Tag Archives: siciliana

make music part of your life series: Gabriel Faure, Pelleas and Melisande Suite, Op. 80


[youtube.com/watch?v=s3nPyn23-Ec]

Gabriel Faure, Pelleas and Melisande Suite, Op. 80

GABRIEL FAURE: Pelleas and Melisande Suite, Op. 80:

1. Prelude – 00.10
2. Entr’acte: La Fileuse – 06.20
3. Sicilienne de Pelleas et Melisande – 09.20
4. La mort de Melisande – 13.10

Sinfonietta Sofia Orchestra,  conductor Christo Pavlov
New Concert Hall, 01 Oct 2011

Sofia, Bulgaria

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Fauré at about the time of his Pelléas et Mélisande music

Pelléas et Mélisande, Op. 80 is a suite derived from incidental music by Gabriel Fauré for Maurice Maeterlinck‘s play of the same name. He was the first of four leading composers to write music inspired by Maeterlinck’s drama. Debussy, Schoenberg and Sibelius followed in the first decade of the 20th century.

Fauré’s music was written for the London production of Maeterlinck’s play in 1898. To meet the tight deadline of the production, Fauré reused some earlier music from incomplete works and enlisted the help of his pupil Charles Koechlin, who orchestrated the music. Fauré later constructed a four-movement suite from the original theatre music, orchestrating the concert version himself.

History

 

The score was commissioned in 1898 by Mrs Patrick Campbell for the play’s first production in English, in which she starred with Johnston Forbes-Robertson and John Martin-Harvey.[n 1] Mrs Campbell had invited Debussy to compose the music, but he was busy working on his operatic version of Maeterlinck’s play, and declined the invitation.[2] Debussy in his letter said: “j’aimerai toujours mieux une chose où, en quelque sorte, l’action sera sacrifiée à l’expression longuement poursuivie des sentiments de l’âme. Il me semble que là, la musique peut se faire plus humaine, plus vécue, que l’on peut creuser et raffiner les moyens d’expression” (“I will always prefer a thing in which, in a way, the action is sacrificed for the expression sought after by the soul. It seems to me that in that case, the music is more human, more lived, that we can refine our means of expression”).[3]

 

 

Fauré was in London in March and April 1898, and was introduced to Mrs Campbell by the musical benefactor Frank Schuster.[4] Fauré accepted her invitation to compose the music for the production, despite the tight deadline – the play was to open in June of that year. He wrote to his wife, “I will have to grind away hard for Mélisande when I get back. I hardly have a month and a half to write all that music. True, some of it is already in my thick head!”[5] It was Mrs Campbell who commissioned Fauré to write the incidental music to the play. She “felt sure M. Gabriel Fauré was the composer needed.”[6]

 

As he often did, Fauré reused music written for incomplete or unsuccessful works.[7] A sicilienne from his unfinished 1893 score for Le Bourgeois gentilhomme was the most substantial piece retrieved for Pelléas et Mélisande.[8] Pressed for time, and never greatly interested in orchestrating, Fauré enlisted the help of his pupil Charles Koechlin, who accompanied him to London.[5] The complete incidental music comprised 19 pieces (2 are missing) of varying length and importance.[9]

 

Fauré conducted the orchestra for the premiere, at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre on 21 June 1898.[10] Mrs Campbell was enchanted by his music, in which, she wrote, “he had grasped with most tender inspiration the poetic purity that pervades and envelops M. Maeterlinck’s lovely play”.[11] She asked him to compose further theatre music for her in the first decade of the 20th century, but to his regret his workload as director of the Paris Conservatoire made it impossible.[12] Over the next 14 years, she revived the play, always using Fauré’s score. In 1904, the music was used for a production of the original French version of the play, starring Sarah Bernhardt.[9] Fauré’s incidental music was used again in Georgette Leblanc‘s production of the play in the cloisters and gardens of Saint-Wandrille abbey in August 1910, conducted by Albert Wolff.[13]

 

There are two different versions of the original theatre score for Pelléas et Mélisande in existence. The first is Koechlin’s autograph of the orchestral score, dating from May and June 1898, and incorporating several rough sketches by Fauré in short score.[9] The second is the conducting score used by Fauré in London; this is also a manuscript in Koechlin’s handwriting.[9]

 

Fauré later reused the music for Mélisande’s song in his song cycle La chanson d’Ève, adapting it to fit words by the Symbolist poet Charles van Lerberghe.[14] The Sicilienne became very popular as an independent piece, with arrangements for flute and piano (by Henri Büsser among others), for cello and piano, as well as other instruments. Extracts from Pelléas et Mélisande were used by George Balanchine as the score for the Emeralds section of his 1967 ballet Jewels.

 

After Fauré, three other leading composers completed works inspired by Maeterlinck’s drama: Debussy‘s opera (1902), Schoenberg‘s early tone poem (1903) and Sibelius‘s incidental music (1905).[15]

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Great Compositions/Performances: Ana Vidovic – Concert


[youtube.com/watch?v=kutrK1XA9bM]

Niccolo Paganini – Grande Sonata: Allegro Risoluto, Romanze, Andantino Variato
Bach – First Violin Sonata, BWV 1001: Adagio, Fuga, Siciliana, Presto
Manuel Ponce – Sonatina Meridional: Campo, Copla, Fiesta
William Walton – Five Bagatelles: Allego, Andante, Alla Cubana, Smpre Expressivo, Con Slancio
Federico-Moreno Torroba – Sonatina: Allegretto, Andante, Allegro

Start – 16:00 Paganini
16:01 – 29:40 Bach
29:42 – 38:06 Ponce
38:09 – 51:00 Walton
51:02 – End Torroba

http://www.altracitta.eu

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Great Composers/Compositions: Respighi: Ancient Airs and Dances, Suite No. 3



Ottorino Respighi (1879 – 1936)
Ancient Airs and Dances / Antiche arie e danze per liuto
Suite No. 3 (1932)

I. Italiana (0:00)
II. Arie di corte (1:55)
III. Siciliana (8:39)
IV. Passacaglia (12:18)

Sir Neville Marriner
Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra
1976
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ancient Airs and Dances (Italian: Antiche arie e danze) is a set of three orchestral suites by Italian composer Ottorino Respighi. In addition to being a renowned composer and conductor, Respighi was also a notable musicologist. His interest in Italian music of the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries led him to compose works inspired by the music of these periods.

Suite No. 3 was composed in 1932. It differs from the previous two suites in that it is arranged for strings only and somewhat melancholy in overall mood. It is based on lute songs by Besard, a piece for baroque guitar by Ludovico Roncalli, and lute pieces by Santino Garsi da Parma and additional anonymous composers.

  1. Italiana (Anonymous: Italiana (Fine sec.XVI) – Andantino)
  2. Arie di corte (Jean-Baptiste Besard: Arie di corte (Sec.XVI) – Andante cantabile – Allegretto – Vivace – Slow with great expression – Allegro vivace – Vivacissimo – Andante cantabile)
  3. Siciliana (Anonymous: Siciliana (Fine sec.XVI) – Andantino)
  4. Passacaglia (Lodovico Roncalli: Passacaglia (1692) – Maestoso – Vivace)

 

 

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Respighi: Ancient Airs and Dances, Suite No. 3 (1976 was a good year)



Ottorino Respighi (1879 – 1936)
Ancient Airs and Dances / Antiche arie e danze per liuto
Suite No. 3 (1932)

I. Italiana (0:00)
II. Arie di corte (1:55)
III. Siciliana (8:39)
IV. Passacaglia (12:18)

Sir Neville Marriner
Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra
1976