as it made its initial ascent.

Then they watched in horror and screamed for the flight attendants to come as interior panels on both sides of the aircraft pulled apart from the walls.

“It was the whole Row 14 on all sides, from the floor to the ceiling,” said Wilson, who was seated in the row right behind and felt a change in cabin pressure. “It sounded like it was popping and banging so loud at first I thought stuff was coming out of the overhead compartments.”

Crew members were “pulling the panels apart and looking for daylight behind there,” he said.

They landed safely at SFO and everyone is ok but jeez.. pic.twitter.com/tia49TMQ0t

via Panic as jet’s cabin walls crack on flight to Dallas.

 

quotation: “…I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move.” Robert Louis Stevenson


For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) Discuss

today’s birthday: James Lick (1796)


James Lick (1796)

A piano maker by training, Lick spent many years in South America before returning to the US in 1848. He settled in San Francisco, where he soon abandoned the piano-making trade in favor of real estate. Shortly after his arrival, gold was discovered in the region, and Lick made a fortune in the housing boom that followed. The wealthiest man in California at the time of his death, he left most of his estate to social and scientific causes. Under what scientific instrument is he buried? More… Discuss

this pressed from The Independent and MPR: Magnitude 6.0 earthquake hits San Francisco Bay Area in biggest quake since 1989 – Americas – World – The Independent


 

Magnitude 6.0 earthquake hits San Francisco Bay Area in biggest quake since 1989 – Americas – World – The Independent

A photo provided by Lyall Davenport shows damage to a building in Napa, Calif., early Sunday.

Strong Quake Causes Injuries, Damage, Outages In Northern Calif.by Scott Neuman August 24, 2014 7:20 AM ET (the two way breaking news from MPR)

.

today’s birthday: Jerry Garcia (1942)


Jerry Garcia (1942)

Garcia was the lead guitarist and vocalist of the psychedelic rock band the Grateful Dead. His inimitable improvisational playing style helped make the Grateful Dead one of the most popular touring bands in the country. Closely involved with the San Francisco hippie movement, Garcia became heavily addicted to drugs but decided to turn his life around after emerging from a diabetic coma in 1986. He was at a drug rehabilitation center when he died suddenly in 1995. What caused his death? More… Discuss

Isadora Duncan


Isadora Duncan

Duncan was a pioneer of modern dance. Though born in the US, she was never very popular there. It was in Europe where she achieved great acclaim. An innovator and liberator of expressive movement, Duncan rejected the conventions of classical ballet and gave lecture-demonstrations of what she called “the dance of the future.” Inspired by the drama of ancient Greece, she danced barefoot while wearing revealing Greek tunics and flowing scarves. How did her fondness for scarves lead to her death? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: ‘Ksan Celebrations


‘Ksan Celebrations

On Friday evenings in July and August, dances and accompanying songs are performed by the ‘Ksan, or Gitxsan, Indians in a longhouse in the Indian Village in Hazelton, British Columbia, Canada. The dances are said to go back to pre-history; they were revived in 1958, and the ‘Ksan dancers have since performed in New York City, San Francisco, Seattle, Kansas City, Missouri, and even Australia. Performers must be Git ‘Ksan, meaning “People of the ‘Ksan” (named after the nearby Skeena River). More… Discuss

Labor, Privatization And How To Defend Public Education: SF Forum


[youtube.com/watch?v=PllIoc2e54w]

Labor, Privatization And How To Defend Public Education: SF Forum
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PllIo…
On July 6, 2014 in San Francisco a forum was held titled
Labor, Privatization And How To Defend Public Education.
Speakers included
Kathleen Carroll, fired Commission On Teacher Credentialing, attorney & whistleblower
https://www.facebook.com/CitizensForE…
Rick Baum, member of CCSF AFT Local 2121;
George Wright, retired Professor AFT 1493;
Gray Brechin, UCB Geography Department, author of “Imperial San Francisco”
Sharon Higgins, researcher/expert on privatization of Oakland, CA schools and the Gulen charter chain.
http://charterschoolscandals.blogspot…
Billionaires from the Walton Walmart family to the Gates
Foundation, the Fisher GAP KIPP operation and the Broad
Foundation are spending fortunes pushing charters to loot
public education. The “Common Core” and testing schemes
profiting Pearson Inc. are part of the drive to totally privatize
public education. UC Regent Richard Blum and others with ties
to politicians are also benefiting financially from this transformation.
Politicians in California and nationally are actively supporting
privatization, the “Common Core” and charters to eliminate and
re-segregate our public schools.
At the same time in San Francisco privatizers are seeking to revoke
accreditation of the City College of San Francisco in order to
destroy the unions and privatize the largest community college
in California. This forum looks at how this privatization agenda
is being implemented and what our unions and the labor
movement need to do to fight it.
For further information by Kathy Carroll on this issue:
When Did Teacher Unions Decide to “TURN” Against Collective Bargaining Rights?
http://www.dailycensored.com/when-did…
Full video of UPWA Forum
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PllIo…
For more video from Kathy Carroll:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOCjDI…
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOCjDI…
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56SWb4…
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLa6YC…
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ux7F7…
For more information
https://www.facebook.com/CitizensForE…
Sponsored by United Public Workers For Action
http://www.upwa.info
Production of Labor Video Project http://www.laborvideo.org

 

news: @HiddenCash


@HiddenCash

A new Twitter trend is sweeping the globe. It started with one anonymous Twitter user with the handle @HiddenCash stashing money in various locations around San Francisco, California, and then tweeting clues to its whereabouts for followers to find, and in days sparked a slew of copycat accounts around the globe hosting similar cash hunts. The man who started it all claims to be a successful real estate investor who is trying to give back with this unconventional philanthropic campaign and inspire a movement of out-of-the-box charitable giving. So far, he seems to be doing just that. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

news: Maya Angelou Passes Away


Maya Angelou Passes Away

Legendary African-American poet and author Maya Angelou has passed away at the age of 86. She was an active campaigner for African-American civil rights, and her autobiographical works explore themes of economic, racial, and sexual oppression. She rose to prominence with I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1969) and had been recognized with honors and awards for her literary contributions ever since. She was the recipient of more than 30 honorary degrees as well as the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the US. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

WORD: FRAGRANCY


fragrancy 

Definition: (noun) A pleasingly sweet olfactory property.
Synonyms: redolencebouquetsweetness
Usage: The fragrancy of her perfume seemed to attract every man in the room, drawing them to her like flies to honey. Discuss.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

ARTICLE: SUSPENSION BRIDGES


Suspension Bridges

A suspension bridge, like San Francisco’s iconic Golden Gate Bridge, features a roadway suspended from vertical cables. Though an early version of the suspension bridge existed in 15th-century Tibet, the first Western design dates back to 16th-century Italy. While suspension bridges are ideal for spanning long distances, their tendency to vibrate during heavy winds can have devastating consequences. Which suspension bridge collapse—caused by severe winds—was caught on film in 1940? More… Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: John Adams – Common tones in simple time


Happy Birthday Mr. John Adams! 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

HERZ Henri-CAVATINE DE LA CENERENTOLA – Op.60-plays Milan JELEN.wmv


Henri Herz (Vienna, 6 January 1803 — Paris, 5 January 1888) was a pianist and composer, Austrian by birth, and French by domicile.

Herz was born Heinrich Herz in Vienna. He was Jewish by birth, although he asked the musical journalist Fétis not to mention this in the latter’s musical encyclopaedia,[1] perhaps a reflection of endemic anti-semitism in nineteenth-century French cultural circles.

As a child Herz studied with his father and in Coblenz with the organist Daniel Hünten. In 1816 he entered the Paris Conservatoire, where he studied under Victor Dourlen and Anton Reicha. His brother Jacques Herz (1794-1880) was a fellow-pupil at the Conservatoire, and also became a noted pianist and teacher
A celebrated pianist, Herz traveled worldwide, including tours in Europe, Russia, South America, and in the United States of America in 1846-50, where he concertised all the way to San Francisco, California, where his performances were compared to the more extravagant manner of Leopold de Meyer, concertising in the United States during the same period (1845-47)..[2] He wrote a book about his experiences abroad, Mes voyages en Amérique (Paris: Achille Faure, 1866).[3]
Herz taught at the Conservatoire (1842-74). (Of his pupils, only Marie-Aimée Roger-Miclos (1860-1950) recorded, in the early 1900s, for Dischi Fonotipia.)
In 1842 he built the Salle des Concerts Herz on the rue de la Victoire. This was used for performances by Berlioz and Offenbach.[4] In 1851 he founded his own piano factory in Paris
Herz composed many pieces including eight piano concertos. Among his many musical works, he was involved with the composition of Hexaméron (the fourth variation on Bellini’s theme is his). Many however found his piano style showy and shallow, and Robert Schumann was amongst those who criticized it.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compostions/Performances: Rhapsodie D’Auvergne for Piano and Orchestra By Saint-Saens


Rhapsodie D’Auvergne for Piano and Orchestra By Saint-Saens

(2008 Annual Concert at Glenn Gould Studio Toronto Soloist:Emily Pei’En Fan Conductor: Tony Fan with Chinese Artists Society of Toronto Youth Orchestra)

Saint-Saens: Later years

In 1886 Saint-Saëns debuted two of his most renowned compositions: The Carnival of the Animals andSymphony No. 3, dedicated to Franz Liszt, who died that year. That same year, however, Vincent d’Indyand his allies had Saint-Saëns removed from the Société Nationale de Musique. Two years later, Saint-Saëns’s mother died, driving the mourning composer away from France to the Canary Islands under the alias “Sannois”. Over the next several years he travelled around the world, visiting exotic locations in Europe, North Africa, Southeast Asia, and South America. Saint-Saëns chronicled his travels in many popular books using his nom de plume, Sannois.

In 1908, he had the distinction of being the first celebrated composer to write a musical score to a motion picture, The Assassination of the Duke of Guise (L’assassinat du duc de Guise), directed by Charles Le Bargy and André Calmettes, adapted by Henri Lavedan, featuring actors of the Comédie Française. It was 18 minutes long, a considerable run time for the day.

In 1915, Saint-Saëns traveled to San Francisco, California and guest conducted the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra during the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, one of two world’s fairs celebrating the completion of the Panama Canal.

Saint-Saëns continued to write on musical, scientific and historical topics, travelling frequently before spending his last years in AlgiersAlgeria. In recognition of his accomplishments, the government of France awarded him the Légion d’honneur.

Saint-Saëns died of pneumonia on 16 December 1921 at the Hôtel de l’Oasis in Algiers. His body was repatriated to Paris, honoured by state funeral at La Madeleine, and interred at Cimetière du Montparnasse in Paris.

Relationships with other composers

Saint-Saëns was either friend or enemy to some of Europe’s most distinguished musicians. He stayed close to Franz Liszt and maintained a fast friendship with his pupil Gabriel Fauré, who replaced him as organist and choirmaster when he retired. Additionally, he was a teacher and friend to Isidor Philipp, who headed the piano department at the Paris Conservatory for several decades and was a composer and editor of the music of many composers. But despite his strong advocacy of French music, Saint-Saëns openly despised many of his fellow-composers in France such as Franckd’Indy, and Massenet. Saint-Saëns also hated the music of Claude Debussy; he is reported to have told Pierre Lalo, music critic, and son of composer Édouard Lalo, “I have stayed in Paris to speak ill of Pelléas et Mélisande.” The personal animosity was mutual; Debussy quipped: “I have a horror of sentimentality, and I cannot forget that its name is Saint-Saëns.” On other occasions, however, Debussy acknowledged an admiration for Saint-Saëns’s musical talents.

Saint-Saëns had been an early champion of Richard Wagner‘s music in France, teaching his pieces during his tenure at the École Niedermeyer and premiering the March from Tannhäuser. He had stunned even Wagner himself when he sight-read the entire orchestral scores of LohengrinTristan und Isolde, andSiegfried, prompting Hans von Bülow to refer to him as, “the greatest musical mind” of the era. However, despite admitting appreciation for the power of Wagner’s work, Saint-Saëns defiantly stated that he was not an aficionado. In 1886, Saint-Saëns was punished for some particularly harsh and anti-German comments on the Paris production of Lohengrin by losing engagements and receiving negative reviews throughout Germany. Later, after World War I, Saint-Saëns angered both French and Germans with his inflammatory articles entitled Germanophilie, which ruthlessly attacked Wagner.[2]

Saint-Saëns edited Jean-Philippe Rameau‘s Pièces de clavecin, and published them in 1895 through Durand in Paris (re-printed by Dover in 1993).

On 29 May 1913, Saint-Saëns stormed out of the première of Igor Stravinsky‘s Le sacre du printemps (The Rite of Spring), allegedly infuriated over what he considered the misuse of the bassoon in the ballet’s opening bars.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: FIRST IPHONE ANNOUNCED (2007)


First iPhone Announced (2007)

Development of Apple’s iPhone began in 2004, when a team of about 1,000 employees began work on the highly confidential “Project Purple.” Their efforts fundamentally changed the cell phone industry and prompted the development of a host of increasingly advanced smartphones that essentially function as mobile computers. Apple CEO Steve Jobs unveiled the iPhone on January 9, 2007, at the Macworld Conference in San Francisco. What business did he prank-call as he tested features for the audience? More… Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

ARTICLE: THE SAN ANDREAS FAULT


The San Andreas Fault

Formed around 30 million years ago, California’s San Andreas Fault is a major zone of fractures in the Earth’s crust extending from San Francisco to San Diego. The fault causes several thousand earthquakes a year, but few are serious. It was first identified in northern California by geology professor Andrew Lawson in 1895. After the 1906 San Francisco quake, he discovered that the fault continues through southern California. What city along the fault regularly endures magnitude 6.0 temblors? More… Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: LOMA PRIETA EARTHQUAKE DISRUPTS WORLD SERIES (1989)


Loma Prieta Earthquake Disrupts World Series (1989)

Game 3 of the World Series between the San Francisco Giants and Oakland Athletics was scheduled to begin at 5:35 PM on October 17, 1989, but Mother Nature intervened. The Loma Prieta earthquake struck San Francisco at 5:04 PM with 60,000 fans already inside Candlestick Park. Due to the timing, it was the first major earthquake to be broadcast on live TV, and a blimp covering the game was able to coordinate emergency efforts. What did broadcaster Al Michaels say before the network feed was lost? More… Discuss

 

Doina Noua, ( gand poetic de George-B)


Doina Noua, ( gand poetic de George-B)

Si-am plecat la scurta oaste,

sa m-antorc  intord fara de coaste,
Si-am plecat hoinar, 

Si m-am facut armasar, 
armasar de prin ocol, fara-de  funie, far-de bici
sa tot fug in cercuri mici…

Si-am plecat la colindat, dar-de-a altii,
au uitat si de brazi si de icoana,
si de lumina-n ulei,
si de viata si de moarte,
si de zile-ntunecate, scurte, reci si plin-de jale…

Ca s-au pus pe jafu’ mare.

Debussy – Printemps, avec le choeur initialement prévu (1887)



En n’envoyant à l’Académie des Beaux-Arts, en 1887, qu’une partition pour piano à quatre mains et choeur de Printemps (suite symphonique en deux mouvements), son deuxième “envoi de Rome“, Debussy prétendit que la partition d’orchestre avait été détruite dans un incendie. Il semble plutôt qu’elle n’ait jamais existé. Et ce n’est qu’en 1912 que l’oeuvre fut orchestrée, mais par Henri Busser, qui fit abstraction du choeur. Ce qui incita beaucoup plus tard le chef d’orchestre américain Emil de Cou à réorchestrer Printemps en réintroduisant le choeur (sans paroles) prévu à l’origine. C’est cette version qu’on peut entendre ici, les interprètes étant The San Francisco Ballet Orchestra et The San Francisco Ballet Chorus, sous la direction d’Emil de Cou. 

– I. (00:00) Très modéré;
– II. (11:58) Modéré.

Live Stream of Today’s Show (from Democracy Now): Fear the Drones!


Live Stream of Today's Show (from Democracy Now)

Live Stream of Today's Show (from Democracy Now) (Click here to access and find out more about this fundamental issues)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramsey_Clark
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ann_Wright

Mama don’t allow hydrofranctling around here!

How authentic is your Sandwich (or the “Early” Sandwich)


The Right Honourable
The Earl of Sandwich
PC FRS
Secretary of State for the Northern Department
In office
19 December 1770 – 12 January 1771
Prime Minister Lord North
Preceded by The Earl of Rochdale
Succeeded by The Earl of Halifax
In office
9 September 1763 – 10 July 1765
Prime Minister George Grenville
Preceded by The Earl of Halifax
Succeeded by The Duke of Grafton
First Lord of the Admiralty
In office
1771–1782
Prime Minister Lord North
Preceded by Sir Edward Hawke
Succeeded by The Viscount Keppel
In office
1763–1763
Prime Minister The Earl of Bute
Preceded by George Grenville
Succeeded by The Earl of Egmont
In office
1748–1751
Prime Minister George Grenville
Preceded by The Duke of Bedford
Succeeded by The Lord Anson
Postmaster General
In office
1768–1771
Prime Minister The Duke of Grafton
Lord North
Preceded by The Marquess of Downshire
Succeeded by Henry Carteret
Personal details
Born 3 November 1718(1718-11-03)
Died 30 April 1792(1792-04-30) (aged 73)
Chiswick, England
Spouse(s) Dorothy Montagu, Countess of Sandwich
Martha Ray
Alma mater Eton College, Trinity College, Cambridge
Profession Statesman
Religion Anglican

John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich, PC, FRS (3 November 1718 – 30 April 1792)[1] was a British statesman who succeeded his grandfather, Edward John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich, PC, FRS (3 November 1718 – 30 April 1792)[1] was a British statesman who succeeded his grandfather, Edward Montagu, 3rd Earl of Sandwich, as the Earl of Sandwich in 1729, at the age of ten. During his life he held various military and political offices, including Postmaster General, First Lord of the Admiralty and Secretary of State for the Northern Department, but is perhaps best known for the claim that he invented the modern concept of the sandwich.

Read more about The Right Honorable at
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Montagu,_4th_Earl_of_Sandwich