Tag Archives: sergei rachmaninoff

historic musical bits, Vladimir Horowitz plays Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No.3 (live 1978), great compositions/performances


Vladimir Horowitz plays Rachmaninov Piano Concerto No.3 (live 1978)

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Sergei Rachmaninoff – All-Night Vigil – Op. 37


Sergei Rachmaninoff – All-Night Vigil – Op. 37

Sergei Rachmaninoff – Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43


Valentina Lisitsa si pianul fermecat: Rachmaninoff Rhapsody on theme of Paganini Lisitsa Baltic Youth Philharmonic Berlin Philharmonie , great compositions/performances


Great Compositions/performances:

Rachmaninoff Rhapsody on theme of Paganini Lisitsa Baltic Youth Philharmonic Berlin Philharmonie

Sviatoslav Richter plays Rachmaninoff Concerto No.1, Op. 1: great compositions/performances


Sviatoslav Richter plays Rachmaninov Concerto No.1, Op.1

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 6 “Pathetique”, Op. 74 (Fedoseyev),: great compositions/performances


P. I. TchaikovskySymphony No. 6 “Pathetique”, Op. 74 (Fedoseyev)

Rachmaninoff Prelude in g minor op. 23 #5 HQ Valentina Lisitsa Valentina Lisitsa|great compositions/performances


Rachmaninoff Prelude in g minor op. 23 #5 HQ

Pacific Chorale sings Rachmaninov Vespers: Rejoice, O Virgin: great compositions/performances


Pacific Chorale sings Rachmaninov Vespers: Rejoice, O Virgin

Sergei Rachmaninoff -Symphonic Dances, Op. 45: great compositions/performances


Sergei Rachmaninoff –Symphonic Dances, Op. 45

Y. Savchuk – National Academic Choir of Ukraine ‘Dumka’: Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vespers Op. 37 (make music part of your life series)



Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vespers Op. 37

Chopin Variations Op 2 (1-2) HQ, valentina Lisitsa: great compositions/performances



from   ValentinaLisitsa  ValentinaLisitsa

Chopin Variations Op 2 (1-2) HQ

Valentina Lisitsa, Black & Pink DVD.”La ci darem la mano”

Aleksandr Glazunov: Symphony no.6 op.58 (Gennadij Rozhdestvenskij, conductor): make music part of your life series


Aleksandr Glazunov: Symphony no.6 op.58 (Gennadij Rozhdestvenskij, conductor)

Parts/Movements

  1. Adagio – Allegro passionato
  2. Tema con varazioni
  3. Intermezzo. Allegretto
  4. Finale. Andante maestoso

Review :

While the Symphony No. 6 in C minor, Op. 58, of 1896 by Alexander Glazunov is not the most personally characteristic of his eight completed symphonies — the optimistic Third or the Olympian Fifth are more typical of his confident symphonic aesthetic — it is arguably the most typically Russian of his symphonies. Part of the reason for this is the scoring — violins in octaves above massed brass at its climaxes à la Tchaikovsky and gorgeously colorful woodwind writing in its central movements — part of it is the themes — ardent and powerful with a yearning quality characteristic of fin de siècle Russian symphonies — but most of it is the furious tone of the opening movement.
******With the darkly unfolding Adagio leading into a Allegro appassionato that balances a passionately despairing first theme with a fervently supplicating second theme, Glazunov’s Sixth sounds like a Russian symphony composed after the death of Tchaikovsky. But the Sixth is more than the work of a symphonic epigone. While the tone of the opening movement sounds typically Russian, its chromatic melodic and cogent harmonic structure makes it sound much more modern than contemporary symphonies by Kalinnikov or even Rachmaninov. Even more modern are the Sixth’s second and fourth movements.
******The second movement is a theme and seven variations that slowly transmutes the tone of the symphony from the fury of the opening movement to one of calm acceptance.
******The brief third-movement Intermezzo that precedes the Finale is lighter in tone than anything else in the symphony.
******The Finale itself is one of Glazunov’s most successful closing movements. With its magisterial Andante maestoso introduction announcing the chorale theme that will ultimately cap the movement, its highly contrasted themes — the first confidently striding in the winds Moderato maestoso, the second a lilting Scherzando theme for the flutes, horns, and strings — the Finale seems at first too episodic to cohere. Glazunov’s superb technical skills, however, form all the Finale’s material into an organic whole and the tone of the Finale — powerfully positive — is altogether Glazunov’s own. ~ James Leonard, Rovi

Read more:
               http://www.answers.com/topic/symphony-no-6-in-c-minor-op-58#ixzz3AkekJ1oA

               http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/artists/5a0988a4-695c-4bff-bc68-4f312427495e.html
              http://www.allmusic.com/composition/symphony-no-6-in-c-minor-op-58-mc0002366895

 

Sergei Rachmaninoff – Scherzo in D minor (V. Polyansky – Russian State SO): make music part of your life series



From:  Wolfgang Amadé Mozart  Wolfgang Amadé Mozart

Sergei Rachmaninoff – Scherzo in D minor (V. Polyansky – Russian State SO)

Rachmaninov – Suite for two pianos n°1 – Rudenko / Lugansky: make music part of your life series



From:

Rachmaninov – Suite for two pianos n°1 – Rudenko / Lugansky

Sergei Rachmaninov:  Suite for two pianos n°1 op.5:

I. Allegretto. Barcarolle 0:00
II. Adagio sostenuto. La nuit… L’amour 7:35
III. Largo di molto. Les larmes 13:53
IV. Allegro maestoso. Pâques 19:24

Vadim Rudenko
Nikolai Luganski
Live recording, Moscow

Chopin Etude Op 25 No.11 HQ – Valentina Lisitsa: great performances


Chopin Etude Op 25 No.11 HQ

 FROM:

make music part of your life series: Sergei Rachmaninoff – Études-Tableaux, Op. 39


[youtube.com/watch?v=ng9eIIv4XOA]

Sergei RachmaninoffÉtudes-Tableaux, Op. 39

N. Lugansky, piano

Rachmaninoff, in his later years, toured the U...

Rachmaninoff, in his later years, toured the United States extensively, and became an American citizen shortly before his death. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

No. 1, in C minor
No. 2, in A minor
No. 3, in F sharp minor
No. 4, in B minor
No. 5, in E flat minor
No. 6, in A minor
No. 7, in C minor
No. 8, in D minor
No. 9, in D major

 

 

Fabulous performances: Valentina Lisitsa Plays Sergei Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto #2 in c Op.18


[youtube.com/watch?v=uBpyjUd_8Qk]

Valentina Lisitsa – Rachmaninoff – Piano Concerto Nº 3 in D Minor, Op.30 (Part 1 of 5)

 Orquesta de la Ciudad de los Reyes
Director: Pablo Sabat
 
Auditorio del Colegio Santa Ursula
Lima – Peru, 10 Diciembre 2009

make music part of your life series: Kayla Wong Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 2 Part 4


[youtube.com/watch?v=bMO3M5YY4BE]

Kayla Wong Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 2 Part 4

http://www.kaylawong.net

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Great Compositions/Performances: Schumann Kinderszenen Op 15 – Valentina Lisitsa


[youtube.com/watch?v=Aq8LDUCw6sg]

Schumann Kinderszenen Op 15 – Valentina Lisitsa Haskil Argerich Horowitz Bosendorfer

 

First edition title page

Kinderszenen (German pronunciation: [ˈkɪndɐˌst͡seːnən]; original spelling Kinderscenen, “Scenes from Childhood“), Opus 15, by Robert Schumann, is a set of thirteen pieces of music for piano written in 1838. In this work, Schumann provides us with his adult reminiscences of childhood. Schumann had originally written 30 movements for this work, but chose 13 for the final version.[1] Robert Polansky has discussed the unused movements.[2]

Nr. 7, Träumerei, is one of Schumann’s best known pieces; it was the title of a 1944 German biographical film on Robert Schumann.[3] Träumerei is also the opening and closing musical theme in the 1947 Hollywood film Song of Love, starring Katharine Hepburn as Clara Wieck Schumann.[4]

Schumann had originally labeled this work Leichte Stücke (Easy Pieces). Likewise, the section titles were only added after the completion of the music, and Schumann described the titles as “nothing more than delicate hints for execution and interpretation”.[5] Timothy Taylor has discussed Schumann’s choice of titles for this work in the context of the changing situation of music in 19th century culture and economics.[6]

In 1974, Eric Sams noted that there was no known complete manuscript of Kinderszenen

Movements
Title Key Play
1. Von fremden Ländern und Menschen
Of Foreign Lands and Peoples
G major
 
Menu
 
0:00
2. Kuriose Geschichte
A Curious Story
[8]
D major
 
Menu
 
0:00
3. Hasche-Mann
Blind Man’s Bluff
B minor
 
Menu
 
0:00
4. Bittendes Kind
Pleading Child
D major
 
Menu
 
0:00
5. Glückes genug
Happy Enough
D major
 
Menu
 
0:00
6. Wichtige Begebenheit
An Important Event
A major
 
Menu
 
0:00
7. Träumerei
Dreaming
F major
 
Menu
 
0:00
8. Am Kamin
At the Fireside
[9]
F major
 
Menu
 
0:00
9. Ritter vom Steckenpferd
Knight of the Hobbyhorse
C major
 
Menu
 
0:00
10. Fast zu ernst
Almost Too Serious
G-sharp minor
 
Menu
 
0:00
11. Fürchtenmachen
Frightening
E minor
 
Menu
 
0:00
12. Kind im Einschlummern
Child Falling Asleep
E minor
 
Menu
 
0:00
13. Der Dichter spricht
The Poet Speaks
G major
 
Menu
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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Sergei Rachmaninoff – Suite No. 2 for two pianos, Op. 17


[youtube.com/watch?v=rLRNsj22c2U]

Sergei RachmaninoffSuite No. 2 for two pianos, Op. 17

Pianos:  J. Thorson, J. Thurber

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Fabulous Musical Moments: Mozart Concerto No. 20 in D Minor K466 Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa


[youtube.com/watch?v=FBVITUka_30]

Mozart Concerto D Minor K466 Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa

Filmed live May 20, 2012, Freiburg im Breisgau ,Germany
Cadenzas by Mozart’s favorite student – and billiards pal, Jan Nepomuk Hummel 🙂 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa plays Rachmaninoff’s Variation 18 Rhapsody on Themes of Paganini Valentina Lisitsa


[youtube.com/watch?v=yTyiwtfpO8s]
Live footage from the recording session. London Symphony Orchestra , Michael Francis conducting. The recording is available now on Decca. Get yours today! 🙂
iTunes: http://smarturl.it/paganinirhapsody
Amazon: http://smarturl.it/LisitsaPaganini

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Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa: Live from Sweden: Dress rehearsal Rachmaninoff Concerto #2 (NORRKÖPINGS SYMFONIORKESTER – Michael Francis conducting)


English: Pianist Valentina Lisitsa during an i...

English: Pianist Valentina Lisitsa during an interview in Leiden, Netherlands Deutsch: Pianistin Valentina Lisitsa während eines Interviews in Leiden, Holland (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

***Great Compositions/Performances:
     Valentina Lisitsa: Live from Sweden: Dress rehearsal Rachmaninoff Concerto #2 (NORRKÖPINGS SYMFONIORKESTER – Michael Francis conducting)

 

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Rachmaninoff Variation 18 Rhapsody on Themes of Paganini Valentina Lisitsa


Live footage from the recording session. London Symphony Orchestra , Michael Francis conducting. The recording is available now on Decca. Get yours today! 🙂
iTuneshttp://smarturl.it/paganinirhapsody
Amazon: http://smarturl.it/LisitsaPaganini

 

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Sergei Rachmaninoff – Prelude Op. 23



S. Rodriguez

Sergei Rachmaninoff – Prelude Op. 23
No. 1, in F-sharp minor
No. 2, in B-flat major
No. 3, in D minor
No. 4, in D major
No. 5, in G minor
No. 6, in E-flat major
No. 7, in C minor
No. 8, in A-flat major
No. 9, in E-flat minor
No. 10, in G-flat major

 

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Rachmaninoff – Vocalise For Violin



Title : Sergei Rachmaninov, Vocalise (Songs (14), Op. 34: no 14)
From Wikipedia,Vocalise, Op. 34 No. 14 is a song by Sergei Rachmaninoff, published in 1912 as the last of his Fourteen Songs, Opus 34. Written for voice (soprano or tenor) with piano accompaniment, it contains no words, but is sung using any one vowel (of the singer‘s choosing). It was dedicated to soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.
Although the original publication stipulates that the song may be sung by either soprano or tenor voice, it is usually chosen to be performed by a soprano. As with many classical vocal pieces, it is transcribed in a variety of keys, allowing the performer to choose a vocal range more suitable to their natural voice, so that artists who may not have the higher range of a soprano can nevertheless perform the song. When sung by a tenor, it is sung an octave lower than the same key when sung by a soprano.

 

VLADIMIR HOROWITZ – MASTER OF RACH 3 OPUS 30 [1909]


Sergei Rachmaninoff [1873-1943]

Konzert für Klavier und Orchester Nr. 3 in d-Moll op. 30 

I. Allegro ma non tanto [0:49]
II. Intermezzo: Adagio [17:24]
III. Finale: Alla breve [28:11]

Vladimir Horowitz, Klavier

New York Philharmonic Orchestra 

Zubin Metha, Leitung

Sunday, September 26, 1977

Rachmaninoff’s fatherly insights and advice regarding his own music were to prove invaluable to Horowitz. For Rachmaninoff, Horowitz was a champion of both his solo works and his Third Concerto, about which Rachmaninoff remarked publicly after the performance that “This is the way I always dreamed my concerto should be played, but I never expected to hear it that way on Earth.”

In 1985, in the movie The Last Romantic, Horowitz said: “Rachmaninoff is a pianist. I played with him [Arturo Toscanini, who is also mentioned in the conversation], Rachmaninoff and we… [plays the beginning of 3rd piano concerto]. He was a wonderful pianist and a nice friend. He was my best friend! First of all he was composer, pianist and conductor. Three things at once and first class, all three, I think so.

 

Chopin- Waltz no. 7 in C sharp minor, Op. 64 no. 2



Waltz no. 7 in C sharp minor
Opus 64 no. 2
Frederic Chopin

Performed by Philippe Entremont

 

Fabulous Compositions: Aram Khachaturian – Spartacus – Adagio



Aram KhachaturianSpartacusAdagio
Performed by Vienna Philharmonic

 

Sergei Rachmaninoff – Piano Concerto No. 3 in D minor, Op. 30


[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuGGaUdwpJg]
Earl Wild – Jascha Horenstein – Royal Philharmonic Orchestra

Sergei RachmaninoffPiano Concerto No. 3 in D minor, Op. 30
I. Allegro
II. Intermezzo, adagio
III. Finale, allegro

 

Horowitz, Schubert Impromptu op. 90 n° 4 in A flat major



Vladimir Horowitz, the last romantic”, 1985 filmed recital in his living room with his wife Wanda Toscanini-Horowitz.

1. Bach-Busoni, Chorale in G minor “Nun Komm der Heiden Heiland
2. Mozart, Sonata in C major K330
3. Schubert, Impromptu op. 90 n° 4 in A flat major
4. Chopin, Mazurka op. 17 n° 4 in A minor
5. Chopin, Scherzo n° 1 in B minor
6. Liszt, Consolation n° 3 in D flat major
7. Rachmaninoff, Prelude op. 32 n° 12 in G sharp minor
8. Schumann, Novelette op. 21 in F major
9. Scriabin, Etude op. 2 n° 1 in C sharp minor
10. Chopin, Polonaise op. 53 in A flat major
11. Chopin, Etude op. 10 n° 5 “Black keys”
12. Moszkowski, Etude in F major
13. Liszt, “Au bord d’une source

 

Mozart Concerto D Minor K466 Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa



Filmed live May 20, 2012, Freiburg im Breisgau ,Germany
Cadenzas by Mozart‘s favorite student – and billiards pal, Jan Nepomuk Hummel 🙂 

 

Valentina in Norrköping – drinking coffee, talking pianos, playing Rachmaninoff…



Short video report about my concert last week with Norrköping Symphony Orchestra . We do more Rachmaninoff this season eith them – #2 and #3 with a run-out in Stockholm. The schedule here :http://www.norrkopingssymfoniorkester…

 

Schubert Arpeggione Sonata in A minor D. 821 : Alexandre Debrus, cello & Alexander Mogilevsky, piano



Franz Schubert
Arpeggione sonata in A minor D. 821

1. Allegro moderato 14’20
2. Adagio 04’03
3. Allegretto 11’27

Alexandre Debrus, cello
Alexander Mogilevsky, piano

From the CD “Pavane Records” ref.: ADW 7541

http://www.alexandredebrus.com

Alexandre Debrus was born in 1976, into a family of musicians, his father Raoul Debrus and his mother Eliane Debrus-Boucher, were respectively lead viola and cello to the RTBF Symphony Orchestra in Belgium. At the age of four he started to play the cello under the guidance of his mother. He was studying with Luc Dewez (Mons and Waterloo in Belgium), Mischa Maisky (Siena), Mark Drobinsky (Siena and Paris), Yvan Monighetti (Basel) and Mstislav Rostropovich (Beloeil in Belgium). He gives numerous concerts in Belgium, France, Switzerland, Germany, Serbia, Italy, Spain, Greece, the United States, Russia, Argentina, Japan and to China. He recorded 19 CD as soloist and with chamber music ensemble under different labels, such as Pavane Records, BMG-RCA, Victor Read Seal, EMI Classics and Artès Classics. Continue reading

Valentina Lisitsa plays for passengers at St Pancras International Station (from the musical front)



While Valentina Lisitsa was busy in the UK with promotion for Rachmaninov, there were some problems with bad weather so her Eurostar train back to Paris had to be cancelled and she ended up stuck at St Pancras International for some time! However, the delay did not deter her from taking to one of the station’s Street Pianos and performing for passers-by in the station!

Order on Amazon: http://smarturl.it/LisitsaRachmaninov
Download on iTuneshttp://smarturl.it/RachConcertosLisitsa

 

Rachmaninoff Concerto No.3 “Solo” Version 1st mov. (with ossia Cadenza ) Valentina Lisitsa



If you think this is fun, I can’t wait for you to hear the 
REAL DEAL 🙂 With Orchestra ! With London Symphony 🙂
It is released today in digital. Be the first to hear it !
Amazon US http://tinyurl.com/aakjorf
Amazon UK http://tinyurl.com/bdr9us7
iTunes US https://itunes.apple.com/album/rachma…
A message in a bottle for anybody who worried it’s too fast, please check Rachmaninoff playing his own 3rd Concerto :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oA0kXD…
Admittedly he was supposed to know which tempos he wanted for this piece 🙂
FROM WIKIPEDIA:

The first movement revolves around a diatonic melody that soon develops into complex pianistic figuration. The second theme opens with quiet exchanges between the orchestra and the piano before fully diving into a slower theme in a major key. The first part of the first theme is restated before the movement is pulled into a loud development section which opens with toccata like quavers in the piano and reaches a loud chordal section. The whole development exhibits features similar to a canon, such as an eighth note passage in the piano in which the left hand and the right hand play overlapping figures. The movement reaches a number of ferocious climaxes, especially in the cadenza. Rachmaninoff wrote two versions of this cadenza: the chordal original, which is commonly notated as the ossia, and a second one with a lighter, toccata-like style. Both cadenzas lead into a quiet solo section including the flute, clarinet and horn accompanied by delicate arpeggios in the piano. The piano then restates the first theme in its entirety and closes with a tutti, silent, rippling coda reminiscent of the second theme.

 

Sergei Rachmaninoff – Scherzo in D minor



V. Polyansky – Russian State SO

 

Paganini Rhapsody (Rachmaninoff) – Arthur Rubinstein –


Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini
Op. 43 in A minor
Sergei Rachmaninoff

Soloist: Arthur Rubinstein
Conductor: Alfred Wallenstein