Tag Archives: Seasonal affective disorder

The Monarch Butterfly


 

 

 

 

The Monarch Butterfly

 

 

 

English:

English: (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The monarch, with its distinctive orange and black pattern, is considered one the world’s most beautiful butterflies. In North America, thousands of monarchs gather in autumn and migrate southward, sometimes more than 1,800 miles (2,900 km), and return north in spring. Their ability to return to the same spots over several generations has led scientists to research how circadian rhythm and the position of the sun are involved. What is aposematism, and how do monarch butterflies exemplify it? More…

 

 

 

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Why Some Get SAD


Why Some Get SAD

Seasonal affective disorder, or SAD, is a form of depression most often experienced in winter, when exposure to sunlight is limited. Although the mechanism of the disorder is not entirely understood, researchers are closing in on its causes. Data show that people with SAD have higher evening and nighttime levels of serotonin transporter (SERT) protein during the winter months than do healthy volunteers. SERT carries serotonin, a neurotransmitter that helps regulate mood, back into nerve cells where it is not active, so these higher SERT levels could conceivably account for the “winter blues.” More… Discuss