Tag Archives: Smetana

make music part of your life series: Smetana – Die Moldau (Karajan and the Berlin Philarmonic Orchestra)


[youtube.com/watch?v=gTKsHwqaIr4]

Smetana – Die Moldau (Karajan)

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make music part of your life series: Bedřich Smetana Má Vlast My Fatherland 6. BLANÍK, Rafael Kubelík


[youtube.com/watch?v=Mx7gDjLcwHY]

Smetana: Má Vlast – Harnoncourt/RCO(2010Live)

Smetana: Má Vlast - Harnoncourt/RCO(2010Live)

Smetana: Má Vlast – Harnoncourt/RCO(2010Live)

 

 

Smetana, Kubelik:Great Compositions/Performances: Ma Vlast (From Bohemia’s Fields and Meadows, 4/6)


[youtube.com/watch?v=jCRFe07Aot0]
Smetana, Kubelik: Ma Vlast (From Bohemia‘s Fields and Meadows, 4/6)
IV: Z Ceskych Luhu a Haju (From Bohemia’s Fields and Meadows)
Bedrich Smetana, composer
Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Rafael Kubelik
Studio Recording, 1952 (Mercury Living Presence)

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Bedrich Smetana: Louisa’s Polka



Bedřich Smetana (March 2, 1824 — May 12, 1884) was a Czech composer who pioneered the development of a musical style which became closely identified with his country’s aspirations to independent statehood. He is thus widely regarded in his homeland as the father of Czech music.

When he was young, his father sent him to Prague to study in the autumn of 1839. After his father discovered that the young son was not paying much attention to his school, the father placed him temporarily with his uncle in Nové Město, where he enjoyed a brief romance with his cousin Louisa. He commemorated their passion in Louisa’s Polka, Smetana’s earliest complete composition that has survived.

This is my way to commemorate Smetana’s birthday (March 2, 1824) by combining his melodious dance music with some of the great dance clips from Hollywood films.

Music: Louisa’s Polka — Bedrich Smetana
Performed by Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra
Conductor: Frantisek Jilek

Visual excerpts taken from these videos:
Fred Astaire and Eleanor Powell: “Jukebox Dance” — Film: Broadway Melody (1940)
Fred Astaire, Leslie Caron: “Sluefoot” — Daddy Long Legs (1955)
Fred Astaire and Eleanor Powell: “Begin the Beguine” — Film: Broadway Melody (1940)
Fred Astaire and Marjorie Reynolds : “Be Careful, It’s My Heart”– Holiday Inn (1942)
Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers: “Too Hot to Handle” — Roberta (1935).
Lisa Miles and Tim Balfour – A Variation on Fred and Ginger for the third act of Opera Australia’s production of Die Fledermaus at the Sydney Opera House.
Mikhail Baryshnikov and Gregory Hines — Film: White Nights (1985)
Fred Astaire and Rita Hayworth: “So Near and Yet So Far” — Film: You Will Never Get Rich (1941)

 

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FABULOUS COMPOSITIONS/COMPOSERS: SMETANA MA VLAST – MOLDAU


 

Statue of Bedřich Smetana by the Vltava river

Statue of Bedřich Smetana by the Vltava river (Photo credit: Jorge Lascar)

Má vlast (Czech pronunciation: [maː vlast], meaning”Mycountry/homeland”) is a set of six symphonic poems composed between 1874 and 1879 by the Czech composer Bedřich Smetana. While it is often presented as a single work in six movements and – with the exception of Vltava – is almost always recorded that way, the six pieces were conceived as individual works. They had their own separate premieres between 1875 and 1880; the premiere of the complete set took place on 5 November 1882 in Prague, under Adolf Čech, who had also conducted two of the individual premieres.

 

In these works Smetana combined the symphonic poem form pioneered by Franz Liszt with the ideals of nationalistic music which were current in the late nineteenth century. Each poem depicts some aspect of the countryside, history, or legends of Bohemia.

 

Vltava [DIE MOLDAU]

 

The Vltava in Prague

 

Vltava, also known by its German name Die Moldau (or The Moldau), was composed between 20 November and 8 December 1874 and was premiered on 4 April 1875 under Adolf Čech. It is about 12 minutes long, and is in the key of E minor.

 

In this piece, Smetana uses tone painting to evoke the sounds of one of Bohemia’s great rivers.[2] In his own words:

 

The composition describes the course of the Vltava, starting from the two small springs, the Cold and Warm Vltava, to the unification of both streams into a single current, the course of the Vltava through woods and meadows, through landscapes where a farmer’s wedding is celebrated, the round dance of the mermaids in the night’s moonshine: on the nearby rocks loom proud castles, palaces and ruins aloft. The Vltava swirls into the St John’s Rapids; then it widens and flows toward Prague, past the Vyšehrad, and then majestically vanishes into the distance, ending at the Labe (orElbe, in German).

 

Motif of Vltava

 

The piece contains Smetana’s most famous tune. It is an adaptation of the melody La Mantovana, attributed to the Italian renaissance tenor Giuseppe Cenci (also known as Giuseppino),[3] which, in a borrowedMoldovan form, was also the basis for the Israeli national anthemHatikvah. The tune also appears in major in an old folk Czech song Kočka leze dírou (“The Cat Crawls Through the Hole”), and Hanns Eislerused it for his “Song of the Moldau”.
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BEDŘICH SMETANA – VLTAVA


Bedřich Smetana


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  
“Smetana” redirects here. For other uses, see Smetana (disambiguation).
Portrait of balding, bearded, bespectacled middle-aged man with solemn expression, wearing a bow tie and high-buttoned jacket

Portrait of Bedřich Smetana

Smetana signature.jpg

Bedřich Smetana (Czech pronunciation: [ˈbɛdr̝ɪx ˈsmɛtana] ( listen); 2 March 1824 – 12 May 1884) was a Czech composer who pioneered the development of a musical style which became closely identified with his country’s aspirations to independent statehood. He is thus widely regarded in his homeland as the father of Czech music. Internationally he is best known for his opera The Bartered Bride, for the symphonic cycle Má vlast (“My Fatherland”), which portrays the history, legends and landscape of the composer’s native land, and for his First String Quartet From My Life. Continue reading

Bedrich Smetana-Overture from “The Bartered Bride”



Mariss Jansons-Berliner Philharmoniker