Tag Archives: slovak philharmonic orchestra


Ludwig van Beethoven, Fidelio, Op. 72: Overture, Fidelio, Op. 72

Dvorak – Symphony No.3 & 4, Op.10 & 13|great compositions/performances


DvorakSymphony No.3 & 4,

Op.10 & 13

Alexander Porfir’yevich Borodin, In the Steppes of Central Asia, In the Steppes Of Central Asia: great compositions/performances


Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141: great compositions/performances


Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141

Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra, Zdenek Kosler

Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141
1. Allegro maestoso 12’42
2. Poco adagio 10’21
3. Scherzo, vivace 7’49
4. Finale, allegro 9’49

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Handel Concerto Grosso No.5 Op.6 in D major HWV 323, SCO



Handel Concerto Grosso No.5 Op.6 in D major HWV 323, Complete
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1. Maestoso
2. Allegro
3. Presto
4. Largo
5. Allegro
6. Menuet. Un poco larghetto

Bohdan Warchal 1st violin
Peter Hamar 2nd violin
Juraj Alexander Violoncello

Slovak Chamber Orchestra
Bohdan Warchal Conductor

Slovak Chamber Orchestra
Established in 1960 by Professor Bohdan Warchal, the Slovak Chamber Orchestra has since developed into one of the most popular ensembles in the field of Slovak classical music, and one of the principal interpreters of Slovak art music abroad. Over the years the Slovak Chamber Orchestra has introduced itself on the most important concert stages and music festivals in Europe, North and South America, Asia and Australia. It has co-operated with many prominent world-renowned soloists, and inspired the work of several Slovak composers, resulting in premiere performances of their new compositions. The ensemble has recorded more than 100 music titles originating in different periods, for domestic as well as foreign record companies.

Bohdan Warchal
(27 January 1930, Orlová, Czechoslovakia 30 December 2000, Bratislava, Slovakia) was a Slovak violinist, a member of the Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra and founder, chief conductor and soloist of the Slovak Chamber Orchestra.

* 19571964 – concertmaster of the Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
* 1964 – artistic leader of the Slovak Chamber Orchestra
* 19591963 – external pedagogue at the State Conservatory Bratislava
* 1980 – pedagogue at the Academy of Performing Arts in Bratislava
* 1995 – moved from the Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra to the Prague Chamber Orchestra
* 1997 – became the leader of the Slovak Chamber Orchestra again
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Make Music Part of Your Life – Series: Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141


Antonín DvořákSymphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141
1. Allegro maestoso 12’42
2. Poco adagio-F major 10’21
3. Scherzo, vivace poco meno mosso 7’49
4. Finale, allegro 9’49
****The work, at approximately 40 minutes in length, is scored for an orchestra of 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A and B♭, 2 bassoons, 4 horns in D and F, 2 trumpets in C, D, and F, 3 trombonestimpani and strings***

Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra, Zdenek Kosler

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 

Title page of the score of Dvořák’s seventh symphony, with portrait of Hans von Bülow

Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141, by Antonín Dvořák (published as No. 2) was first performed in London on April 22, 1885 shortly after the piece was completed on March 17, 1885.

Composition history

Dvořák’s work on the symphony began on December 13, 1884. Dvořák heard and admired Brahms‘s new 3rd Symphony, and this prompted him to think of writing of a new symphony himself. So it was fortuitous that in that same year the Philharmonic Society of London invited him to write a new symphony and elected him as an honorary member. A month later, after his daily walk to the railway station in Prague, he said “the first subject of my new symphony flashed in to my mind on the arrival of the festive train bringing our countrymen from Pest”. The Czechs were in fact coming to the National Theatre in Prague, where there was to be a musical evening to support the political struggles of the Czech nation. He resolved that his new symphony would reflect this struggle. In doing so the symphony would also reveal something of his personal struggle in reconciling his simple and peaceful countryman’s feelings with his intense patriotism and his wish to see the Czech nation flourish.

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George Gershwin – An American in Paris



An American in Paris is a symphonic tone poem by the American composer George Gershwin, written in 1928. Inspired by the time Gershwin had spent in Paris, it evokes the sights and energy of the French capital in the 1920s.

Gershwin composed the piece on commission from the New York Philharmonic. He also did the orchestration (he did not orchestrate his musicals). Gershwin scored An American in Paris for the standard instruments of the symphony orchestra plus celesta, saxophone, and automobile horns. Gershwin brought back some Parisian taxi horns for the New York premiere of the composition, which took place on December 13, 1928 in Carnegie Hall, with Walter Damrosch conducting the New York Philharmonic.

Conductor: Richard Hayman
Orchestra: Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra