Tag Archives: Schubert

Amazing Music/Performances: Schubert Piano Sonata No 9 in B, D575 Andras Schiff


Schubert Piano Sonata No 9 in B, D575 Andras Schiff

great compositions/performances: Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575


Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575

Best Classical Music, Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575, great compositions/performances


 


Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575

 

Happy Easter – AVE MARIA – Schubert


Happy Easter – AVE MARIA – Schubert

Best Classical Music-Historical musical bits:, Schubert / Emil Gilels / Amadeus Quartet, 1976: Piano Quintet in A major (“Trout”), great compositions/performances


Schubert / Emil Gilels / Amadeus Quartet, 1976: Piano Quintet in A major (“Trout”) – Complete

Historic musical Bits: W. Kempff plays Schubert Sonata in C minor, D.958, great compositions/performances


W. Kempff plays Schubert Sonata in C minor, D.958

Schubert – Overture in E minor, D. 648 , Prague Sinfonia, conducted by Christian Benda


Schubert – Overture in E minor, D. 648

Schubert – “String Quartet in E Major, Op. post. 125 Nr. 1, D-87 (November 1813 ?)- Amadeus String Quartet , great compositions/performances


Schubert –  “String Quartet in E Major, Op. post. 125 Nr. 1, D-87

(November 1813 ?)- Amadeus String Quartet 

Franz Liszt – 14 Schubert Lieder , great compositions/performances


Franz Liszt – 14 Schubert Lieder

Schubert: Piano Trio in E-flat major, Op. 100 , New England Conservatory


Schubert: Piano Trio in E-flat major, Op. 100

Schubert Symphony No 8 B minor Unfinished Unvollendete Claudio Abbado ,great compositions/performances


Schubert: 6 Moments Musical Op.94 (D780) Wilhelm Backhaus (1884-1969) Piano, great compositions/performances


Schubert: 6 Moments Musical Op.94 (D780)

(listen to more classical music at euzicasa: here  here here and many more)

Franz Schubert – Rondo A-Dur, D.438 (1816): Arcos Orchcestra, great compositions/performances


Franz Schubert – Rondo A-Dur, D.438 (1816)

Yo-Yo Ma plays Schubert: Arpeggione Sonata D821 for Cello & Piano -Emanuel Ax, piano: great compositions/performances


Schubert: Arpeggione Sonata D821 for Cello & Piano

Schubert – 4 Impromptus, D. 899 / Op. 90, Maria João Pires,: great compositions/performances


Schubert – 4 Impromptus, D. 899 / Op. 90 (Maria João Pires)

Schubert – Piano sonata D.664 – Richter London 1979: great compositions/performances


Schubert – Piano sonata D.664 – Richter London 1979

Schubert – Symphony no. 8 in B minor D 759 “Unfinished” (KARAJAN – Philarmonia Orchestra): great compositions/performances


Schubert – Symphony no. 8 in B minor D 759 “Unfinished” (KARAJAN – Philarmonia Orchestra)

Franz Schubert . Rosamunde, la princesse de Chypre: make music part of your life series


Franz Schubert . Rosamunde, la princesse de Chypre

Angela Gheorghiu: “Ständchen” by Franz Schubert: great compositions/performances


Angela Gheorghiu: “Ständchen” by Franz Schubert

Franz Schubert – Symphony No.2 in B-flat major, D.125 (1815): make music part of your life series



***from  KuhlauDilfeng2  KuhlauDilfeng2

Franz SchubertSymphony No.2 in B-flat major, D.125 (1815)

***Picture: Carlo Bossoli – Abendliches Vergnügen vor den Toren Konstantinopels

***Franz Schubert:  Symphony No.2 in B-flat major, D.125 (1815)

Mov.I: Largo – Allegro vivace 00:00
Mov.II: Andante 14:07
Mov.III: Menuetto: Allegro vivace 22:20
Mov.IV: Presto vivace 25:32

***Orchestra: Failoni Orchestra
***Conductor: Michael Halász

In the opening movement, the initial theme of the Allegro vivace is based on the corresponding first theme of Ludwig van Beethoven’s overture to The Creatures of Prometheus.

The second movement is a theme with five variations in E flat major. Although there is some variation in the melody, the primary focus of the variations are on instrumentation and tone color. The first variation features violins and winds. The second variation passes the theme between the low strings and the woodwinds. The third variation is again violins and winds. The fourth variation is in C minor and features some acceleration with the use triplet-sixteenth notes. The fifth variation maintains the triplet-sixteenths, but they move into the background with the melody returning close to its original form as a kind of recapitulation. A coda concludes the movement.

The minuet is in C minor and mainly scored for the tutti and fortissimo. The contrasting Trio in E flat major is more thinly scored winds, violins and pizzicato bass. The melody of the trio is actually a variation of the theme used in the second movement forming a melodic and harmonic (E-flat/C minor) link is made between the inner two movements.

The finale is a galop in fast 2/4 time.

***From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

List of compositions by Franz Schubert by genre

Schubert / Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D. 759 “Unfinished” (Mackerras): make music part of your life series



FROM:

Schubert / Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D. 759 “Unfinished” (Mackerras)

Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D. 759 “Unfinished” (1822):
1. Allegro moderato – 00:00
2. Andante con moto – 13:32

***Performed by Charles Mackerras and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment (1990).

***Painting: Wanderer in the Storm, Karl Julius von Leypold

Schubert Impromptu op. 142 No.3 B flat major: great compositions/performances


 FROM:

Schubert Impromptu op. 142 No.3 B flat major

 

Sviatoslav Richter plays Schubert Sonata D.575: Great compositions/performances


Sviatoslav Richter plays Schubert Sonata D.575

The Piano Sonata in B major, D. 575 by Franz Schubert is a sonata for solo piano, posthumously published as Op. 147. Schubert composed the sonata in August 1817.

Movements

I. Allegro ma non troppo (B major)

II. Andante (E major)

III. Scherzo: Allegretto – Trio (G major, D Major)

IV. Allegro giusto (B major)

 

Franz Schubert: String Quartet #10 in Eb Opp125/1 D 87 (make music part of your life series)


[youtube.com/watch?v=jTcu0Rnb3V0]

Franz Schubert: String Quartet #10 in Eb Opp125/1 D 87

 

 

 

make music part of your life series: Franz Schubert: Quartettsatz in C-moll, D. 703 and Antonín Dvořák:String Quartet No.14, Op.105


[youtube.com/watch?v=pXOp2wfBb4A]

Franz Schubert: Quartettsatz in C-moll, D. 703

Franz Schubert: Quartettsatz in C-moll, D. 703
The Quartettsatz in C-moll (English: Quartet Movement in C minor), D. 703 was composed by Franz Schubert in December 1820. It is the first movement, of a Twelfth String Quartet which Schubert never completed. In addition to the opening movement, Schubert also composed the first forty bars of a second movement marked Andante. The unfinished quartet is regarded as one of the first products of Schubert’s mature phase of composition.[1][2][3]

Structure

The composition consists of a single sonata form movement marked Allego assai and typical performances last around 10 minutes.

Antonín Dvořák:String Quartet No.14, Op.105

I. Adagio ma non troppo—Allegro appassionato
II. Molto vivace
III. Lento e molto cantabile
IV. Finale. Allegro non tanto

Shanghai Quartet

Weigang Li, violin
Yi-Wen Jiang, violin
Honggang Li, viola
Nicholas Tzavaras, cello

Alexander Kasser Theater
Montclair State University
1 Normal Avenue, Montclair, NJ 07043
3:00pm, April 12, 2013

Filmed and edited by Rodney Leinberger

make music part of your life series: Schubert – Das Forellen Quintett/Trout Quintet D.667 Op114 piano,violin,viola,cello & double-bass


[youtube.com/watch?v=g3k81__bwrM]

Schubert:Das Forellen Quintett/Trout Quintet D.667 Op114 piano,violin,viola,cello & double-bass

Franz Schubert: Das Forellen Quintett/Trout Quintet D.667 Opus 114 A Major Juhani Lagerspetz, Sini Simonen, Steven Dann, Franz Ortner, Michael Seifried at the 15th Esbjerg International Chamber Music Festival 2013. 25th August at South Denmark‘s Music Academy, SMKS, Esbjerg http://www.eicmf.dk EICMF is unique in Denmark as it invites artists to collaborate in new constellations, form new relationships, establish a foundation for exchange and annually act as a host for an international community of artists.

fabulous musical moments: Schubert / A. Brendel, 1961: Fantasy in C Major, D. 760 (Op. 15) – The Wanderer –


[youtube.com/watch?v=GvHA5HPEhx8]

Schubert / A. Brendel, 1961: Fantasy in C Major, D. 760 (Op. 15) – The Wanderer – 

Wanderer-Fantasie (German translation would Fantasy Traveller) is the popular name of the Opus 15 (D 760) in C major by Franz Schubert written in November 1822. This is a Fantasy for piano in the classical form of the sonata. There is strong correlation between movements, so this part is interpreted as a process of sonata with significant variations from the classical form.

great compositions/performances: Franz Schubert: 6 Moments Musical Op.94 (D780)


[youtube.com/watch?v=kj3ok01A7KU]

great compositions/performances:  Franz Schubert: 6 Moments Musical Op.94 (D780)

great compositions/performances - Shubert - 6 Moments Musicaux Op. 94, D790 Wilhelm Bachaus piano
great compositions/performances – Shubert – 6 Moments Musicaux Op. 94, D790 Wilhelm Bachaus piano (click to enlarge)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 
Menu
 
0:00
Performed by Raymond Smullyan

Problems playing this file? See media help.

Six moments musicaux, D 780 (Op. 94) is a collection of six short pieces for solo piano composed by Franz Schubert. The movements are as follows:

  1. Moderato in C major
  2. Andantino in A-flat major
  3. Allegro moderato in F minor
  4. Moderato in C-sharp minor
  5. Allegro vivace in F minor
  6. Allegretto in A-flat major

Along with the Impromptus, they are among the most frequently played of all Schubert’s piano music, and have been recorded many times. No. 3 in F minor has been arranged by Leopold Godowsky and others.

It has been said that Schubert was deeply influenced in writing these pieces by the Impromptus, Op. 7, of Jan Václav Voříšek (1822).[1][2]

They were published by Leidesdorf in Vienna in 1828, under the title “Six Momens [sic] musicals [sic]”. The correct French forms are now usually used – moments (instead of momens), and musicaux (instead of musicals). The sixth number was published in 1824 in a Christmas album under the title Les plaintes d’un troubadour.[2]

make music part of your life series: Franz Schubert: Rondo in A major D.438 for violin and strings


[youtube.com/watch?v=n78PRgJB3QE]

Franz Schubert: Rondo in A major D.438 for violin and strings

European Journey – The pulse of Europe: Austria
Slovenian Philharmonic String Quartet with guests
Oliver Dizdarević Škrabar – solo violin
Žiga Faganel – violin
Irina Kevorkova – violin
Maja Rome – viola
Gordana Keller Petrej – cello
Petar Brčarević – double bass

Slovenian Philharmonic – The Slavko Osterc Hall
September 23, 2012

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great compositions/performances: F. Schubert – Symphony No. 4 “Tragic” in C minor, D. 417 (Harnoncourt)


[youtube.com/watch?v=CnoI-sYtCOU]

F. SchubertSymphony No. 4 “Tragic” in C minor, D. 417 Conductor – Nikolaus Harnoncourt
Wiener Philharmoniker
Musikvereinssaal Wien

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The symphony has four movements (a performance lasts around 30 minutes.)
  1. Adagio molto – Allegro vivace
  2. Andante in A flat major
  3. Menuetto. Allegro vivace – Trio in E flat major
  4. Allegro

The Symphony No. 4 in C minor, D. 417, commonly called the Tragic (German: Tragische), was composed by Franz Schubert in April 1816.[1] It was completed one year after the Third Symphony, when Schubert was 19 years old. However, the work was premiered only on November 19, 1849, in Leipzig, more than two decades after Schubert’s death.[citation needed]

The title Tragic is Schubert’s own. It was added to the autograph manuscript some time after the work was completed.[1] It is not known exactly why he added the title, but the work is one of only two symphonies (the Unfinished Symphony is the other) which Schubert wrote in a minor key.

The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B-flat, 2 bassoons, 4 horns in A-flat, C and E-flat, 2 trumpets in C and E-flat, timpani and strings.

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great compositions/performances:Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575


[youtube.com/watch?v=obkheDWz9_w]

Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575

Franz Schubert:
Piano Sonata in B Major D575:
Mvt.I: Allegro ma non troppo 00:00
Mvt.II: Andante 08:04
Mvt.III: Scherzo. Allegretto 13:49
Mvt.IV: Allegro giusto 19:25

Wilhelm Kempff: piano

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUOR LIFE SERIES: Symphony No.3 in D-major, D.200 (1815)


[youtube.com/watch?v=FLlKgu1sx4s]

Franz Schubert – Symphony No.3 in D-major, D.200 (1815)

Picture: Carlo Bossoli – Paris Bourse

Mov.I: Adagio maestoso – Allegro con brio 00:00
Mov.II: Allegretto 09:35
Mov.III: Menuetto: Vivace 13:54
Mov.IV: Presto vivace 18:04

Orchestra: Failoni Orchestra

Conductor: Michael Halász

The Allegro con brio, which follows a broad introduction in a form which reminds us of the French Overture in two parts, the first slow and dramatic, the second more lyrical, is remarkable for its charm and the interplay of solo clarinet with syncopated strings, which developed pp from within the bounds of the style of chamber music to the larger sphere of the symphonic form. This is an extremely dramatic movement in sonata form. It owes much, as Michael Trapp points out in the liner notes of Günter Wand’s recording, to the influence of Rossini, whose music was quite popular at the time, particularly evident in the overture-like structure.

A delightful Allegretto in ternary form follows, full of grace and humor.

Then comes a high-spirited Minuet, which, with its accented up-beats, suggests a scherzo and a popular flavor due to this low and popular gesture, and is contrasted by a graceful Ländler-like trio.

The concluding Presto in tarantella rhythm is remarkable for its bold harmonic progressions and for its wealth of dynamic contrast. This movement is in sonata form with a looser conception.

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES:Schubert Impromptu op. 142 No.3 B flat major


[youtube.com/watch?v=8YFX-XQLToE]

Schubert Impromptu op. 142 No.3 B flat major – VALENTINA LISITSA

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Schubert Liszt Des Mädchens Klage “The Maiden’s Lament ” Valentina Lisitsa


[youtube.com/watch?v=wIhlB7sf8FY]

One of the saddest Schubert’s songs ever. Download on iTunes here : http://smarturl.it/LisitsaLiszt_iTu

Friedrich Schiller (1759-1805)
Der Eichwald braust, die Wolken ziehn,
Das Mägdlein sitzt an Ufers Grün,
Es bricht sich die Welle mit Macht, mit Macht,
Und sie seufzt hinaus in die finstre Nacht,
Das Auge von Weinen getrübet.
“Das Herz ist gestorben, die Welt ist leer,
Und weiter gibt sie dem Wunsche nichts mehr,
Du Heilige, rufe dein Kind zurück,
Ich habe gelebt und geliebet!”
Es rinnet der Tränen vergeblicher Lauf,
Die Klage, sie wecket die Toten nicht auf;
Doch nenne, was tröstet und heilet die rust
Nach der süßen Liebe verschwund’ner Lust,
Ich, die Himmlische, will’s nicht versagen.
“Laß rinnen der Tränen vergeblichen Lauf,
Es wecke die Klage den Toten nicht auf!
Das süßeste Glück für die trauernde Brust,
Nach der schönen Liebe verschwund’ner Lust,
Sind der Liebe Schmerzen und Klagen.”

The Eichwald roars, the draw clouds,
The maiden sits on the shore green,
It breaks down the shaft with mighty power,
And she sighs out into the dark night,
The Eye of wines dimmed with.
My heart is dead, the world is empty,
And again, they are desiring nothing more,
Holy one, call back your child,
I have lived and loved!
It rinnet the tears vain course,
The lawsuit, they stir not on the dead;
But say, what comforts and heals the rust
After the sweet love verschwund’ner desire
I, the Celestial, do not deny it.
“Let my tears vain course,
It calls to mind the lament the dead not on!
The Sweetest luck for the grieving chest,
After the beautiful love verschwund’ner desire
Are love and pain complaints.
(translation by Google Translator)

Music score is here: http://imslp.org/wiki/Des_M%C3%A4dche…)

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Relaxation Piano Music I – Chopin, Schubert, Handel, Brahms & Others



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https://www.facebook.com/Glen.P.Hoban

On G+ at:

https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/1047365…

A compilation of some of the more relaxing piano performances I’ve uploaded to YouTube. All pieces of music in this collection are played and recorded by myself. I’ve added in links/starting times for each piece in the collection, for those who wish to browse, or jump to a favourite spot. I have also added links to the original videos.

The pieces in this collection are:

Moment Musicaux #6 (Schuberthttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_iLv…
Handel’s Largo (9:58https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_iLv…
Bethena Waltz (Scott Joplin) (16:14https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zWlyc…
Waltz in #15 A Flat (Brahms) (23:46https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6K46…
Ave Maria (Schubert) (26:11https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ev9qW…
Waltz #2 (Brahms) (28:58https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjqjq…
Intermezzo in A Minor, Op. 116 #2 (Brahms) (31:44)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HeTLN…
Intermezzo Op. 76 #7 (Brahms) (35:31)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XCt_L…
Intermezzo In A minor Op. 118 #2 (Brahms) (39:38)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oaXUJ…
Intermezzo Op. 119 #2 (Brahms) (46:46)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=doySb…
Romanze (Brahms) (54:36https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HWJej…
Nocturne #2 (Chopin; yes, that is a typo in the title!) (59:11)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bS_Gu…
Nocturne #16 (Chopin) (1:04:38https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bS_Gu…
Nocturne #18 (Chopin) (1:10:07https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BjXUs…
Prelude #17 (Chopin) (1:16:52https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLKLL…
Prelude #23 (Chopin) (1:20:35https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Xhet…
Waltz #3 (Chopin) (1:21:43https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HTGlq…
Waltz #9 ‘(Chopin) (1:28:56https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O1Jax…
Prelude #4 (Chopin) (1:33:39https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VtXlD…
Arabesque #1 (Debussy) (1:36:05https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7-Tv…
Deep River (Samuel Taylor Coleridge Arr.) (1:41:42)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGPAU…

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Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven Sonata No. 8 in C minor, Op. 13 “Pathétique” Live – Valentina Lisitsa



Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven Sonata No. 8 in C minor Op. 13 “Pathétique” Live – Lisitsa

Special for my German fans! List of info for upcoming concerts in Deutschland in the next couple of weeks below . Munchen (Mar24), Stuttgart(Mar27), Heidelberg(Apr 7)
Do come ! For Beethoven and more :-)))
http://www.muenchenmusik.de/veranstal…
http://www.sks-russ.de/veranstaltunge…
http://heidelberger-fruehling.de/cont…

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Great Compositions/Performances: Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in A Major D664



Franz Schubert:
Piano Sonata in A Major D664:
Mvt.I: Allegro moderato 00:00
Mvt.II: Andante 10:41
Mvt.III: Allegro 15:14

Wilhelm Kempff: piano

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wilhelm Walter Friedrich Kempff (25 November 1895 – 23 May 1991) was a German pianist and composer. Although his repertoire included BachMozartChopinSchumannLiszt and Brahms, Kempff was particularly well known for his interpretations of the music of Ludwig van Beethoven and Franz Schubert, by both of whom he recorded complete sets of their piano sonatas[1] [2]. He is considered to have been one of the chief exponents of the Germanic tradition during the 20th century.[3]

Early life

 

Kempff was born in JüterbogBrandenburg, in 1895.[1] He grew up in nearby Potsdam where his father was a royal music director and organist at St. Nicolai Church. His grandfather was also an organist and his brother Georg became director of church music at the University of Erlangen. Kempff studied music at first at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik at the age of nine after receiving lessons from his father at a younger age. Whilst there he studied composition with Robert Kahn and piano with Karl Heinrich Barth[1] (with whom Arthur Rubinstein also studied). In 1914 Kempff moved on to study at the Viktoria gymnasium in Potsdam before returning to Berlin to finish his training.[1]

 

As a pianist

 

In 1917, Kempff made his first major recital, consisting of predominantly major works, including Beethoven’s Hammerklavier Sonata and Brahms Variations on a theme of Paganini.[1] Kempff toured very widely in Europe and much of the rest of the world. Between 1936 and 1979 he performed ten times in Japan (a small Japanese island was named Kenpu-san in his honor)[citation needed]. Kempff made his first London appearance in 1951 and his first in New York in 1964. He gave his last public performance in Paris in 1981, and then retired for health reasons (Parkinson’s Disease). He died in PositanoItaly at the age of 95, five years after his wife, whom he had married in 1926. They were survived by five children.[1]

 

Wilhelm Kempff recorded over a period of some sixty years. His recorded legacy includes works of SchumannBrahmsSchubertMozartBachLisztChopin and particularly, of Beethoven.[1]

 

He was among the first to record the complete sonatas of Franz Schubert, long before these works became popular. He also recorded two sets of the complete Beethoven sonatas (and one early, almost complete set on shellac 1926-1945), one in mono (1951–1956) and the other in stereo (1964–1965). He recorded the complete Beethoven piano concertos twice as well, both with the Berlin Philharmonic; the first from the early 1950s in mono with Paul van Kempen, and the later in stereo from the early 1960s with Ferdinand Leitner. Kempff also recorded chamber music with Yehudi MenuhinPierre FournierWolfgang SchneiderhanPaul Grummer, and Henryk Szeryng, among others.

 

The pianist Alfred Brendel has written that Kempff “played on impulse… it depended on whether the right breeze, as with an aeolian harp, was blowing. You then would take something home that you never heard elsewhere.” (in Brendel’s book, The Veil of Order). He regards Kempff as the “most rhythmical” of his colleagues. Brendel helped choose the selections for Phillip’s “Great Pianists of the 20th Century” issue of Kempff recordings, and wrote in the notes that Kempff “achieves things that are beyond him” in his “unsurpassable” recording of Liszt’s first Legende, “St. Francis Preaching to the Birds.”

 

Kempff (right) with Ernest Ansermet (left) in 1965

 

When pianist Artur Schnabel undertook his pioneering complete recording of the Beethoven sonatas in the 1930s, he told EMI that if he didn’t complete the cycle, they should have Kempff complete the remainder – even though the two pianists took noticeably different approaches to the composer (for example, Schnabel preferred extremely fast or slow tempos, while Kempff preferred moderate ones). Later, when Kempff was in Finland, the composer Jean Sibelius asked him to play the slow movement of Beethoven’s 29th Sonata, the Hammerklavier; after Kempff finished, Sibelius told him, “You did not play that as a pianist but rather as a human being.”[4]

 

Technique

 

As a performer he stressed lyricism and spontaneity in music, particularly effective in intimate pieces or passages. He always strove for a singing, lyrical quality. He avoided extreme tempos and display for its own sake. He left recordings of most of his repertory, including the complete sonatas of Beethoven and Schubert. He performed to an advanced age, concertizing past his eightieth birthday. His association with the Berlin Philharmonic spanned over sixty years.

 

As a teacher

 

From 1924 to 1929, Kempff took over the direction of the Stuttgart College of Music as a successor of Max Pauer. In 1931, he was co-founder of the summer courses at Marmorpalais Potsdam. In 1957, Kempff founded Fondazione Orfeo (today: Kempff Kulturstiftung) in the south-Italian city Positano and held his first Beethoven interpretation masterclass at Casa Orfeo, which Kempff had built especially for this reason. He continued teaching there once a year until 1982. After his death in 1991,Gerhard Oppitz taught the courses from 1992-1994 until John O’Conor took over. Oppitz and O’Conor had both been outstanding participants of Kempff’s masterclasses and were personally closely connected with Wilhelm Kempff.

 

Other noted pianists to have studied with Kempff include Jörg DemusNorman ShetlerMitsuko UchidaPeter SchmalfussIdil Biret and Carmen Piazzini.

 

Composition

 

A lesser-known activity of Kempff was composing. He composed for almost every genre and used his own cadenzas for Beethoven’s Piano Concertos 1-4. His student Idil Biret has recorded a CD of his piano works. His second symphony premiered in 1929 at the Leipzig Gewandhaus by Wilhelm Furtwängler. He also prepared a number of Bach transcriptions, including the Siciliano from the Flute Sonata in E-flat major, that have been recorded by Kempff and others.

 

Recordings

 

Among many others:

 

  • Beethoven: Piano Sonatas Nos. 1, 12, 19, and 20 (DG LP 138 935; released 1965; recipient of Grand Prix du Disque)
  • Schubert: The Piano Sonatas (complete), (DG 463 766-2 (seven compact disks)) recordings made in 1965, ’67, ’68, ’70.

 

Autobiogra

 

  • Kempff, Wilhelm. Unter dem Zimbelstern: Jugenderinnerungen eines Pianisten [“Under the Cymbal Star: The Development of a Musician” (1951)]. Laaber: Laaber Verlag, 1978.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Franz Schubert – String Quartet, in A minor, D 804 “Rosamunde”



Brandis Quartet, Thomas Brandis, violin. Peter Brem, violin. Wilfried Strehle, viola. Wolfgang Boettcher, cello. 
Franz Schubert – String Quartet, in A minor, D 804 “Rosamunde
I. Allegro ma non troppo
II. Andante
III. Menuetto, allegro
IV. Allegro moderato

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Franz Schubert – Symphony No.1 in D-major, D.82 (1813)



Picture: Carlo Bossoli – A Bustling Market on the Piazza Navona in Rome

Franz Schubert 

Work: Symphony No.1 in D-major, D.82 (1813)

Mov.I: Adagio – Allegro vivace 00:00
Mov.II: Andante 11:47
Mov.III: Menuetto: Allegretto 19:17
Mov.IV: Allegro vivace 23:30

Orchestra: Failoni Orchestra

Conductor: Michael Halász

The symphony is scored for 1 flute, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in D, 2 trumpets in D, timpani and strings. 

The orchestration, which is balanced between strings and winds, lends itself to small chamber orchestras, as well as larger ensembles. The trumpets are scored particularly high, as in many of Schubert’s early works. Trumpet players will find, in general, the tessitura sitting between a concert D to Concert A for most of the 1st and 4th movements. In the 4th movement, Schubert pushes them up to a high D, in a repeated fashion. 

Some careful planning is needed to balance the multiple doublings between horns and trumpets.

 

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D 957, No. 4 Standchen ~ Franz Schubert



Schwanengesang (“Swan song“) is the title of a posthumous collection of songs by Franz Schubert.

The tombstone of Franz Schubert

The tombstone of Franz Schubert (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Unlike the earlier Die schöne Müllerin and Winterreise, it uses poems by three poets, Ludwig Rellstab (1799–1860), Heinrich Heine (1797–1856) and Johann Gabriel Seidl (1804-1875). Schwanengesang has the number D 957 in the Deutsch catalogue.

The collection was named by its first publisher Tobias Haslinger, presumably wishing to present it as Schubert’s final musical testament to the world.

In the original manuscript in Schubert’s hand, the first 13 songs were copied in a single sitting, on consecutive manuscript pages, and in the standard performance order. Some[who?] claim that the last song, Taubenpost, text by Johann Gabriel Seidl (1804–1875), catalogue number D 965 A, is not part of the cycle as Schubert conceived it. However, it’s not clear that Schubert intended it to be a cycle at all, or if he did, that he completed it before he died. It may have been Tobias Haslinger, Schubert’s publisher, who conceived of it as a cycle, or attempted to finish an incomplete work by adding Taubenpost onto the end. So most people consider Haslinger’s published version ‘the’ version, and that’s how it’s performed today. Taubenpost is considered to be Schubert’s last Lied.

Franz Liszt later transcribed these songs for solo piano.

Schubert also set to music a poem named Schwanengesang by Johann Senn, unrelated to this collection (number D744 in the Deutsch catalogue). ~Taken from Wikipedia

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Horowitz plays : Schubert’s Impromptu in G flat major D899 No.3 (in Vienna)


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Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in A Minor D845, Op.42


The Piano Sonata in A minor, D. 845 (Op. 42) by Franz Schubert is a sonata for solo piano, composed in May 1825.

Piano Sonata in A Minor D845: 

I. Moderato, A minor 00:00

II. Andante poco moto, C major. (4 measures missing after measure 43) 8:06

III. Scherzo: Allegro vivace – Trio: Un poco più lento, A minor 17:13

IV. Rondo: Allegro vivace, A minor 23:58

The first movement is in sonata form though with ambiguity over the material in the development and the beginning of the recapitulation.[1]

The second movement is in variation form. Noted performers of the work in the 19th century included Hans von Bülow, who played the sonata in both Europe and the USA.[2]

Daniel Coren has discussed the nature of the recapitulation in the first movement of this sonata.[3]

Wilhelm Kempff: piano

 

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Franz Schubert – Piano Sonata in A major, D 664 (Op. 120)



Klára Würtz, piano.
Franz Schubert – Piano Sonata in A major, D 664, Op. 120 ( summer of 1819):
Movements
I. Allegro moderato, A major
II. Andante, D major
III. Allegro, A major

Well regarded among pianists, the “Little” A major sonata is so called to distinguish it from the hefty 1828 sonata in the same key. The manuscript, completed in July 1819, was dedicated to Josephine von Koller of Steyr in Upper Austria, whom he considered to be “very pretty” and “a good pianist.” The lyrical, buoyant, in spots typically poignant nature of this sonata fits the image of a young Schubert in love, living in a summery Austrian countryside, which he also considered to be “unimaginably lovely.”[1]

The A major sonata is straightforward, with a dulcet melodic opening. It was the first of Schubert’s piano sonatas where the sonata form as perfected by his idol, Beethoven, does not seem wrestled with; rather, it is a “joyous breakthrough,” a carefree triumph over strict rules of construction.[2]

The manuscript to this “little” sonata has been lost.[3]

Biography

Early life and education

Schubert was born in Himmelpfortgrund (now a part of Alsergrund), Vienna on January 31, 1797. His father, Franz Theodor Schubert, the son of a Moravian peasant, was a parish schoolmaster; his mother, Elisabeth Vietz, was the daughter of a Silesian master locksmith, and had also been a housemaid for a Viennese family prior to her marriage. Of Franz Theodor’s fourteen children (one illegitimate child was born in 1783),[1] nine died in infancy; five survived. Their father was a well-known teacher, and his school in Lichtental, a part of Vienna’s 9th district, was well attended.[2] He was not a musician of fame or with formal training, but he taught his son some elements of music.[3]

 

The house in which Schubert was born, today Nussdorfer Strasse 54, in the 9th district of Vienna.

At the age of five, Schubert began receiving regular instruction from his father and a year later was enrolled at his father’s school. His formal musical education also began around the same time. His father continued to teach him the basics of the violin,[3] and his brother Ignaz gave him piano lessons.[4] At 7, Schubert began receiving lessons from Michael Holzer, the local church organist and choirmaster. Holzer’s lessons seem to have mainly consisted of conversations and expressions of admiration[5] and the boy gained more from his acquaintance with a friendly joiner‘s apprentice who used to take him to a neighboring pianoforte warehouse where he had the opportunity to practice on better instruments.[6] He also played the viola in the family string quartet, with brothers Ferdinand and Ignaz on violin and his father on the cello. Schubert wrote many of his early string quartets for this ensemble.[7]

Schubert first came to the attention of Antonio Salieri, then Vienna’s leading musical authority, in 1804, when his vocal talent was recognized.[7] In October 1808, he became a pupil at the Stadtkonvikt (Imperial seminary) through a choir scholarship. At the Stadtkonvikt, Schubert was introduced to theovertures and symphonies of Mozart.[8] His exposure to these pieces and various lighter compositions, combined with his occasional visits to the opera set the foundation for his greater musical knowledge.[9]One important musical influence came from the songs of Johann Rudolf Zumsteeg, who was an importantLied composer of the time, which, his friend Joseph von Spaun reported, he “wanted to modernize”.[10]Schubert’s friendship with Spaun began at the Stadtkonvikt and endured through his lifetime. In those early days, the more well-to-do Spaun furnished the impoverished Schubert with manuscript paper.[9]

Meanwhile, his genius began to show in his compositions. Schubert was occasionally permitted to lead the Stadtkonvikt’s orchestra, and Salieri decided to begin training him privately in musical composition andtheory in these years.[11] It was the first germ of that amateur orchestra for which, in later years, many of his compositions were written. During the remainder of his stay at the Stadtkonvikt he wrote a good deal of chamber music, several songs, some miscellaneous pieces for the pianoforte and, among his more ambitious efforts, a Kyrie (D. 31) and Salve Regina (D. 27), an octet for wind instruments (D. 72/72a, said to commemorate the 1812 death of his mother),[12] a cantata for guitar and male voices (D. 110, in honor of his father’s birthday in 1813), and his first symphony (D. 82).[13]

Teacher at his father’s school

At the end of 1813, he left the Stadtkonvikt, and returned home for studies at the Normalhauptschule to train as a teacher. In 1814, he entered his father’s school as teacher of the youngest students. For over two years, the young man endured the drudgery of the work, which he performed with very indifferent success.[14] There were, however, other interests to compensate. He continued to receive private lessons in composition from Salieri, who did more for Schubert’s musical training than any of his other teachers. Salieri and Schubert would part ways in 1817.[11]

In 1814, Schubert met a young soprano named Therese Grob, the daughter of a local silk manufacturer. Several of his songs (Salve Regina and Tantum Ergo) were composed for her voice, and she also performed in the premiere of his first Mass (D. 105) in September[15] 1814.[14] Schubert intended to marry Grob, but was hindered by the harsh marriage consent law of 1815,[16] which required the ability to show the means to support a family.[17] In November 1816, after failing to gain a position at Laibach, Schubert sent Grob’s brother Heinrich a collection of songs, which were retained by her family into the 20th century.[18]

Schubert’s most prolific year was probably 1815. He composed over 20,000 bars of music, more than half of which was for orchestra, including nine church works, a symphony, and about 140 Lieder.[19] In that year, he was also introduced to Anselm Hüttenbrenner and Franz von Schober, who would become his lifelong friends. Another friend, Johann Mayrhofer, was introduced to him by Spaun in 1814.[20]

Supported by friends

 

Josef Abel(?) portrait of an anonymous young man with glasses (possibly Schubert)

Significant changes happened in 1816. Schober, a student of good family and some means, invited Schubert to room with him at his mother’s house. The proposal was particularly opportune, for Schubert had just made the unsuccessful application for the post of Kapellmeister at Laibach, and he had also decided not to resume teaching duties at his father’s school. By the end of the year, he became a guest in Schober’s lodgings. For a time, he attempted to increase the household resources by giving music lessons, but they were soon abandoned, and he devoted himself to composition. “I compose every morning, and when one piece is done, I begin another.”[21] During this year, he focused on orchestral and choral works, although he also continued to write Lieder.[22] Much of this work was unpublished, but manuscripts and copies circulated among friends and admirers.[23]

In early 1817, Schober introduced Schubert to Johann Michael Vogl, a prominent baritone twenty years Schubert’s senior. Vogl, for whom Schubert went on to write a great many songs, became one of Schubert’s main proponents in Viennese musical circles. He also met Joseph Hüttenbrenner (brother to Anselm), who also played a role in promoting Schubert’s music.[24] These, and an increasing circle of friends and musicians, became responsible for promoting, collecting, and, after his death, preserving, his work.[25]

In late 1817, Schubert’s father gained a new position at a school in Rossau (not far from Lichtental). Schubert rejoined his father and reluctantly took up teaching duties there. In early 1818, he was rejected for membership in the prestigious Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde, something that might have furthered his musical career.[26] However, he began to gain more notice in the press, and the first public performance of a secular work, an overture performed in February 1818, received praise from the press in Vienna and abroad.[27]

Schubert spent the summer of 1818 as music teacher to the family of Count Johann Karl Esterházy at their château in Zseliz (then in Hungary, now in Slovakia). His duties were relatively light (teaching piano and singing to the two daughters, Marie and Karoline), and the pay relatively good. As a result, he happily continued to compose during this time. It may have been at this time that he wrote one of his now world-famous compositions, the Marche militaire No. 1 in D major. On his return from Zseliz, he took up residence with his friend Mayrhofer.[26] The respite at Zseliz led to a succession of compositions for piano duet.[28]

The tight circle of friends that Schubert surrounded himself with was dealt a blow in early 1820. Schubert and four of his friends were arrested by the Austrian secret police, who were suspicious of any type of student gatherings. One of Schubert’s friends, Johann Senn, was put on trial, imprisoned for over a year, and then permanently banned from Vienna. The other four, including Schubert, were “severely reprimanded”, in part for “inveighing against [officials] with insulting and opprobrious language”.[29] While Schubert never saw Senn again, he did set some of his poems, “Selige Welt” and “Schwanengesang”, to music. The incident may have played a role in a falling-out with Mayrhofer, with whom he was living at the time.[30]

Musical maturity

The compositions of 1819 and 1820 show a marked advance in development and maturity of style[31]. The unfinished oratorio “Lazarus” (D. 689) was begun in February; later followed, amid a number of smaller works, by the 23rd Psalm (D. 706), the Gesang der Geister (D. 705/714), the Quartettsatz in C minor (D. 703), and the “Wanderer Fantasy” for piano (D. 760). Of most notable interest is the staging in 1820 of two of Schubert’s operas: Die Zwillingsbrüder (D. 647) appeared at the Theater am Kärntnertoron June 14, and Die Zauberharfe (D. 644) appeared at the Theater an der Wien on August 21.[32]Hitherto, his larger compositions (apart from his masses) had been restricted to the amateur orchestra at the Gundelhof, a society which grew out of the quartet-parties at his home. Now he began to assume a more prominent position, addressing a wider public.[32] Publishers, however, remained distant, withAnton Diabelli hesitantly agreeing to print some of his works on commission.[33] The first seven opus numbers (all songs) appeared on these terms; then the commission ceased, and he began to receive the meager pittances which were all that the great publishing houses ever accorded to him. The situation improved somewhat in March 1821 when Vogl sang “Der Erlkönig” at a concert that was extremely well received.[34] That month, he composed a variation on a waltz by Anton Diabelli (D. 718), being one of the fifty composers who contributed to Vaterländischer Künstlerverein.

The production of the two operas turned Schubert’s attention more firmly than ever in the direction of the stage, where, for a variety of reasons, he was almost completely unsuccessful. In 1822, Alfonso und Estrella was refused, partly owing to its libretto.[35] Fierrabras (D. 796) was rejected in the fall of 1823, but this was largely due to the popularity of Rossini and the Italian operatic style, and the failure of Carl Maria von Weber‘s Euryanthe.[36] Die Verschworenen (D. 787) was prohibited by the censor (apparently on the grounds of its title),[37] and Rosamunde (D. 797) was withdrawn after two nights, owing to the poor quality of the play for which Schubert had written incidental music. Of these works, the two former are written on a scale which would make their performances exceedingly difficult (Fierrabras, for instance, contains over 1,000 pages of manuscript score), but Die Verschworenen is a bright attractive comedy, and Rosamunde contains some of the most charming music that Schubert ever composed. In 1822, he made the acquaintance of both Weber and Beethoven, but little came of it in either case. Beethoven is said to have acknowledged the younger man’s gifts on a few occasions, but some of this is likely legend and in any case he could not have known the real scope of Schubert’s music – especially not the instrumental works – as so little of it was printed or performed in the composer’s lifetime. On his deathbed, Beethoven is said to have looked into some of the younger man’s works and exclaimed, “Truly, the spark of divine genius resides in this Schubert!”[38] but what would have come of it if he had recovered we can never know.

 

Schubert in 1825 (watercolor by Wilhelm August Rieder)

…read more here

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Schubert – Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D. 759 “Unfinished” (Performed by Charles Mackerras and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment (1990))



Franz Schubert (1797-1828):
Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D. 759 “Unfinished” (1822)
1. Allegro moderato – 00:00 
2. Andante con moto – 13:32
Performed by Charles Mackerras and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment (1990).
Painting: Wanderer in the Storm, Karl Julius von Leypold

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Franz Schubert – Piano Trio No. 1 in B flat major, D 898 (Op. 99)



Israel Piano Trio, Alexander Volkov, piano. Menahem Breuer, violin. Marcel Bergman, cello.

Franz Schubert – Piano Trio No. 1 in B flat major, D 898 (Op. 99)
I. Allegro moderato
II. Andante un poco mosso
III. Scherzo
IV. Rondo, allegro vivace

Great Performances: Schubert (Perenyi, Schiff) – Sonata in A minor Arpeggione D821


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The work consists of three movements. A typical performance takes just over 20 minutes.

  1. Allegro moderato
  2. Adagio in E major
  3. Allegretto in A major

The Sonata in A minor for Arpeggione and Piano, D. 821, was written by Franz Schubert in Vienna in November 1824. The sonata is the only substantial composition for the arpeggione (which was essentially a bowed guitar) which remains extant today. It belongs to the same period as theDeath and the Maiden Quartet, when Schubert was suffering from the advanced stages of syphilis and lapsing into increasingly frequent episodes of depression.

Fabulous Compositions/Composers: Franz Schubert – 6 Moment Musicaux, D 780


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Six moments musicauxD 780 (Op. 94) is a collection of six short pieces for solo piano composed by Franz Schubert. The movements are as follows:

  1. Moderato in C major
  2. Andantino in A-flat major
  3. Allegro moderato in F minor
  4. Moderato in C-sharp minor
  5. Allegro vivace in F minor
  6. Allegretto in A-flat major

Along with the Impromptus, they are among the most frequently played of all Schubert’s piano music, and have been recorded many times. No. 3 in F minor has been arranged by Leopold Godowsky and others.

It has been said that Schubert was deeply influenced in writing these pieces by the Impromptus, Op. 7, of Jan Václav Voříšek (1822).[1][2]

They were published by Leidersorf in Vienna in 1828, under the title “Six Momens [sic] musicals [sic]”. The correct French forms are now usually used – moments(instead of momens), and musicaux (instead of musicals). The sixth number was published in 1824 in a Christmas album under the title Les plaintes d’un troubadour.[2]

 

Schubert – Notturno in E flat major, Op. 148, D. 897



Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Notturno in E flat major, Op. 148, D. 897

Written c. 1827.

Suk Trio:
Josef Suk, violin
Jan Panenka, piano
Josef Chuchro, cello

Recorded in 1964. Re-release from 1979.

ClassicalRecords is a Youtube channel where I upload some excellent performances from the LPs in my collection. I’m uploading these LPs because they are either not available on CD, out of print on CD, or just difficult to find.

 

Franz Schubert: Rondo for Violin & Orchestra in A D 438



Austrian composer Franz Schubert (1797-1828) was one of the great composers of the classical era in music that is associated with Vienna, the others being Mozart, Haydn, and Beethoven
Schubert, who was born in a suburb of Vienna, was the fourth son of a schoolmaster. At age 5, he learned the violin from his father and the piano from an older brother. Because of Schubert’s excellent voice, at age 11 he became one of the Vienna Choir Boys at the Imperial Chapel. By the age of 16, Schubert wrote an opera, a series of quartets, and his Symphony No. 1

Shortly afterward, he left Vienna’s Imperial Chapel and began teacher training to become a schoolmaster. However, Schubert’s genius lay in musical creativity, and between 1813 and 1818 he had a surge of creativity where he wrote five symphonies, six operas, and 300 “Lieder” songs, a term which is usually used to describe songs composed to a German poem. 

While in the midst of all this creative composing, Schubert found teaching in a classroom to be too boring and in 1816 at age 19 he gave up teaching at the schoolhouse of his father and moved to Vienna where he devoted himself to composition, focusing on orchestral and choral works. During this creative activity, Schubert’s health deteriorated. He died at the age of thirty-one after a brief unconfirmed illness. 

Rondo in A for Violin and Strings was written in June 1828, and may well have been intended to form a two-movement sonata along the lines of Beethoven’s E minor Sonata

It is lovingly modeled on the lyrical finale of Beethoven’s sonata: his theme follows a similar harmonic pattern, and even the keyboard layout of its opening bars, with the melody’s initial phrase followed by a more assertive answer in octaves, echoes Beethoven’s. 

Schubert mirrors Beethoven’s procedure, too, by transferring the final reprise of the Rondo theme to the sonorous tenor register, with a continuous pattern of semiquavers unfolding above it. 

But Schubert’s composition is far from a slavish imitation, and it can more than hold its own against Beethoven’s. Particularly beautiful is the manner in which one of the important subsidiary themes returns towards the end, surmounted by a shimmering pianissimo accompaniment in repeated chords from the primo player. 

Rondo in A for Violin and Strings was published in December 1828, less than a month after Schubert died.

Rondo in A for Violin and Strings
Performed by the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra
Pinchas Zukerman, Conductor

 

Great Performances: Schubert _ The Poet of Romantic Music_ Symphony.9 Sawallisch/Wiener Philharmoniker


The Symphony No. 9 in C major, D. 944, known as the Great (published in 1840 as “Symphony No. 7 in C Major”,[1] listed as No. 8 in the Neue Schubert-Ausgabe[2]), is the final symphony completed by Franz Schubert. Originally called The Great C major to distinguish it from his Symphony No. 6, the Little C major,[3] the subtitle is now usually taken as a reference to the symphony’s majesty. A typical performance takes around 55 minutes, though it can be played in as little as 45 minutes by employing a faster tempo and not repeating sections as indicated in the score.
For a long time, the symphony was believed to be a work of Schubert’s last year, 1828. It was true that, in the last months of his life, he did start drafting a symphony – but this was the work in D major now accepted as Symphony No. 10, which has been realized for performance by Brian Newbould.[4] In fact, we now know that the ‘Great’ was largely composed in sketch in the summer of 1825: that, indeed it was the work to which Schubert was referring in a letter of March 1824 when he said he was preparing himself to write ‘a grand symphony’. By the spring or summer of 1826 it was completely scored, and in October, Schubert, who was quite unable to pay for a performance, sent it to the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde with a dedication. In response they made him a small payment, arranged for the copying of the orchestral parts, and at some point in the latter half of 1827 gave the work an unofficial play-through (the exact date and the conductor are unknown) – though it was considered too long and difficult for the amateur orchestra of the conservatory.[5]
File:Schubert's Letter on 944.jpg